"I am not well, I am poorly."

Translation:Níl mé go maith, táim go dona.

February 16, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyAnn11

Poorly is used by some segments of the population in the US.It was more usually used in the South to mean feeling poorly .It generally isn't taught as proper useage in schools and is dying out. More prevalent in the 1800 to middle 1900.

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellie-bell

Why is táim tinn not acceptable for I am poorly. I thought to be poorly meant you were sick

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Not necessarily. You can be doing bad but not be sick. Say you just had a bad/tiring day, for example?

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luscinda

No, you can do poorly in/at something or you can do it poorly, both meaning badly (adv.), but if you ARE poorly (adj), that means you are unwell.

February 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brighid

I agree with Luscinda.

November 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellie-bell

But this was for translating poorly from english to irish and i thought the meaning of poorly is to be ill.

February 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardMik2

Is it commom to use both forms like that? To use Níl mé followed by Táim in the same sentence? Or did they just do that as a way of showing both?

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Generally, no. Táim is mostly dialectal, and, in that dialect, you'd use Nílim.

March 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ciarog1

is that because the verb is takes an adjective, not an adverb?

January 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ciarog1

Is ta me incorrect?

January 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lea.kharsh

By the way, English speakers don't say "I'm poorly. "

February 24, 2019
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