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"I had already formed a group."

Translation:Yo ya había formado un grupo.

5 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lamedica

Why couldn't ya come first

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeauB
BeauB
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I put the same, still not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/libbyonmylabel

why is the following not acceptable? Yo había formado un grupo ya

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chadrichards12

It should be. Ya can be placed at the beginning or end of the sentence.

.... And apparently ??? After the subject and before the verb. hmmm..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tecalai

Generally speaking, the adverbs are placed next to the verbs, either before or after. In English we tend to separate them as often as not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

How come you can omit 'Yo'? Había can be used with He, she and it as well. I thought if the subject isn't clear by both speaker and listener, you had to include the subject?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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You are not required to include the subject, but may include it for clarification or for emphasis. Generally, if you are dealing with a sentence in context, you want the meaning to be clear, so you will use the subject if you think the meaning might be ambiguous.

In many/most cases, however, the subject will be clear in context, even if the construction is grammatically ambiguous. Duolingo allows us to treat the sentence as if it was appearing in context, where the meaning might be clear even if the pronoun is not included. This is a good thing, because we need to get used to constructions where the subject is implicit, rather than explicit, before we encounter Spanish in Immersion or in the wild.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jurekcy1

"Ya había formado un equipo" was not accepted...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ryanhull321

From what I learned in my Spanish classes (which I took for seven years), "equipo" is much more often translated to "team" as opposed to "group."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

We are going to call them The Beatles.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IdanK.
IdanK.
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Is it common to omit the subject?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Very common indeed. More often than not.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jordan918324

Ja

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hugomcn
hugomcn
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Why not hubo? it was an action at or by a point in time?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Because that's not how you form the past perfect in Spanish. See: https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/past-perfect-forms-and-uses.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeLanzarote

How come in these sentences we dont use the present perfect? Is it just preterite?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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"Had formed" is past perfect. Present perfect would be "have formed."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyberlingual

i put "había ya formado un grupo" and it worked

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyS.901342

I accidentally typed formada instead of formado and the correction told me to use creeado instead. I notice Duolingo does this a lot, one wrong letter in a word that it would otherwise accept, and they will tell you to use a completely different word instead of just fixing your one wrong letter.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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I think Duolingo uses some translation service (like Google Translate) to suggest alternate sentences. Sometimes they're spot on and sometimes way off. When in doubt, check the version at the top of the sentence discussion.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, the suggested answers are picked from the list of accepted answers for the sentence. There's no automatic translation happening, but still sometimes the suggestions are a bit awkward. The moderators are pretty lenient with adding new answers.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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I was evidently not clear what I was referring to. The suggested answers that appear at the side are sometimes off the wall or appear to reflect what the system thinks you were aiming for, rather than the sentence in the sentence discussion. (For instance, they might use the wrong verb conjugation, because your error is closer to that conjugation that to the conjugation in the given sentence.)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I know what you were referring to, but I mainly drilled into your "translation service" comment.

I'm not exactly sure how the picking of the "correct answer" works. It seems like Duo is picking the answer from its correct-answer list that best matches the (wrong) answer that you gave, so that (a) it has to replace only one word, and (b) it looks for a sentence where the highest number of initial words match with your answer.

For example you're asked to translate "I walk on the street" and you write "Camino en el calle", it will try to replace calle with a masculine noun instead of just replacing el with la.

The programming seems to work the way that it throws a wrong word out completely and replaces it with the one from the "correct answer" it picked, but it doesn't try to match singular words. If you write, for the above example, "Camina en la calle" instead, it will throw out the camina completely and may replace it with ando, even though camino is also an accepted answer.

I guess this method makes for a good balance of feedback value (the learner can see where the problem is) versus runtime. You certainly notice how it takes a lot longer to grade a wrong answer than a correct one, since it has to check all available answers for a match, and then maybe go through the list again (since it doesn't find a match) to find a close match for a correction instead. If it were to check the individual words, that time would increase a lot.

But I'm not sure exactly how the picking process is done. There is certainly one "preferred answer" (or multiple, I've heard), one of which is written at the top of the comment page. But, to my experience, those don't have any priority over the other answers when it comes to replacing just one word in your answer. Maybe the suggested correction is the first in the list that matches the criteria I outlined above. Maybe it's the last one. Maybe it's random (though this is unlikely from a programming perspective).

The "preferred answers" are shown if you mess up your sentence completely, though (which I think happens when you get two or more words wrong).

4 months ago