"Schreibst du dem Großvater?"

Translation:Are you writing to the grandfather?

August 12, 2013

122 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GranoblasticMan

I understand that this question is literally "Are you writing (to) THE grandfather?" but I seem to recall it could also be interpreted as "Are you writing (to) YOUR grandfather?" -- is this correct or not?

August 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drch

That would be "Schreibst du deinem Großvater?"

November 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Faux3

I agree. But I wrote "your" before thinking too much, and it said "correct"! They likely added it as acceptable after enough complaints, but literally, techically, I was wrong. And I don't admit that often... ;~)

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    As a literal translation it may not be correct (dem does not mean "your"), but German sentences do not always translate word-for-word to English. For some reason, Germans will often refer to people with der/die/etc. This isn't something Duolingo really teaches so don't worry about it. But Germans do speak this way in conversation, which is why Duolingo marks it correct.

    April 20, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexrandall7

    This is correct. A way to emphasize a person in german is to use the article: "wo ist der Julia?" would be equivalent to where is Julia, but it is used to emphasize the subject. "Wo ist die Oma / der Opa / die Mama / der Papa?"

    September 23, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strandfloh

    @AnnaSusita: It is
    "Wo ist die Julia?" (nominative) and
    "Schreibst du der Julia?"(dative)

    June 24, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaSusita

    Did you mean "die Julia", or is it always "der" with names regardless of gender?

    April 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L5730

    I can't see a reason why anyone would write to a grandfather specifically, unless it was to their own (or by marriage). Of course one could write to a bloke who is someone's grandfather but, for all that anyone would care, it's just a bloke one is writing to. Dodgy sentence. should be "deinem" not "dem" to make it a more sensible sentence in my opinion.

    October 25, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/savourtardis

    Well, I tried to think of an example of such a situation and thought back to the first ever episode of the British sci-fi Doctor Who (way back in 1963--no, I'm not that old), in which an alternate premise could have included such a sentence. One of the two teachers might ask the other "Are you writing the grandfather?" if they were already talking about Susan. In this case, that the Doctor is Susan's grandfather is significant because he's the guardian the teachers would try to consult with regarding her.

    November 3, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leogang

    It does make it a little tricker when they throw in uncommon, or odd sounding sentences, but I think that's a good thing for learning the language as it keeps you on your toes and pushes you to think a little deeper rather than just more or less autopiloting through the "easy" ones.

    July 27, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L5730

    I hadn't thought about it like that. That does make sense, I guess, as you say "keeps one on their toes". I'll confess the multiple choice questions can lead someone to look for the key word, rather than learn and understand the entire sentence, eg, if the English was "He watches television", and only one of three answers had "Fernsehen" in it, it's gonna be that answer, even though the rest of the sentence may not look so correct.

    July 27, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leogang

    Yea I used to rush through these as quickly as I could and it required very little understanding to complete the multiple choice questions. I try to read through each answer and identify everything that makes it correct now.

    July 27, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L5730

    Indeed. It's all about learning here, there no race to accrue 'score'. So ultimately when we have just whizzed through, we've done ourselves no favours. ...and so it comes back to the topic above, having out-of-ordinary sentences can look strange, and be a source of debate, but ultimately as long as word order, grammar, and all the other jiggery pokery is in order, it can only serve to help one's greater learning - which is why we are all here of course :)

    Have fun and happy learning.

    July 28, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clifford896649

    Is "dem" considered a contraction of "deinem"? That is how my brain might interpret it.

    September 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    No, “dem” is the Dative form of “der” and “das”. https://www.thoughtco.com/the-four-german-noun-cases-4064290

    September 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4of92000

    Duo accepted it.

    February 11, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      From my experience, this is how the sentence would be interpreted in Germany. For example, this sentence is something a parent might say to their child. Unlike in English, it's perfectly normal to say dem instead of deinem because the implication is so clear. I imagine that saying deinem makes sense to clarify when two people of different families are speaking with each other, but it might sound weirdly specific within the same family.

      December 5, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aernest825

      I put "do you write your grandfather" and it was accepted

      September 10, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
      Mod

        It's less common, but this is how it would be phrased in some variants of English. It sounds odd to me though.

        December 5, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian.Worthington

        The feeling I'm starting to get about German - maybe someone could tell me if I'm wrong or not - is that the definition object is used much more than we would in English, and a better English translation of this sentence would be "are you writing to grandfather", leaving the question of whose grandfather to be resolved by context.

