"Ik ben vrolijk omdat mijn fiets niet werd gestolen."

Translation:I am happy because my bicycle was not stolen.

4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dunapartyboy
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Why is "I am happy that my bike was not stolen" not accepted, only "I am happy because..." is? Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marae19
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Because of the word 'omdat'. The reason that this I person is happy, is that their bike wasn't stolen. They stayed happy for a while afterwards. If the sentence would have been 'Ik ben blij dat mijn fiets niet werd gestolen', then the correct translation would be that, because then they're glad their bike wasn't stolen, but it didn't change a lot about their mood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nateonthenet

These two sentences are essentially synonymous in English - "happy that" and "happy because" mean the same thing.

Edit: ...in this sentence, they would mean the same thing. See my clarification below.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
Mod
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They are not synonymous.

  • I am happy that... - indicates that you are happy with the fact that the bicycle wasn't stolen.
  • I am happy because - indicates that you are happy due to the fact that the bicycle wasn't stolen.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nateonthenet

They are functionally synonymous. In every case where you are happy "because of" something, you can also state that you are happy with/about the fact that the state is now what it is.

The opposite isn't strictly true (you can't assume "because" for every "that"), but this sentence is a "because of" sentence, so I stand by my assertion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mossyrock89

The sense differs, albeit only ever so slightly. I would say that if one says that they are "happy that" their bike wasn't stolen, it means that they are pleased that it wasn't stolen, but if they say they are "happy because" it implies that their actual current emotional state of happiness is caused directly by the bike not being stolen. That is to say that it would be reasonable to say "I'm happy that my bike wasn't stolen." whilst in a terrible mood, but not "I'm happy because my bike wasn't stolen." As I say, it's subtle but their is a difference. It's also worth noting that the meaning of the word "omdat" is more specific than simply the meaning of "because"; it's a certain kind of because, used in situations where one wants specifically state a reason for something being the case (but not objective reasoning about facts - doordat, nor arguments over difference of opinion - want).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
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https://www.duolingo.com/Dunapartyboy
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In this case the difference is obvious, but it has to do with the context. With the bike example both versions should work, as mentioned by others as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcarlosmjr
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Wat is het verschil tussen vrolijk en gelukkig?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
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Vrolijk is a happy mood, gelukkig is a state of happiness, being content with your life.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcarlosmjr
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Thank you once again!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeccaLynn91

What is the difference between vrolijk and blij?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eekhondje
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Vrolijk is only a mood. With blij you can also say "Ik ben blij om te horen dat" (I'm happy to hear that...) for example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kache
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Does it happen as often in the Netherlands as it happens in Belgium?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
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Disclaimer: I didn't look up any numbers for the following text, it's purely based on my gut feeling and my experience living in the Netherlands and visiting Belgium. The Dutch bike a lot more, and have more bikes, so more bikes will be stolen. But if you normalise it by number of kilometres biked or number of bikes owned, my guess is there won't be shocking differences. Maybe a bit higher in the Netherlands (I expect there to be more organised bike theft as there is a bigger 'pool' for thieves).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
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can we use 'not has been stolen'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helloquent-Gent

I wouldn't use that construction. "Has not been stolen," is how the negation of "not" is best used here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
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but 'has not been stolen' can used in stead of 'not stolen' as well?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helloquent-Gent

No, My apologies. "Not stolen" only. I argued "has not been stolen" with a moderator and could not convince her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
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ok thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leigh124125

Wat is het verschil tussen gelukkig en tevreden?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Egard-X
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Couldn't it be frolic?

1 year ago
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