"He makes two orders."

Translation:Han laver to ordrer.

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
  • 24
  • 16
  • 9
  • 8
  • 4

Does is it mean that he places orders for goods or services; or that he orders people around?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RidderJakob

Goods and services

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
  • 24
  • 16
  • 9
  • 8
  • 4

Thank you. The meaning is this sentence is apparent but what I meant by the question is whether the word can serve in both meanings like it does in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RidderJakob

If you want to order people around, you need to use the word 'at beordre' (be+ordre).

"Jeg beordrer dig til at sige hej til musen"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
  • 24
  • 16
  • 9
  • 8
  • 4

OK, that's the verb. My question is how do you call the thing you give when you order people. In English the noun and the verb are the same (an order - to order) but the noun has many meanings (1) request for goods or services (like in this sentence), (2) a command, (3) a correct way of things (to be in order), (4) a group of people (Masonic order) etc. You've said there's a difference between the verb and the first meaning of the noun. My question is if the Danish has a different word for the second English meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RidderJakob

Oh now I see, sorry!

'En ordre' also has the second English meaning you presented. I read it in context the first time I answered. You wouldn't say "Jeg laver en ordre", when you mean to order someone to do something. If you ask someone to do something, you don't use the word in the request, but mention afterwards that it's an order.

"Vask dit tøj" = "Wash your clothes"

...

"Det er en ordre" = "It's an order"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
  • 24
  • 16
  • 9
  • 8
  • 4

Thank you RidderJakob!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
PeterStockwellPlus
  • 25
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 16
  • 10
  • 1279

Once again, the English sentence is odd, should be places or fills, no ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
  • 22
  • 20
  • 16
  • 67

It's also slightly odd in Danish, so it fits. :)
Afgive would be the better verb here.

6 months ago
Learn Danish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.