        October 23, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

        That would be used if it was our grandfather, for the speaker and person spoken to.

        October 23, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jotomicron

        In Portuguese, when we say "write to THE grandfather", it's implied that the man is grandfather of both speaker and listener. Does the same hold in German?

        December 13, 2013

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ziixxxitria

        Do you mean "the grandfather" means both my and your grandfather, otherwise you would say "your" or "my" grandfather instead? That is interesting! I do not know if it is like that in German though. In English, "the grandfather" sounds weird, but I would interpret it to mean neither the listener's or speaker's, but rather someone else's, or a generic grandfather.

        October 12, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G0108

        In Portuguese, if you say "write to the grandfather", it's more like your writing to the man who is both the speaker and listeners grandfather. Jotomicron made a good point, and as a native Portuguese speaker, I also had this question.

        November 13, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mari3m

        Actually, this is something that was assumed by part of population who speaks Portuguese. There are regions of Brazil where there are no differentiation in meaning simple by using "the" in the sentence. So, the assumption that the grandfather is from both speaker and listener is more likely to be something cultural than a rule of Portuguese itself.

        February 27, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlonsoTW

        Not likely, The grandfather also applies to spanish as well.

        PD: Many Portuguese friends always tell me Brazilian portuguese is “bad" Portuguese.

        February 25, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mari3m

        Well, it is not bad; it is Brazilian Portuguese, a different language altough with same name! =)

        April 22, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smuris

        German is my native language, and no, it is not like this in German. If anything, then "your grandfather" is implied.

        March 28, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibra531117

        As native speaker ,is it wrong if we add a prepostion to the sentence ,

        February 29, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ana_81

        It's the same in Spanish. I'd like to know this too.

        May 24, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaimeLopezS

        Native spanish speaker here, and I don't agree. It may be used by two people who have the same grandfather (e.g. cousin to cousin: Escribe al abuelo) and in this case the implication is valid. But it can be used by unrelated parties to refer to someone elses grandfather (e.g. teacher to teacher). In this case the implication of common grandfather doesn't hold.

        July 4, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

        That is interesting about Portuguese. If the man is grandfather of both speaker and listener in English, the speaker would say "our grandfather."

        July 27, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zmoliu

        why is it in the dative case "dem" and not the accusative "den"?

        March 4, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helenev

        http://german.about.com/library/blcase_dat.htm

        Dative is used for "indirect objects", like in this case, where the letter would be the direct object, and the grandfather is the receiver, and thus an inderect object. In English, this can be expressed with "to"; e.g. "I am writing a letter (object -> accusative) to my grandfather (indirecte object -> dative) = Ich schreibe meinem Großvater (masculine dative) einen Brief (masculine accusative)

        March 4, 2014

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unusualbeing

        Also, the sentence order will change depending on if the Direct Object is a noun or pronoun. If the Direct Object is a noun then it will go after the Indirect Object. As the example sentence from helenev. If the Direct Object is a pronoun then it will go before the Indirect Object. Ich schreibe es meinem Großvater.

        March 10, 2015

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
        Mod

          Oh. I thought the word order was quite flexible as long as the cases were correct. Are you saying that it is incorrect to write "Ich schreibe einen Brief meinem Großvater"?

          October 18, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ingo.Jobling

          If the accusative has an indefinite article, the accusative is always behind the dative.

          http://www.deutschegrammatik20.de/wortposition/wortposition-dativ-akkusativ/

          May 22, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
          Mod

            In the seven months since I asked that question, I found a very helpful series of explanations about word order. They explain that different orders can be correct, but it changes the emphasis. And depending on the context, different emphases may be more natural than others. This comment on the explanations describes it well.

            Specifically, to paraphrase that series of explanations as they apply to this sentence, the most natural word order out of context is Ich schreibe meinem Großvater einen Brief, because the most relevant information goes to the end in this sentence. What am I writing? A letter. So einen Brief comes last. To reverse them puts emphasis on meinem Großvater, but there are situations where this would actually be preferred: if someone asks "Who are you writing to?" it would be better to answer with Ich schreibe einen Brief meinem Großvater.

            May 22, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daughterofAlbion

            Thanks, that was very useful

            July 28, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belsol

            In English we also say" Are you writing to Grandfather.

            September 17, 2013

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rufus...

            Yes but that would imply that the grandfather is the grandfather of both parties. Is that the same here in German?

