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https://www.duolingo.com/Cruise2525

Rolling Rs in Spanish

What sentences did you practice to learn how to roll Rs? I found this so difficult. My mother did teach my to take my tongue and rub it against my palate and the back of my front teeth. She told me to take a breath just before I say the word. Sometimes I can do a hard roll but I can't do it consistently. At one point I got frustrated with myself and stopped Spanish for a while and then I came back to Duolingo. i started on French before I realized that i could do more than one language.

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/catchingsignals
catchingsignals
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I can do it now, though not well, but better than at the beginning when I couldn't do it AT ALL. Some pointers you may find helpful:

  • You don't actually vibrate your tongue itself. If you put your tongue in the right place, with its tip touching the right spot, and relax, it's the air you blow out that vibrates the tongue. It took a long time for me to learn to relax my tongue.
  • Think of the sound people make when they are saying to each other how cold it is. "Rrrrrr... it's so cold!!!" If you can do that, that's the one.
  • I find it helpful to think of the rolling r as leading in from the syllable before. So, say with "carretera": it's carrrrrrr-etera. I start preparing for the rolling r from the syllable before, and try to get the transition smooth.
  • From what I've read about this, apparently there are some native Spanish speakers who can't do it either, so don't let it bother you too much.
  • There are quite a few videos on Youtube of people giving various advice on how to do this. Watch a few of them and see what works for you and what you can pick up! Some will show you where to place the tip of your tongue for the trill.
  • It took me months. I can't explain what changed, except my tongue started relaxing more maybe, and I started finding the right place to put the tip of my tongue. Still not great, but I do have a trilling r now, and it may take many more months before I get one that feels completely natural. (And I've noticed recently, if I don't trill the r for a while it gets harder again, so maybe it's a muscle thing?) Keep trying and don't give up, but definitely don't let it put you off Spanish either -- there's so much more to a language than one sound!
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catchingsignals
catchingsignals
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Oh and as for how to practise: arra erre irri orro urru -- the vowels! They all feel a bit different, going into and coming out of the trilling r.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrookeLorren
BrookeLorren
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"From what I've read about this, apparently there are some native Spanish speakers who can't do it either, so don't let it bother you too much."

That's interesting to know. I can't really do it. I think that it could be due to the fact that I was born with a tongue tie.

I can produce understandable Spanish, even without the Rs... so I'm not too concerned about it.

Don't let not being able to produce a certain sound keep you away from a language. You can make yourself understood even without the rolling R :-).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtaraxianSpa

I found a good word to practice the r's on is pararrayos, lightning rod. It's important that you aren't letting the air escape under the tounge, channel it all through the roof of the mouth. And the tip of the tounge should be lightly touching the palate when you slide it forward. Do this, and physics should take over.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Denfisksson

You can also listen to the first third of this song, where all the words start with R (so they are rolled Rs) :P

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BH1I9iPIvKw

~00:28

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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I worked daily for six months on the word "caro". You have already made the sound, so you know you can do it. That is great. Just keep practicing and you will be able to do it consistently and on demand.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kastreitor
Kastreitor
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3yw02eZdgs

El perro de san Roque no tiene rabo porque Ramón Ramirez se lo ha robado.

(=Saint Roque's dog hasn´t tail because Ramón Ramirez has stolen it).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruise2525

I read your sentence to my mother correctly. As for the other post, I'm amazed that this artist can sing so many words with that sound one after another and in rhythm without getting tongue-tied. Some people can do it very easily, especially along with a beat and melody. Rhythm never came easily to me even when my teacher required a metronome with the piano.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kastreitor
Kastreitor
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"El perro de san Roque" is a classic Spanish "trabalenguas" (=tongue-twister).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/corbiltay

i practiced using the word "three".I still need lots of practice but I find if I warm up by saying "three" over and over until i am ready it makes it easier for me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9eN2B7Wj68

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kb4306

I can't roll my R's. I could when I was a kid, but for some reason, it's like I lost the ability. I'm focusing on German right now but I still practice sometimes. I'm considering Spanish next, so I want to be able to.

3 years ago