Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Veel appels komen uit Nederland."

Translation:Many apples come from the Netherlands.

1
3 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

I don't think 'many apples come from the Netherlands'. I looked on Wikipedia and the Netherlands is the 34th country with apple production. What the hell am I talking about???

24
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

This sentence is no more true than the ones about insects reading etc.

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
  • 19
  • 12
  • 9
  • 2

One fifteenth of the world's apples, according to this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlands#Agriculture

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Yours is Wikipedia too! But I think maybe the Netherlands import more in the import business part...but in production it's in the 34th position...according to this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_apple_production

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olyakorikosha

are you serious guys?!! c'mon i'm more concerned he pronounces 'nederland' as 'nederlands' - with clear 's' sounding be that regular or slow version

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Not every comment on Duolingo is serious...sometimes we need to take it easy :)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olyakorikosha

smile never left me from reading the first comment which is great:)

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DougNL

It doesn't matter where the apples come from. It is an exercise in sentence construction

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RubenFGDS
RubenFGDS
  • 14
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8

Difference between uit and van (from)?

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

It's like aus and von in German

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PowerBoyAakash

You got my tongue! Same question here.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoazTepper
BoazTepper
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Good question. I am Dutch myself and I would say:

IN GENERAL uit - when you come from a certain country, or leave some place, or come out of a lower place (like a pit) van - when you come from another place then a country, or come from a higher place (like a mountain)

And there are some idiom combinations you have to learn like 'uit huis gaan' (when somebody leaves home to have a living for themselves, for example when studying) or 'van ver' (from far).

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schildpad2

Why is 'Lots of apples come out of Holland' wrong?

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

I know many people say Holland when they talk about the Netherlands but technically speaking Holland is only a part of the Netherlands. Since this is a Dutch course we only use the Netherlands as that is the name of the country. It's like using:

  • England instead of the United Kingdom
  • America instead of the United States of America
  • Flanders instead of Belgium
  • etc.
14
Reply22 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schildpad2

Bedankt!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilijaVel3

Heel is for adjectives and veel for nouns so heel veel appels means too much or a lot

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlperSngl

Why "veel" but not "vele"? Shouldn't it be: "Vele appels komen uit Nederland" ? Appels is plural so it is a de-word. So I would propose "vele" is better. Any opinions?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lottedb1404

"Veel" and "Vele" are both correct, 'vele' is more formal. Most people in The Netherlands use 'veel', and thats probably why 'veel' is correct and 'vele' isn't. The most common translation of many is 'veel'.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlperSngl

Bedankt voor het antwoord :)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tallguy007

"arrive from"? whats wrong with that?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoazTepper
BoazTepper
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

With 'komen uit Nederland' is meant normally an origin, not a delivery. :)

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tallguy007

Your name comes from my country

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoazTepper
BoazTepper
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

You live in Israel?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tallguy007

From Israel but don't live there now.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoazTepper
BoazTepper
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Ah, okay! I study theology and I know my name is Hebrew :)! Bet-ayen-zayen, 'In Him is power'

1
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoazTepper
BoazTepper
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Btw, I'm Dutch myself, so don't look to that '3' for indicating my Dutch skills :)

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lottedb1404

Arrive is mostly translated als aankomen, not als komen

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkJasper5

I don't think this should be wrong for omitting the word "the" because the meaning is the same without it.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

The country is called the Netherlands, so yes, omitting the is wrong.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aditya983799

It sounds like "A lot of apples are coming out of the Netherlands" Komen=coming?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathanJeugmans

In the sentence we clearly hear "NederlandS" (he pronounces the 'S'). So which is right? With or Without the 'S'??

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
Mod
  • 24
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6

It is without the s in this sentence. (I cannot hear the 's'.)

Nederland = The Netherlands
Nederlands = Dutch

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathanJeugmans

Ok, I understand better. The pronunciation sounded like an 's' to me but I think it's the 'd' that's pronounced differently than I'd expect. Thanks for your reply !

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanKing1
StanKing1
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 7

Yes, the terminal D in this computer speech has a bit of "sibilance", as an audio engineer would say.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

It's a Dutch thing, the d at the end of a word is sounds generally a bit like a t: http://www.heardutchhere.net/DutchPronunciation.html.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanKing1
StanKing1
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 7

Indeed. My comment was more addressed to the computer implementation, which puts on some sibilance, sounding like a bit of air escaping. It could be an artifact of the text-to-speech, or if it's a recording of a real person, the compression algorithm.

0
1 year ago