            June 25, 2014

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
            Mod

              This is not necessarily implied.

              Source: My German girlfriend's mother would say "the grandfather" (in German) when speaking to my girlfriend. In this case, she is referring to my girlfriend's grandfather, not her own grandfather. So, he is not the grandfather of both and this usage is apparently allowed.

              [EDIT: If a German native-speaker reads this and can explain further, that would be great!]

              October 18, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

              It is also not necessarily so when saying just "Grandfather" in English. We give names to people for children to say: Mom, Dad, Grandpapa, Grandmama and we use those "names" so the children learn how to call people within the family. If the grandfather wanted to be called "Grandfather", then we would ask the child that way and the man would be the child's grandfather and not mine.

              July 27, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmarSh2

              Masc: der > dem Ein > einem

              Neu: Das > dem Ein > einem

              Fem: Die > der Eine > einer

              Plur: Die > den Keine > keinen

              December 11, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Bora-

              Why not "Do you write to the grandfather?" It's a question and duolingo says that it must be "You write to the grandfather"? If "Are you writing to the grandfather?" is one of the answers, my answer should have been accepted.

              February 21, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

              Yes, it should also be accepted.

              August 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoStylin

              This sounds weird " You write the grandfather"

              October 12, 2013

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesucristoAteo

              the dative case implies its writing to the grandfather I think. I could be wrong.

              October 31, 2013

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinterCZ

              Yes, it does

              May 4, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liesl30

              Is this asking the same thing as "Schreibst du am den Grossvater?"

              November 3, 2013

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helenev

              "am" is short for "an dem", so it should just be "schreibst du an den grossvater"

              January 7, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WadeAppel

              Would it be proper to say "Scheibst du am Grossvater?"

              May 7, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smuris

              That doesn't work - unless the grandfather is some kind of location where the writing is done.

              March 28, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tochisaaa

              Grossvater=Opa, wrong?

              October 27, 2013

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

              Opa is informal, Großvater is formal.

              May 31, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesucristoAteo

              Yeah, Im pretty sure Heidi says Opa lol

              October 31, 2013

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gharish199

              When is dative case used? Only with certain prepositions or??

              February 19, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helenev

              http://german.about.com/library/blcase_dat.htm

              Dative is used for "indirect objects", like in this case, where the letter would be the direct object, and the grandfather is the receiver, and thus an inderect object. In English, this can be expressed with "to"; e.g. "I am writing a letter (object -> accusative) to my grandfather (indirecte object -> dative) = Ich schreibe meinem Großvater (masculine dative) einen Brief (masculine accusative)

              March 4, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mitta2345

              Is "writing to your Grandfather?" incorrect then? It makes sense in English and Portuguese

              April 12, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smuris

              "Zu deinem Großvater schreiben" is incorrect. "An deinen Großvater schreiben" would be correct.

              April 12, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mitta2345

              I appreciate that, but as the sentence is obviously directed to a person and they have been mentioned later in the sentence indirectly using "your", is it incorrect to remove "are you" from the beginning of the question and just say "writing to your Grandfather?" rather than "are you writing […]?"

              April 12, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smuris

              OK - I understand what you mean. Nothing has been removed. German just doesn't use the gerund like English does. When making a statement, you usually would not say "Du bist schreibend", you say "Du schreibst". To construct a question out of this statement, you then have to change the word order to "Schreibst du?". That's different from the way questions are formed in English. In English, you would need to use the auxiliary verb "to do" in this case, but not in German.

              April 12, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyamkumarR

              "Ich schreibe DEM Großvatter" or "Ich schreibe ZUM Großvatter" or "Ich schreibe ZU Großvatter" which one to use?

              December 5, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

              The first one is correct.

              August 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c3230

              Why is it not: Schreibst du DER Grosvater?

              July 2, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/septiros

              Der is feminine dative. Großvater is masculine, so it takes dem.

              February 23, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGuitGuy

              "The indirect receiver" could anyone put this into simpler terms?

              August 11, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teachinjos

              Think of it this way. I give the book to the teacher. I = subject give = verb the book = the object (what do I give? = the book) to the teacher = indirect object = the receiver of the object. You dont give the teacher, you give the book. The teacher is the receiver of the object given. Nominative for the subject, Accusative for the object, Dative for the indirect object. English and German are more or less identical in this pattern, HOWEVER, there are some German verbs that want to be difficult and dont follow this pattern. A very good example is HELFEN. In English we help a person. Person = direct object so Accusative. But not in German. HELFEN always takes the Dative, i.e. indirect object. In German you always HELP TO A PERSON. In English I help you. In German I help TO you = Ich helfe DIR. There are not many rascals (Im being polite) like this but you just have to be aware of them as you learn the language.

