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https://www.duolingo.com/Cruise2525

Differences between Duolingo and Native Speakers

I cal the icons on the screen chapters because some have more lessons than others. Actually I am able to practice the Spanish lessons with my mother. The last few times we practiced lessons together we reviewed the general review without the timer and then the household and occupations chapters. I do try to write to her in Spanish from time to time. So far she has corrected me on the usage of "a mi in front of me gusto, agricultura for farmer, and calcetines for socks belonging to infants or toddlers. She also corrects my pronunciation. This is where it's really helpful to have somebody who speaks the foreign language fluently. The other reason is that the fluent person speaks the spoken language rather than the formal language. Sometimes they will say something is wrong. I don't know if it's wrong or if it's just used in a different region or perhaps in a different context. When I speak to her, I say it the way she requests.

3 years ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

One of my teachers likes to say that three kinds of words vary the most from region to region: food, slang, and curses. (Actually, I think slang and curses might be one category, in which case I've forgotten the third.)

But totally, other categories vary as well. Where is your mother from?

More examples:

In Mexico, "homework" is "tarea." In Spain, it's "deberes."

PS: I appreciate the additions to the post. If you want more discussion, I think a more informative post title would be "differences between Duo and native speakers" or something like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruise2525

Another difference is in pronunciation. For example, some pronounce "ll" as "ly, and "y" My mother uses "ly" and my Spanish teacher at school pronounced the "ll" as "y". My mother leaves the "g" silent and pronounces the "j" as a "g". I have friends in South America who pronounce the "g" and "j" differently. My mother is from Puerto Rico. I had a Spanish teacher who was from Mexico. As for cursing and impolite commands, they resulted in extra homework, standing in the corner, writing sentences on the blackboard, sending notes to be signed by parents, or worst of all, a visit to the principal's office. I had to write a letter to my parents when my class misbehaved for a substitute teacher. Another student told the teacher we didn't have any homework and nobody came to her defense. I was corrected about the "ll" and "rr". In some countries, the "rr" is pronounced as a "th" rather than rolled.

3 years ago