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https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie

When studying a verb do you study all of the tenses with it?

Rozzie
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I was wonder when you study any Spanish verb do you study all 14 tenses or just the first 7 simple tense and leave the 7 compound tenses alone?

3
3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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My method of studying the verbs is as follows:

*Hack and slash every skill that has melted from being gold that day, getting at least 30 points in each one before moving to the next. Pay special attention to various verb forms.

*Write down new verbs that I come across in Immersion articles, and practice conjugating them in various ways.

*Occasionally focus on one or two specific tenses, building as many verb combinations as my brain will allow that day.


The hack-n-slash method

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

In all my years studying Spanish, I've only ever been exposed to one tense at a time, maybe three (present, past preterite, past imperfect) if the teacher's feeling fancy. When we've covered other tenses, it's been a group of verbs in that tense, rather than the other way around. I don't even have the top 200 verbs in Spanish totally memorized though, not even in the infinitive form.

Maybe it's different for native speakers?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Magalie48
Magalie48
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Normally you start with the regular verbs and you learn tense per tense. In this Spanish verb chart http://www.lingolex.com/spanver.htm the tenses in red are absolutely essential, while the tenses in blue are for more advanced learners.

¡ Mucha suerte!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomigaoka

YES... As a serious learner of Spanish, with formal study you will get the oppurtunity to study all of it in detail including the compound tenses on what are the grammar rules and when/where to use it. There is an advanced topic called DISCURSOS REFERIDOS which is kind of tricky but takes a while to master in Spanish because a certain native will have lots of ways to express himself.

One importance is you have to know who uses which. Example below.

  1. Mexico always use Pasado Simple against Presente Perfecto of Spain
  2. Mexico would say "voy a comer" instead of future simple "comere" of Spain.

But guess what, Preterito Perfecto is never used (e.g. hube/hubiste/hubo comido). Take it one step at a time you will get there. Depends on what level you want to take your Spanish.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie
Rozzie
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Thanks

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Most people learn verbs by tenses/moods rather than trying to learn a bunch of tenses at once.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruise2525

I think it's easier to start with the present subjunctive tense and then move onto either the immediate future or the past tenses. I have watched French In Action. I think they use the ones that people use the most often. I still have trouble with the imperfect tense. I'm always going back to review that section. I think having a section just about tenses might serve helpful prior to an exam or writing. Beyond that though I'm not sure. When I do travel, I want to be understood. It would be nice if I could understand the foreign language too. This is why I am mentioning that I will travel with a bi-lingual guide. If I'm in a strange unfamiliar place, I want all the help that's available from somebody who really knows the region and how to get around as well as cultural sensitivities. I will pay for that expertise too even if it costs more than going on my own. I think those who do go on their own have a spirit of adventure. For me, i like having some assistance from others. In Puerto Rico, i had assistance from my mother, uncle, aunts, and cousins even though I was on my own when I was alone for brief periods with my grandmother and grandfather. For the most part, we were altogether, or at least in the same house or place. I don't know how much English my grandparents did or did not know. I do know that they wanted us to learn Spanish. If one needs something badly enough, one will learn to ask the pertinent questions. I think I would have gotten a lot more out of the experiences had I spent a year studying Spanish before I went there.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElimGarak

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6162231 Basically, I use this same pattern, I just change the verb endings for each tense. http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/COURSES/verbs/vtenses1.pdf And I found this a few weeks ago and it is just another way of organizing the information.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Libertad54
Libertad54
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I do not have problems with verbs till now, as English Grammar is quite simple. I learn irregular verbs by heart and practise them in meaningful sentences. I have started learning French and so I am interested in this question about studying verb tenses. I think that I will learn little by little each tense first by heart and then practising it -I think that the similarities with Spanish can make it easier for me than for people who do not speak any languages derived from latin.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wildfood
wildfood
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Present, past simple, imperfect, future, and conditional are all I worry about now.

1
Reply3 years ago