"Eu tenho gostado desses filmes."

Translation:I have been enjoying those movies.

August 14, 2013

63 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/pnehls

"I have been liking those films" is that not a correct response?

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

In this case, "like" isn't used in a progressive sense. If you are eating an ice cream cone, you'd probably say " I like it," not "I am liking it." Like: stative, non-progressive verb.

April 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfSagen

Unless you're like McDonalds... "I'm lovin' it!" :-)

April 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamesalex1

I'm never wanting McDonalds.

April 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfSagen

Neither am I....doing... :-D

April 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rmacheshire

The problem is that it just sounds strange and unnatural in English, although it is not actually ungrammatical. "I liked those films" or "I did like those films" sound OK but don't quite translate the meaning of the Portuguese accurately.

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pnehls

if sounding natural was the benchmark, half the answers that are 'correct' here would be incorrect, I follow what you are saying though and I agree...

August 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Maharlikans

I don't know about that. In Miami, FL where I live, it'd be pretty fine to say, "I've been liking those films lately."

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulRobert6

Totally normal in Tennessee.

November 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/solidfunk

In Canada it would be fine. Particularly if you are talking about the movies of a particular director or genre that have been coming out. Ie: Question: What do you think of Tarantino's movies" answer: I've been liking his movies recently

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

I've liked his recent movies is probably what one hears more frequently.

The active verb to use in that sentence would be "enjoy:" 'I have been enjoying his movies."

January 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee

I don't know why you have a down vote and Solidfunk has four up votes plus a heart because you're right and he's wrong. "To like" is a stative verb and thus has no continuous form. We have to use the present perfect simple because "to like" is a stative/state verb. But I guess many native English speakers are not aware of this (shrugs shoulders).

http://random-idea-english.blogspot.com/2012/10/stative-verbs-plus.html

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

It may be the difference between teaching ESL and having to know the rules which govern standard speech as it is tested for those who want to study in the US/ UK or just speaking it colloquially. ;)

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy

Just because there is a "rule" saying something is incorrect does not mean that it is not used by many, many native speakers. For me, "liking" is okay here. I don't think I'd use it, but I also wouldn't tell someone they can't use.

February 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie.Lkl

It IS grammatically incorrect. Some verbs (including 'like') simply cannot be used in an +ing form.

May 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossito1234

I'm sorry, but I disagree with you.

If you check a verb conjugation website such as: http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-english-verb-liking.html or http://www.anglais-conjugaison.com/verbe-regulier/to+like , the Present Perfect Continuous form of 'to like' is 'have been liking'.

It's fairly common to use liking in this way, such as "I have been liking that girl for two years and still haven't asked her out on a date!" Another example is, "I have been liking those cakes that Susan has been bringing into the office every day lately. They are much nicer than Sally's cakes".

May 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Reverso is another one of the many crowd-sourcing sites in which you can see many examples of "non-standard" grammar as in your example of present perfect progressive with the stative verb: to like. Better to check out an English-usage textbook published in an English-speaking country than rely on Reverso, Linguee, etc. To quote:

"CommunityReverso is collaborative and counts on a community of members that give feedback on translations, add words and phrases to our collaborative dictionary, look at and validate other members ‘entries, vote and comment them. If you want to be part of the community and help us improve our tools, join us! Membership is totally free."

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossito1234

Ah, thanks for that, perhaps I'm wrong then.

I specifically tried to find more than one website to check but wasn't aware how poor the standards of these grammar websites are. (I've had my doubts about verbix.com for some time).

I understand what you're trying to say - I agree that the use of liking in this sense does sound awkward. However, even though it may be grammatically incorrect, I think that it's not so unusual to hear people (in England) use liking in this way nowadays, especially the example I gave about "I have been liking that girl for two years and still haven't asked her out..." I also think the Facebook 'like' concept has introduced further uses of the verb that may not be grammatically correct, though people still use them.

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dlung1

Back in third grade they had us sing a song that said, "Until the twelth of never, I'll still be needing you."

PS Isn't it interesting that this sentence in a Portuguese course is generating much more analysis of English grammar than of Portuguese grammar?

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino

It's mostly because people don't seem to want to accept that a) There are grammar rules in English, b) How you speak regionally may not necessarily adhere to these rules and more importantly, c)Duo is following these rules and using them to decide whether or not you have understood the Portuguese question.

