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"Oigo los pasos del bebé."

Translation:I hear the baby's footsteps.

0
5 years ago

80 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chrisflath

Yes because babies are typically very heavy and know how to walk there footsteps can be really a nuisance.

200
Reply25 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Interesting point... does anyone know if there is a spanish equivalent for "toddler"? spanishdict came up with "nino pequeno"... but I'm wondering if there's anything more specific to a small child who's just started walking...

47
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danzarr

niñito/niñita, which is basicly short hand for niño pequeño.

112
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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gracias Danzarr

-8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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There are a couple of words/phrases, but none of them have quite the same scope as "toddler". The good news is that Spanish speakers are as confused about the possible translation as we are.

I think the answer is the word párvulo, which is essentially a preschooler, and is closest I think to toddler in meaning (un colegio de párvulos is a nursery school), and is also the suggestion given most often in every source and forum I can find.

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmurowchick

This is so interesting to me... I know there are words that just don't translate easily from one language to another, I just wouldn't expect "toddler" to be one of them!

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvanw
bvanw
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Toddle is poetically affine to Waddle. One toddles in diapers, or waddles from being saddle-sore.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Nursery school is generally age 4. Toddlers are ages 2-3.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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Thank you.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

I went to the same place spanishdict and typed in "to Toddle" dar los primeros pasos"= "He toddled off". I guess it still has to be how one "passes"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magneticlive
magneticlive
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"Dar los primeros pasos" = "Gatear" a baby "Gatea" don't walk :) maybe that is the word you are looking for

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CScubing
CScubing
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The child of the 50 foot woman?

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mickey553994

Their

0
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvanw
bvanw
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Would not "I hear baby steps" not also be an accurate translation? In English "baby steps" is an idiom phrase meaning tiny steps, like those a baby first takes. Is there a similar usage or idiom in Spanish?

32
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k8sans
k8sans
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I thought about this too but I think baby steps has more of a figurative meaning. Here, they seem to be expressing actually hearing footsteps of a baby. Whereas you wouldn't hear the "babysteps" of a major change or undertaking (as in the idiom). I don't know, though. That was the only way I could understand it not being accepted.

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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I think you're being way too nice in your response. "Baby steps" is definitely metaphorical, is not physical, steps small or otherwise, and as a result is likely to be inaudible, although the baby steps could be the small steps you take in learning how to play an instrument ;)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaisula
jaisula
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In USA we say "I hear baby steps", never you'll hear "I hear baby's steps"... I can guarantee that, although I understand that to be politically correct we have to say 'baby's steps' (even though that expression is never used, maybe only in writing)

-21
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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Baby steps is an expression meaning to do something in small increments. If you heard a baby walking, you would definitely say, "I hear the baby's steps".

15
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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I think you may mean "grammatically correct" rather than "politically correct".

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kiltown
kiltown
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"I hear the patter of tiny feet" is a common expression in my part of the world. It is not meant to be taken literally. It usually means, "I suspect someone is expecting a baby". Perhaps "Oigo los pasos del bebe" could have a similar meaning.

18
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

I'll buy that. It makes more sense than assuming we're talking about Paul Bunyan's baby.

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn-Grace

I thought it said patos instead of pasos and my sentence became; I here the baby's ducks. : / haha

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlie_Treuse

What does this sentence have to do with "direction"?

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vessiecakes
vessiecakes
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I assume to teach the word for "footsteps" in relation to movement/travel

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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oigo, oyes, oye, oímos, ois, oyen (to hear, presente)

7
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrBymur
HerrBymur
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Solamente en el indicativo. en el subjuntivo son oiga, oigas, oiga oigamos, oigáis, y oigan

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SageTX

Thanks.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMS221

Horror film moment!

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slagar1
Slagar1
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I'm glad I'm not the only one who viewed it that way.

0
Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnaKerie
AnaKerie
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I keep mixing up "hear" and "hate". So I put "I hate the baby's footsteps." Probably better for everyone that I remain childless.

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

Oh, don't be so hard on yourself.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrentPope1

While watching some spanish programming, i was confused as to why some characters would say "pase" (or a form of pasar) to invite someone into a room. Now it makes sense. It's like saying "step (into the room)."

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Literally, to pass. In other words, "Come in!"

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krishayts

In spain, newborns walk out of the hospital to the car when they're ready, hence having to listen out for their steps

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegK.
OlegK.
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Run for your life!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

Oh my gosh

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdldbb
sdldbb
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what is the difference between steps of the baby, and steps from the baby

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JSRyding

How is it related to travel?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

When you are on a viaje, you stay at a roadside hotel. You're the only resident... And at night you hear los pasos del bebé...

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mujer134

Does "los" here act as the direct object pronoun for oigo with "pasos del bebe" as the clarifier of "los"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

No, "los" is the plural definite article ("the" in English) for masculine:

el paso - the step/pace

los pasos - the steps/paces

Singular masculine nouns - el

Plural masculine nouns - los

Singular feminine nouns - la

Plural feminine nouns - las

2
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mujer134

Oops. Sometimes you can stare at this stuff for too long and see complexity where there is none. Thank you for replying and here's a lingot for your trouble.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibapah

Why not "I can hear the baby's steps" or footsteps? It does not like the word "can". It is a bit redundant but is better spoken English in my opinion.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

You are adding a word that isn't there.

"Can" uses the verb "poder" - to be able to.

"I can hear the baby's steps" would be: "Puedo oír los pasos del bebé"

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

shaaaaaaaawn the sheeeeeeeeeep

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrBymur
HerrBymur
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Couldn't "I hear the infant's footsteps" work here as well?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Infants can't walk.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrBymur
HerrBymur
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In which case, neither can babies, for they are synonyms.

-1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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I don't know how much this differs across regions, but for me, infants are extremely young babies, certainly pre-walking, perhaps even pre-crawling. Babies. on the other hand, can comfortably describe children up until the growth spurt at the end of toddlerhood, when the baby becomes "a young child". (Of course, all meanings are somewhat subjective, but infants and babies aren't precise synonyms as a result.).

(My husband's response is completely different. He's Australian. For him, he would reverse my two definitions.)

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

then this sentence is creepy. I guess it is Chucky

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icallmyselfLee

I hear the steps of the drink!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

XD

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dckalia
dckalia
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Why is this in "Directions" :o

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Because los pasos del bebé are coming to get you. They are coming toward you. Always coming toward. Never ending pasos del bebé

3
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Hide derecha!! Hide izquierda!! Hide centro!! You can't escape from the bebé!

1
Reply2 years ago