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  5. "An stáisiún meitreo."

"An stáisiún meitreo."

Translation:The metro station.

February 12, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mplarner

Except not in Ireland... They don't have any!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Searlasmane

They'll start building the Dublin Metro in 2020 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin_Metro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vacuousWastrel

Spoiler: they did not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katastrophe423

So is this a loan word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

They both are in both languages — stáisiún and “station” from a Latin root, meitreo and “metro” from a Greek root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzxj

What does metro mean here? Is it any sort of train/bus station?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait48

In lots of places, it's the subway. In Seattle, we do not have subways, but our bus system is called Metro, so a "Metro station" would take you to a bus station.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

It's a subway station. They call subway systems the "metro" in a lot of places.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TuathaDeDanann

I was going to ask the same question... I've never seen a subway before. I am from a pretty rural area. Looks like I'm learning some English today as well as Irish. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyJ96

It seems like in Spanish: "Estación de metro"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConnieKetchum

In San Francisco and surrounding areas we have the BART Bay Area Rapid Transit. Long word for Metro system


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

I see "metro" defined as "subway" = "an underground metropolitan railway" elsewhere in these comments. Any American visitors to the UK might want to know that this is not what the local mean by "subway".

a subway is an underground pedestrian passage to enable people to cross a busy city road. A metro is an integrated urban transport system organised around buses and trains. Except in London, of course, where Transport for London is the body that looks after the road system, the buses and the urban trains. The trains are both underground and overground, but are commonly called "the underground" (never the metro) or "the tube". I had occasion to help out a very nonplussed American in London some years ago. He was searching the underground map for "Lie-sester-shyer" Square. I directed him to Leicester Square (pronounced Lester). He thanked me and toddled off, shaking his head at "these crazy Brits".

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