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"It is very common."

Translation:Es muy común.

2
3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Oh, it does make me laugh ... and hopefully that improves my chances of remembering the phrase.

It was another spoken translation.
I said (as best I could): "Es muy común" ... twice!
DL said: We heard "Es bastante ordinario."

Wow! That stretches the imagination as to how we got from the former to the latter! But I have learned an alternative that I might not have discovered easily otherwise.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jessawms

I also said "Es muy común" but DL heard "Es muy corriente" and marked it correct. I learned a new word, too!

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

It "heard" me say "Es demasiado común," when I said "muy." HA!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

I am having trouble getting the "check" button and the "continue" button (same button, different names) to advance...so it is a frustrating experience. Plodding on anyway but who do we report these problems to? It started when they revamped the system, when it also began to take much longer to load the discussion pages. I A new problem arose also: my fingers seem confused between languages and English seems to befuddle them also when typing. This could be a migraine sx but it seems to have to do with adding spanish to my brain circuits.
The "check" and "continue" buttons tho are new problems where only a tiny area of them works at all.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I suggest you try a different browser. I too had problems when the system was changed. After trying a few things I eventually stopped using Firefox and went back to Internet Explorer. I still have no "speaking" exercises, but I seem to have all the other functions working OK.

1
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

That is an idea. I am so not a computer person but will ask my spouse to fix the 100th thing....It's sad that before the improvements, it worked wonderfully well and quickly and now is slow and boggy.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanny118
Jeanny118
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What is wrong with "está"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

'es' is for basic traits of something. If something is 'very common,' commonality is a basic trait

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sds59600

Exactly. Esta would imply a temporary trait :)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It's actually not that simple.

DOCTOR PLACE

Use ser for:
Description
Occupation
Characteristics
Time
Origin
Relationships

Use estar for:
Position
Location
Action
Condition
Emotion

10
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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This is very helpful. Thank you.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Ahhhh...how I appreciate this.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Junius76
Junius76
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I wrote "Esto es muy común.", and the DL did not accepted it.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SunnySimantov

Esto = this. "it is" = es.

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catherine.539406

Does comun carry the conotation of "cheap and lower class", as it does in British English?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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It can mean common, ordinary, joint (held in common), usual, or common folk (gente común). If you want to refer to people as "commoners" in a more British sense, then you would use plebeyos (from Latin plebeius "Plebeians"). "Cheap" goods would be called barato/a (dirt-cheap) or mezquino/a (shabby or, of people, miserly). I don't think they use barato in a negative context as much as we do with cheap, probably because a lot of Spanish-speaking countries are poor. However, I have heard McDonald's described as comida barata (cheap food) in a negative sense or porquería barata (cheap trash).

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyNachoLibre

Why not vulgar? I like its esoteric connotations...

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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That would be vulgar in Spanish. It's close, but also has connotations of debased or obscene, while común does not.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyNachoLibre

I disagree. I enjoy tracing all these words back to Latin...and "common" is absolutely debased and obscene. Take a look at catherine.539406's comment.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWycliffe
JohnWycliffe
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I enjoy tracing etymologies, too, but just because vulgaris meant "common" in Latin doesn't mean "vulgar" is the best translation of Spanish común. Remember that it's vulgar in Spanish, too, if you're going for the "obscene" meaning - so English "vulgar" is a better translation of Spanish vulgar. Común does not mean "obscene" or "debased" etc. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/com%C3%BAn

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyNachoLibre

It's gutter latin. I'm not suprised that the original meaning of common has come to be blunted. I concede your point in that common has now been replaced by ordinary...if you don't catch the figurative sense in what I just said; of well. It's a popular language...common that is. The same thing is currently happening to english. If you were to call someone common in the united states, they might smile and slap you on the back. Call someone common in england and get some hot tea in your face.

Take a look at the second tier of the definition you gave me. Comun as an adjective-

4.) Ordinario, vulgar

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LSadun
LSadun
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What is wrong with "Es muy frequente"?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebastian822

couldn't it also be "Es bien común"

0
Reply11 months ago