https://www.duolingo.com/eldestcarroll

"Je suis facile"

You might want to remove this one. "I am easy" or "She is easy" is inappropriate in English.

When you say someone is "easy" it means that they're easy to have sex with, they don't have standards. It's like calling someone a whore.

"I'm up for sex with anybody" is probably not what you intended to convey.

November 28, 2012

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Remy
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Thanks for your feedback, this sentence has been changed into:

"Est-ce facile ?" which translates into: "Is it easy?"

November 28, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/eldestcarroll

Much better. :)

December 9, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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If someone says "je suis facile", to not be misunderstood (same sex connotation as in English) he or she will add "à vivre" (easy to live with). The change announced by Remy will make it easier (!) for every new learner.

November 28, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/1km
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In British English, "To be easy" does not mean the same as "To be [of] easy [virtue]". Look in the Oxford English Dictionary.

November 29, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/eldestcarroll

That's all well and good, but British English is not the only English that matters. American English is just as valid. I could also find a dictionary to support me. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/easy definition 12.

December 7, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/1km
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That's not really my point (I am North American, but have lived in Europe for many years btw). The pejoration of words happens in all cultures to a greater or lesser extent, so where do we draw the line on a learning resource that is supposed to teach the meaning of different languages?

If a friend asks me whether I would rather go out for dinner, or eat in, am I no longer allowed to say: "I'm easy", in case that is misinterpreted by someone from the US as an invitation for casual sex?

Should we not learn French nouns like "la vache", "le paillason", "la queue", "le chat", "la morue", or verbs like "tomber", "sauter", "jouir" or "bander", in case a more sophisticated native speaker choses to twist the generally accepted meanings?

December 7, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/1km
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Oops, Duolingo has just messed up my formatting and I am no longer able to edit it!

Edit / delete - found it, hidden away.

December 7, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/eldestcarroll

I'm not saying that the word "easy" should be banned, and I'm not saying it shouldn't be taught. Don't twist my words.

In French, and also, I take it, in the English of Europe, "She is easy" means "She is easy to live with."

In American English, it means, "She is easy to have sex with". This is not just a double entendre, this is literally the only thing it means to me. It's not like, "he's hot", where it could be construed as harmless or as sexual. In the town I live in, when easy refers to a person, it is always an insult.

The only reason I bring this up is the possibility for confusion. It would be confusing for everyone if an American learning French got offended over being called "facile", or a French person learning English (if the site ever makes that happen) accidentally called a good American friend promiscuous.

In conclusion, you seem kind of mad at me and I wasn't trying to make you mad, can you please tell me what I did wrong?

December 7, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/1km
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I'm not mad with you and I'm sorry to give you that impression.

December 7, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/smeylie

same in french, its innapropriate!

April 9, 2013
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