Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/yo_soycapo

What do native Spanish speakers do if they cannot roll the r?

yo_soycapo
  • 11
  • 9
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

What do native speakers of Spanish do when for some reason or another, they cannot roll their r´s? I´ve seen that many speakers in South America make a zh sound like in the English word measure (I know that with most in South America it is a matter of dialect rather than speech problem, but I´ve met some who have the problem too). Is it the same for native speakers in Spain who can´t roll their rs/pronounce the alveolar trill correctly? Gracias.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Justin558363
Justin558363
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3

The "zh sound" used in South America, specifically in the Rio de la Plata region (Argentina, Uruguay) is a common way to pronounce "y"/ "ll" in that dialect, so it doesn't have to do with r.

Unfortunately, most dialects of Spanish pronounce "rr" with the trill. The only exception I can think of off the top of my head is a few dialects in Puerto Rico that replace the trill with the "j" sound, (so "carro" sounds like "cajo").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

so "carro" sounds like "cajo"... just like Portuguese! when I was starting my learning, I heard "majom" and "cajo"; my very first thought was: "Puelto Jico" XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

Speak too quickly, speak too slowly. Cry and hide their shame in their margaritas. (Just me?) Various options. I'm Latina and I've always found it tough. I also had a speech problem with the "r" in English as a kid. Rrrrrrrrr's! [Shaking my fist!] If there is a language without "r's" that is my new favorite thing. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

The zh sound is used for "y" and "ll" sounds but just in Argentina and Uruguay. In Bolivia and Ecuador (and probably Peru) they have a distinctive rr sound.

They sound weird, For example there's people who can't pronunce the "x" (pronuncing like "ts" or "s") or the "s" (pronuncing like a "th"). My mother and a cousin couldn't roll the r when they were kids (they said caro instead of carro). Both used the same 'therapy': "¡Haz como un carro!" (make car noises!).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrcainer

There are many, many Youtube videos out there that will coach you on how to do it. I still can't but feel that I am getting closer, I can do the single 'r' so it sounds OK, but not rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr....... grrrrrrrrrrrr!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esbrianne
esbrianne
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4

I watched video after video on how to do it when I first started learning spanish and I just couldn't do it so it frustrated me soooo much. After a whole year of learning spanish something changed and I can magically do it now! It's not perfect, I'll admit, but I can do it for at least a couple of seconds and it still sounds a little sloppy in dialogue. Hopefully you will magically obtain the ability to roll your r's too! Buena suerte~

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kb4306

I was actually wondering about this myself. I was just talking about it with a friend earlier, who's for the most part, bilingual. I used to be able to roll my r's when I was a kid, despite having speech problems with the letter R in English, my native language. But I've seem to have lost the ability. It's like learning to say r's correctly, took it away!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vindicari
vindicari
  • 16
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6

Some people in Puerto Rico and another countrys don't pronounce R, it's their spanish, they pronounce L.

amoR - amoL etc.

ya tu sabe chico, XD

So, if you can pronounce, tell that you learn spanish in PR XD

3 years ago