              June 21, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

              Yes, you can think of it as the person is receiving help from the subject.

              August 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MohammadBres

              --dem instead of der and das

              --der instead of die

              September 15, 2014

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Squidlilly

              How do I know when to use 'dem' instead of 'den'?

              January 13, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L5730

              Here the grandfather is the receiver of this writing, that makes it the Dative object. Großvater is just like Vater and it's a 'der' word in it's Nominative form. In Dative "the" is Dem (m), Der (f), Dem (n), Den (pl). Schreibst du dem Großvater? = Dative (m) = dem Großvater.

              If you were giving the coffee (m) to a friend (m), you would use Accusative form, because the coffee would be the direct object of a transitive verb, the object the verb is directly working on. Accusative "the" is Den (m), Die (f), Das (n), Die (pl).

              Ich gebe den Kaffee meinem Freund = I give the coffee [to] my friend.

              See here how the coffee is the Acc. Object, and the friend is the Dat. Reciever.

              January 13, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bnbnb2

              If i wrote to grandmother, Should it be "Schreibst du der Grandmutter?" ??

              February 16, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/septiros

              Yes... but grandmother is großmutter, not grandmutter.

              February 23, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/septiros

              Is the direct object hidden here?

              And sometimes confused to use "for" or "to".

              February 23, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smuris

              Sort of. The most likely direct object in this sentence would be "einen Brief" or "eine Postkarte".

              March 28, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

              Everyone keeps putting in"the letter" but there is no Brief in this sentence!

              December 23, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

              Yes, we don’t know what is being written, but we are trying to explain the difference between the Dative and Accusative cases so we add a direct object to help explain that.

              August 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElyssaBarrett

              I was always taught that der became den instead of dem are they both right or am I wrong?

              May 4, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3388winterthur

              You are wrong. Write to someone =dativ, dem

              May 4, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

              “der” becomes “den” when the noun is no longer in the Nominative case as a subject or predicate nominative would be and becomes the direct object which is in the Accusative case. However, if the noun is now the indirect object, then it would be in the Dative case which changes again to “dem”. https://easy-deutsch.de/en/nouns/cases/

              That is just the masculine noun. The feminine noun which did not change from Nominative to Accusative case now takes “der” in the Dative case!

              August 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuntieE

              My tablet does not have that ( B) I shoild not be marked wrong

              November 27, 2015

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
              Mod

                To type ß, hold down the S key and you should see the option. You can also type ss as a backup. If that method does not work for you, look here.

                November 27, 2015

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom430896

                Why is "du" not capitalized? I was told by a native German that "ich" is not capitalized, whereas "Du" is, the opposite of English.

                November 29, 2015

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
                Mod

                  It's outdated. From the first web search result: http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa020919b.htm

                  November 30, 2015

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrRushabhT

                  is there a particular reason a way of saying 'to' is omitted?....(ie, are you writing TO your grandfather?)

                  January 27, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emegele

                  I believe that's exactly what the dative case does. The nominative case shows who does the action ("du schreibst") and the dative case shows who receives it ("dem Großvater"). We say "to" to indicate who receives the action in English, don't we? So, in German it's exactly the same — but they don't need a particle like "to" to indicate the object because the dative case already does that. The dative case is their way of saying "to"; they're not ommiting it.

                  January 27, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrRushabhT

                  ach so!....(here's a lingot!)

                  January 27, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emegele

                  Thank you so much!

                  January 29, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mateomijo

                  You wouldn't naturally say this in English. You would say "Are you writing to Grandfather/Grampa, etc. He is a person, not a simple object.

                  March 4, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosTova139608

                  Shouldn't you say " ihr schriebe du dem Großvater " ?

                  June 11, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shiodegrd

                  So, in the dative case, is it similar to in english when you say "I give it (to the[dem]) man", as opposed to "I see (the{den}) man"?

                  September 13, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  Yes, but this is a simplified explanation. You will find that many prepositions take the Dative case while some take the Accusative case and a few take the Genitive case. There are also some verbs that require the Dative case which also need to be memorized or you can check a dictionary to see what form the verb takes.

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RKhan

                  Is this also correct: Schreibst du zum Großvater?