If Duo says you're wrong, it doesn't necessarily mean you are (there are an uncountable amount of variations in English after all), it just means you're not speaking proper English, (by which I mean English as how Duo defines it). And it's not infallible either.

Duo doesn't know "the way people say it", and does not necessarily care either. If you care about the quality of your English, insisting that your regional variation is right is an exercise in futility- ALL the regional variations can make that claim with an equal amount of legitimacy, except that we can't include all of them and like you pointed out, this is the Portuguese course. For Duo to be effective it has to judge your translations against a standard, which by the nature of standards in general will exclude most (if not all) regional variations.

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Responding to your last post. Another post recently mentioned the use of "needing" in British English, so this use of progressive forms of stative verbs may be another regionalism....just as McDonald's hyper-enthusiastic advertisements of "loving" the McDonald's "dining" experience has impacted colloquial American English for some people - more than others - in different regions of the country.

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewBrow9

I think the use of like vs enjoy here is a regional preference in American English. I live in Texas and agree with the Florida and Tennessee people that liking works just fine in this phrase. For another example I would say "how have you been liking living in Texas? " Maybe some others would use enjoy here but I would always use like. I'm not saying either one is right or wrong, I'm just saying it might be a regional preference.

April 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AutumnAkin1

We would totally say "been liking" here in New Mexico. Totally normal.

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Have you looked at a grammar book lately?

August 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/BGMarc

It's worth bearing in mind that English is a living language; its grammar is not settled.

December 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/anandrules

It hardly matters what the "proper" English grammar is. First of all, this isn't supposed to be testing my understanding of English grammar. It's supposed to be teaching me a foreign language. I understand perfectly what is meant by that sentence, whether I conceptualise that understanding as "liking" or "enjoying" in my head. Secondly, English isn't a prescriptive language and the purpose of English grammar is to describe how people actually use the language. A grammar book that doesn't contain "liking" as used in this manner is, in fact, incorrect: clearly, a great many dialects find this form of the verb perfectly natural, and this usage ought to be reflected in books on English grammar.

October 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Grammar books in the UK and the US will then be wrong by your standards because "like" and other verbs of emotion, etc are not used progressively....despite some interesting dialects/versions of English that have appeared over the years in other parts of the world.

Are we supposed to change the cadence of English grammar because some regions of the world use "syllable- timed" rhythm rather than the "stress- timed" rhythm associated with British and American English?

October 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dlung1

I one time challenged (respectfully) my English teacher on the meaning of a word, based on the dictionary definition. He answered that it is not the job of the dictionary to prescribe the meaning of a word, but rather to report on the meaning of the word. I believe he would have told me the same thing concerning grammar. I once read some memos in the of the editorial staff of a major publication where they were trying to find out the proper placement of quotations in Afrikaans. They research consisted of checking all of the major Afrikaans newspapers to find out how it is done. I have been following this discussion for months, and have finally come to the conclusion that the crux of the matter is the following: Is "correct English" determined by the writers of grammar books, or by the people who speak English. I guess I will opt out of answering that question. I know Spanish has the Academia Real that makes the rules for the language. (I'm not sure how many people actually follow them.) I may seem odd, as I am a native speaker of English, but I don't know if there is some sort of governing body that is recognized as having the authority to set the rules for English. Incidentally, I am an Professor of Mathematics in an American college. (Don't mean to be bragging. It just seems to me that if there were such a body, I would have least heard about it during all those years that I spent going to college as a student.)

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/cleolin

I don't understand why "I've been liking these films" is incorrect. It sounds a little awkward, true, but "I've been enjoying these movies" sounds just as awkward.

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino

"liking" is not incorrect, it just has that perception because you usually like something or you don't. It has a binary connotation to it. "enjoying" is not awkward at all, and is the better option because it depicts continuance of something that started in the past and is still going on. That's what the Portuguese sentence is trying to convey, so that's why it's the better option. "liking" is not wrong though.

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ghostofthefuture

Despite your current negative rating, you are correct. Popularity contest notwithstanding, "enjoying" is the preferred word, probably, but grammatically, "liking" is not incorrect.

I have reported it.

"These are the facts, and they cannot be disputed."

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Cleolin:

Like is a stative verb reflecting a "state of being" and not an activity. It isn't used in the progressive form. We have *enjoy to express "I've been enjoying these films." It is standard English as is tested in SATs and TOEFL for non-native speakers who want admissions to US universities.

