"Tú sabes de quién es el niño."

Translation:You know whose child it is.

5 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

I didn't get this the first time, so maybe this explanation will help others with the same confusion:

Consider how we write possessives in Spanish--by adding "de" before the noun. For instance, "Ann's cat" becomes "el gato de Ann" ("the cat of Ann"). In the same way, "de quién" ("of/from whom") may translate as the possessive form of "who," which is "whose." (Do not confuse this with the contraction "who's"--"who is"--which sounds the same!)

Therefore, this sentence doesn't refer to the boy's identity; it refers to whom the boy belongs. Thus, we might write "You know whose is the child" or "You know whose child he/this is."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inkymeows
inkymeows
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Thank you for explaining!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steradian

Now I can watch Maury in Spanish. Thank you Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rey_Alejandro

Genius.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halsum
halsum
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I wrote "You know whose child this is," and got it wrong. Any ideas why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nforddling

Me too. I think that we just have to accept that Duolingo is not going to take every conceivable correct answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cbusalex

"This child" would be este niño, not el niño. They have slightly different meanings. You wouldn't generally say "this child" unless the kid was actually there with you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Correct. It should be 'You know whose child IT is'. (not THIS)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arizonamae

I did the same thing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nomism
nomism
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Why not "you know who the boy belongs to"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isemilla

english speakers! why is it wrong (the word order at the end of the sentence) :you know whose child is it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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Hi Isemilla, in English, word order is a lot more rigid than in Spanish. In English declarative sentences the noun ("it") usually comes before the verb ("is"). In a question, the order is reversed. For a question you'd say "is it ...?" But in a statement you'd say "it is ...".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Well said. To add a bit of extra clarification, when this statement (is it / it is) appears in a dependent clause within a question, only the main, independent clause swaps the subject and verb; the dependent clause will use the statement form and not the question form. E.g.:

In an independent clause: "Whose child is it?" "Is it a child?" In a dependent clause: "Do you know whose child it is?" "Have you seen that it is a child?" As a statement: "You know whose child it is." "It is a child."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbelgard

"You know who the child is for" is no good?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregZdep
GregZdep
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you know WHO the boy is .....was wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpencerBlackwood

I know! I wrote that too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobbyprickalee

You know whose the child's? is this correct english?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Sorry, no; that would not make sense in English. It almost sounds like you're trying to write "You know who's the child" or "You know who's the child's mom," which would be grammatical, but neither would match the meaning of the Spanish sentence here. "You know whose IS the child" or "...whose the child IS" would be correct, however.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobbyprickalee

Sorry, ment to say un corazon.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jmcaok
Jmcaok
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Really? "You know to whom the child belongs" is wrong??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

That means something similar, but it's not the most literal translation; the word "belongs" isn't in the Spanish sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allenbandow

I got knocked for using "who" over "whose"? I thought this was teaching me Spanish, not English grammar haha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redeye011

The problem with the DL translation of this sentence is that a literal translation from Spanish to English doesn't work here. "You know of whom is this child" is literal; 'you know whose child this is' is a better English translation, in my opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nini-Rose

I put 'you know whose child that is' and it corrected me to 'you know whose boy it is' ? What did I do wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"That" or "this" do sound (to me) like more natural pronouns to use in English, but the Spanish sentence doesn't include them--it leaves off the pronoun entirely. We might write more literally "You know whose the child is," or fill in the absent "it," as in the corrected sentence, even though "it" refers to a person who would normally be "he or she."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nini-Rose

That actually really helps. Thank you, it was confusing me, guess I need to pay more attention. Thank you again.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sciamanno

Do you know whose the boy is? i am not a native English, so i wonder why it is not accepted as translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roxanne.ro1

This doesn't make sense to me when it translates to English because I want to make it a question, the way it's worded... I'm trying to think of an instance when I would use this as a statement and not a question...Am I crazy?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steradian

"Whose child is it?" "You know whose child it is."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roxanne.ro1

Ok, that makes sense. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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Did anyone try "you know whose is the child"? I know that is rather awkward english but wonder if it might be correct anyway.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larry_Porter
Larry_PorterPlus
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Nothing wrong with my translation: "You know whose son he is."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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son is hijo - -

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cis1
Cis1
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You know of whom the boy is???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ronaldpapi12

i think this sentence should not be used to teach kids to learn spanish like why would they ask "You know whose is the child"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AprilRockh

I typed the same thing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damalojo

I also put "you know whose child is the boy." Is that wrong? I know it sounds a little clunky in English,

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blakcirclegirl

To me I feel like this should be in the form of a question and that's why it's confusing.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DerekWestwood

Why not Do you know whose child it is

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
DABurnside
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The only difference as far as I can tell is the punctuation. It is posed as a statement, not a question. I'd be interested to know if the difference is nothing more than voice inflection and punctuation.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Equestrianism

In English we do not refer to children as "it"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tellislv

Child or son?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaVille249771

We do not refer to a child as "it"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lexi901620

"Hello my name is child of the one true King" -Matthew West

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kenny977777

Spanish Maury Povich show!

4 months ago
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