                  October 7, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  No, you are trying to translate word by word from the English. In English we don’t have a change in ending to show what function the noun is being used for, so we can add “to” when the indirect object comes after the direct object, but in fact when our indirect object comes before the direct object in English even we don’t use “to”. “I write a letter to my grandfather.” = “I write my grandfather a letter.” In German “dem” gives the information that it is in Dative case and so it cannot be the subject and it cannot be the direct object. There is no confusion. They do not use “zum” for this.

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

                  Useful for instructional purposed, but a strange sounding sentence. For further instruction, if you wanted to say "Do you write to the grandfathers?" you would use "den Großvatern"? Correct or no?

                  October 8, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  Almost, don’t forget the umlaut in “den Großvätern”.

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lactea88

                  Can anyone tell me how would "Did you write to grandfather" translate? I know it's a questions about tense and not dative cases, sorry about that.

                  January 19, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  Hast du dem GroßVater geschreiben?

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sundroplet

                  What about "will you write to grandpa?" ? Or is that more informal/implied/plain weird?

                  March 23, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menderic130135

                  Schreibst du dem Großvater ? Do you write the grandfather

                  This is what actually popped up. I know it's wrong, i don't know much German yet, but i know this is wrong. Do you write them grandfather? "Write you them Grandfather" Is how i translate it without grammatical purpose. so The frickle?

                  August 3, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  “Dem” does not mean “them”. It is the Dative case form of “the” for a masculine singular noun. It is used because the grandfather is the indirect object in this sentence. https://easy-deutsch.de/en/nouns/cases/

                  If you were asking Grandfather “do you write them? that would be “Schreibst du ihnen?”

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenJame461967

                  Why is this dem and not den?

                  September 14, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  “dem” is for Dative case and indirect objects are in dative case. “Den” is for Accusative case, such as the direct object. https://easy-deutsch.de/en/nouns/cases/

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeDarkLord

                  Why not "Schreibst du zu dem Großvater"? Is it common to omit prepositions in certain cases?

                  How do we distinguish between:

                  "Are you writing to the grandfather" vs "Are you writing "the grandfather""

                  I understand that in written text, the double quotes would clear things up, but what about in spoken language?

                  January 21, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  That would be wrong in German. They never use the preposition “to” to show the indirect object. Instead they require the Dative form “dem”. https://easy-deutsch.de/en/nouns/cases/

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimetoEnglish

                  If you're familiar with old English, it's easy to pick up certain phrases

                  March 18, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinjaPeanut

                  I got it wrong yet i said it right??!!!

                  May 15, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasSobey

                  I had translated it as "Are you writing to grandfather?" as i had forgotten about the 'dem' and still got it correct. Is that actually correct as well?

                  May 30, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  Yes, in English word order can tell you that the indirect object always comes before the direct object (which is not mentioned here) and only when it comes after the direct object do we need to put “to”

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaomiMisora21

                  Would "schreibst du zum Großvater" work too???

                  July 8, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YaraAbuAis

                  why dem don den ? .. and were is the indirect object ?

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  “dem Großvater” is the indirect object. “Do you write to the grandfather?” but if we name the direct object you may see “Do you write your grandfather a letter every week?” So we don’t have to use “to” for the indirect object when it comes before the direct object. “dem” has the Dative case ending for a masculine noun and is used for indirect objects. “den” has the Accusative case ending for masculine noun. “a letter” would be the direct object and would be in the Accusative case. So in German my example sentence would be “Schreibst du dem Großvater den Brief jede Woche?” This is strictly to show you the indirect and direct objects in Dative and Accusative cases. https://easy-deutsch.de/en/nouns/cases/

                  August 28, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyEx

                  Why is grandfather in the dative. How does this sentence even have the dative case. There is only "you" nominative and grandfather "accusative" That would be den grossvater, not dem grossvater????

                  October 3, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  The grandfather is not what you are writing and is not the Accusative. The grandfather is receiving what you are writing, so the grandfather is Dative. Perhaps it is a letter. You don’t have to say what you are writing to know that there is something written.

                  October 4, 2018

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Proffit6

                  why not "zum" instead of just "dem"

                  March 10, 2019

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jake452694

                  Schreiben can be a dative verb

                  April 8, 2019

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

                  'Writing to grandfather?' should be accepted surely?

                  July 1, 2019

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

                  No, you skipped “ Are you...”

                  July 1, 2019
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