March 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mark.bro

But we are not studying for TOEFL. We are trying to learn Portuguese! This habit of people on here wanting to change words to suit a perfect English translation is annoying. I need to think like a Brazilian to structure a sentence in (BR) Portuguese and 'liking' does this in this instance.

May 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail

(In reply to a comment underneath) Perhaps, the use of "to like" in a progressive tense changes its meaning as well. A dictionary defines it as "enjoy" by the way.
A user asks how to say this, then:
For here you are, standing there, loving me.
And the slogan "I'm loving it", what does it mean? I'm enjoying it?

April 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Joseph2

So are you claiming that something along the lines of "I've been being silly lately" is also wrong? I don't see how "to like" is any more/less of an action verb than "to enjoy" is. But "to be" is literally THE "state of being" verb, and there's nothing objectionable about "is/am/was/were being." So why should "to like" be any different?

And to the person above who said "have been liking" wouldn't be used in the Northeastern US: I've spent my entire life in New England and the NYC metro area and everyone here uses it too. It's not just a "Southern" thing.

"My kids have been liking this month's new movies in Netflix's 'Children' section."

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/eusoumeurei

It's nice to know that. The use of action and non-action verbs is a bit tricky for us in Brazil.

December 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino

"I have been being" is wrong, "being" denotes the present continuous. Either you have been (in the past), or you are (currently) being.

It's generally the same with "liking". Either you like it, or you don't. If you liked it in the past, and still currently like it, the word for that is "enjoy", it is the active verb to be used in place of the stative "like".

But what do I know? it's not like I'm the language police or anything so feel free to disagree/disregard etc

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dlung1

I have been following this discussion months, and have contributed a few times. I have been trying to understand why this particular discussion has generated so much emotion. I admit that I am guilty of using stative verbs in the ing form. Generally when we learn a certain construction is incorrect, most of us would just switch and say it correctly. For example, "I seen", is incorrect. One would say, "I saw", or "I have seen". For most of us, that presents no problem. With this particular construction however, I see something else at play. Those of us who commit the "sin" of saying, "I am loving it", or something similar, are actually implying a different shade of meaning than when we say, "I love it". For instance, I saw "The Sound of Music" with my wife in December, and remember one of the songs saying "For here your are, standing there, loving me." I can't think of a way to say that without violating the rule. (I'm not saying it's right or wrong, only that we see, or rather hear, a slightly different meaning.) Therefore, when we are told we can't say it that way, the alternative that is given us doesn't mean to us, exactly the same thing. Therefore, we rebel. In the case of "I seen" versus "I saw", since "I saw" expresses correctly the same thing that we would have meant by saying incorrectly "I seen", we see no need to flout the rule. In the latter case, we find it irritating when someone tells us we can't say exactly what we are trying to say. I guess it runs contrary to the highly valued freedom of speech that is a given now days in most parts of the world.

Once again, this is not a commentary on the right or wrong of it, (I've accepted that it is a violation of the rules of standard English), only an analysis of why this particular issue has generated so much emotion. By the way, my thanks to those of you who have increased my understanding of my own language (English).

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamesalex1

Should "I have liked those films" really be accepted?

April 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/yokasrubio503

That they mark it wrong for "liking" is ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤. I say that all the time. I've been liking all the books I've been reading. #$@%!

October 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveSauls

why is "I have been liking those films" not correct? It's one of the prompts. Is it a particular usage of gostado?

January 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rmacheshire

My translation "I enjoyed those films. " was rejected, but it sounds better than Duolingo´s version "I've enjoyed these films.", and means the same, in my opinion. What do others think?

August 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

this sentence is awkward in Portuguese but it shows an action that started in the past and continues up to now, so I think Duo's option is fine.

August 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfSagen

I think the main problem is that Duo is quite often accepting the perfect past as a translation of PT perfect present. Really, your suggestion is indeed good, but still isn't quite translating the present perfect. ("I've really been enjoying those films lately," would be a gramatically more correct translation, and the directly translated version of your sentence would be "Eu gostei aqueles filmes" in PT.)

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jerry_bell

what on earth is a "stative verb?" "Like" can also be active, and I agree with pnhels

July 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

The answer to your question is that "stative verbs" are verbs that describe "states of being", not activities. Since they don't describe activities (as dynamic verbs do), they aren't used progressively.*

"Like" is a stative verb as are other verbs that describe emotional/mental states, states of possession, ownership, perceptions, etc.

Ex: "I own a Honda." (own = stative verb) NOT: "I am owning a Honda." /// "He seems like a nice guy." NOT: "He is seeming like a nice guy."

