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"Ik ken de vrouw niet."

Translation:I do not know the woman.

3 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/daniele.maccari

Could this have been phrased as ik ken geen de vrouw?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KVHtb1GX
KVHtb1GX
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no, you use the word "geen" when you can put a number in its place.

ik ken een (1) vrouw --> ik ken geen vrouw (then you do not know a woman and that is a different meaning than "I do not know the woman")

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--Rubu--

What is the difference between "geen" and niet, exactly?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KVHtb1GX
KVHtb1GX
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you use the word "geen" when you can put a number in its place.

ik ken een (1) vrouw --> ik ken geen vrouw (then you do not know a woman and that is a different meaning than "I do not know the woman")

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarksAaron
MarksAaronPlus
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"Geen" is used with a noun, "niet" is used with a verb. In Dutch, it's common to phrase a lot of negative statements involving an indefinite verbal object by negating the object. So where in English we'd say "I don't see a bird", in Dutch it'd be phrased as "I see no bird".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

"I know the woman not", while not standard English, is still completely acceptable. But not accepted here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Would you have written it like that if it were not for Dutch word order?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

Sure. It's not that weird.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I've honestly not heard anyone from any anglophone country produce this word order other than facetiously.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

Ducky from NCIS says things like that and he is Scottish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

I'm sure there's a lot of things you've never experienced that are completely valid.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Valid statement. Questionable intent. I consider this soft trolling like the gentleman who wanted 'I'm going well' to be included.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Really? The way I learned it that is not acceptable and I have never heard anything close to that by any English native speaker I know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

You should read more Shakespeare.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gatycon
Gatycon
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In what world is it acceptable to speak to people in Shakespearean English in modern times? That's as ridiculous as saying it would be acceptable to say 'forsooth' and call people 'thou'. It's archaic and out of date, and thus not acceptable in modern English.

Regardless, this section is for helping people understand the Dutch sentences they're learning, not for making esoteric claims about high-level English. I don't think anyone wants to read about this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

Hell, go look up some Nirvana lyrics. Just because it's more poetic than mainstream, doesn't mean it's "archaic and out of date" or "not acceptable in modern English".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim784092

Just admit that you were wrong and move on....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

Wow. Way to be intolerant.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

Given that many modern English words were invented by Shakespeare, I'd have to say what you've just said demonstrates a lack of understanding of the topic. However, Shakespeare was merely one example. So arguing against one example to say it proves a rule is just as ridiculous.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Could you tell me where in any of the works of Shakespeare that phrase can be found? The internet seems to suggest that that combination of words is not present in any of his works.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

Oh jeez. Pick one. Hamlet: "Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be". Julius Caesar: "You know not what you do". Merchant of Venice: "In sooth, I know not why I am so sad"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

You seem to be completely missing the concept of language here. The specific verb doesn't matter so much as the acceptable structure used. Hell, it doesn't even have to be any version of the verb "to know".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

Also, see Macbeth.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Maybe that's the problem, in all your examples it translates to 'weten'.

we know what we are, but know not.... - wij weten wat we zijn, maar weten niet...

You know not what you do - Jij weet niet wat je doet

I know not why I am so sad - Ik weet niet waarom ik zo verdrietig ben

This sentence is: Ik ken de vrouw niet - I don't know the woman. Using 'weten', would not be acceptable in this case.

'Kennen' en 'weten' have different meanings.

Apart from that 'I know the woman not' is not present in any of the works by Shakespeare.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

It really doesn't have to be a woman.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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In all those examples not follows the verb not the object.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

Or if you prefer the subject to be before the negation, Macbeth: "My countryman, but yet I know him not."

3 years ago