1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Swedish
  4. >
  5. "The baby wants to go to his …

"The baby wants to go to his mom."

Translation:Spädbarnet vill till sin mamma.

February 14, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cynyork

Is the verb just understood here? Or is vill a verb on its own and not only a helping verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Very late answer to this question, but in Swedish, we very often say vill + direction or goal, to indicate that we want to get somewhere without specifying how we'll get there.
Jag vill hem 'I want to go home'
Most likely a verb of motion is understood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dantedante19

Very common in Germanic languages..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CXCondit

Don't really grasp why "åka" is inappropriate here. Certain verbs can be omitted, but the pattern escapes me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

I wrote a long explanation about this here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5884363


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewYung

Is 'vill' more appropriate here than 'vill ha' because it's not a living object, so to speak?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

vill when you want to verb and vill ha when you want a noun.
More info in this thread: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5892480


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bittercress

Why not "bebisen vill till sin mamma"? I understand "komma" works, but feels more like "come", rather than "go", to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

In Swedish, would mean "walk", which seems unlikely since it's a baby. Rather, the phrase is about where the baby ends up, and komma can be used for that in similar contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laureyy_

Why is it 'sin' here and not 'sitt'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It's because mamma is an en word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plentbeest

Does it work like that? Spädbarnets mamma and Spädbarnet sin mamma? I'm surprised, I thought the sin/sitt would relate to ett barn and therefore be sitt...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, Swedish always works like that. Possessive pronouns and articles agree with that which they are describing.

Otherwise, what would even be the point of e.g. mina? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plentbeest

Makes perfect sense. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cristina144710

Spädbarnet vill gå till sin mamma. Det är fel. Varför?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

means to walk, which such small babies as spädbarn cannot do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cristina144710

Ok. Men " Hunden vill gå till sin vän" stämmer det?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sure, that might work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NatalieBoa3

So I guess it's like saying "The baby wants his mother" in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Yes, exactly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yama842603

I think „The baby wants to get to his mom.” might be a more percise translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Possibly, but I'd translate that as komma till instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

Is it acceptable to translate the English sentence as: "Spädbarnet vill ha sin mamma"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's perfectly natural Swedish, but much close to just "the baby wants his/her mother" than the version with "to go to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

Thank you for your answer, but if "ett spädbarn" cannot "gå till sin mamma", why can an English baby wants to go to his mom"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Swedish gå isn't very versatile - it explicitly means "walk" in some way. But English "go" is much more versatile and doesn't really have that restriction in practice. So they don't quite literally translate one-to-one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

Thank you, I understand now. I was a little bit irritated, because a Swedish and an English baby would presumably have the same ability to walk. (-;

Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.