*A few stative verbs are used progressively with a complete change of meaning. Any site describing statives should include them.

February 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino

One simple internet search threw this up: https://goo.gl/nJyszz. See also this: http://goo.gl/tB46aO

July 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dlung1

I read the long list of words for which we are not allowed to use the progressives tense. I understand the grammar rules. However, I can guarantee you that at least 90 percent of americans would use many of those words in the progressive tenses. Probably, in a few years, it will no longer be considered incorrect. PS. I am really liking this discussion now. You could probably say I am loving it.

July 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Want to back that statistic up with ....facts? I don't know anyone who says "I'm liking...." but then again, I personally don't know anyone who says "you all" to denote the plural "you." Perhaps it's regional....Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama?

July 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/dlung1

I guess that would be hard to do. My comment was not referring specifically to liking. There were a lot of words on that list of stative verbs that I do hear used in the progressive tense regularly. I had never paid much attention to it before, because I didnt know it was verboden. (Living in Texas, I do hear y'all all the time, also.) I have lived in the East, the West and the South, but have spent the last 30 years in the south, so my memory could be playing tricks on me. But I don't think my English speach patterns have changed all that much since I was a child.

July 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Hi dlung1: Your last post sent me to the Bible for many ESL teachers: Michael Swan's Practical English Usage (UOxfordPress) in which he discusses the stative verb "need". While he points out that we would not say: "I rang her up because I was needing to talk." or "I am needing a vacation." [my example], there are some occasions that some stative verbs can be used in order to emphasize the idea of change or development.

Perhaps your example "Until the twelfth of never..." fits Swan's example. How English verbs are used in terms of "tense and aspect" is really quite complicated and receives a lot of attention from linguists. As English speakers we instinctively use verbs in subtle ways that go beyond any descriptive English Usage book, even Swan's 650-page tome. We are fortunate that English grammar is not particularly demanding for native English speakers.

December 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/frost0fractal

The purpose of language is communication, which has been evolving since it first began. A great many people use grammar improperly, but it's not a big deal if it doesn't affect the comprehension or meaning. I used to be a stickler for everything being proper, but not anymore. Having a strong vocabulary is useful to be able to express things differently or contextually. I like it, I love it, I adore it, I cherish it, etc. New words are regularly being added to dictionaries, and language continues to evolve. It's good to know what is proper, but with things that are commonly used it's also good to know what everyone else is doing. Not everyone wants to walk around sounding like Shakespeare. They just want to be able to communicate. It is also true that spoken language is much more relaxed than written language. Traditionally I would expect people to write properly, but I have far less expectations for spoken language.

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino

I completely agree with you. The problem is that people write the way they speak, and if they already speak improperly and break all sorts of grammar rules, this reflects in their written language.

And then they come to a very rigid and rules based program like Duolingo and complain that "Oh but that's not how I say it" or "lots of people say it that way", without realising that the way they or anybody else says it is not necessarily correct.

I'm not so much a stickler for everything being proper, but I am a stickler for being aware that a)there are rules which we may (and do constantly) ignore or corrupt and, more importantly, b)Duo is following these rules.

December 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Oceanotti

I've been liking Duolingo for a long time now. After this debate, I don't know if I like it or not, buy I definitively have enjoyed this conversation about English grammar in a Portuguese course. Anyway, I'm only a non-native English speaker who knows nothing about stative and dynamic verbs.

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PHScanes

Correct pronunciation of "desses": http://pt.forvo.com/word/desses/

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/orfeonegro

Oh, come on! "liking" is OK, please accept as an option!

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

When McDonalds Corp. publishes its first English grammar book, then DL may accept it. ;)

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie.Lkl

Rsrsrs. Amei!

May 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

Fantastic!! =)

August 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chribing

As native English speaker, I do think that enjoyed and liked are very similar and practically interchangeable.

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesmorino

Very similar, yes. Interchangeable? Ehh, I'd say it was context dependent. You like a person, for example, you don't enjoy a person. "Enjoy" is more appropriate for things you actively or continuously derive pleasure from. For example, I might like Lasagne, but not currently enjoy the plate of lasagne currently in front of me. I might like a person, but if they're currently being annoying I wouldn't say I was enjoying their company. I'd use "like" for a fixed state- You either like reading-, and "enjoy" for a continuous (past or present) state- You might like reading but you may not be enjoying the book you're currently reading

July 17, 2015
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