"Kommer du hen til mig?"

Translation:Are you coming over to me?

February 18, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RylieMcdon

I am assuming this can be read as ''Are you coming over? (to me)". As in visiting someone's house, etc.

February 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lambda314

Tried that, didn't accept it without to me

March 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcknightlr

Is this "hen" similar to the German "hin", and so means (roughly) "from there, to here"?

March 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mipani

In German, "hin" means "from here to there", as in "Geh hin zu ihm" (Go to him), while "her" means "from there to here". The Danish sentence above might be translated to: "Kommst du her zu mir?". That's at least my way to memorize "hen til".

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChelseaBar8

In the US, it is assumed it means 'to me.' Are you coming over (to me)? Are you coming over to Sarah's house (I am at Sarah's house as well)? Otherwise, we would say 'going.'

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

If I were to travel to the USA from Europe, would you in the USA say, "Are you coming over to the USA?", or would you say "Are you going over to the USA?" ? I would prefer the former.

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrchidBlack

If I am in the US and asking if you're travelling here, I'd ask if you're coming to the US. If I were in Europe (or anywhere else), I'd ask if you were going to the US. It's the same as the previous example: if I'm already at Sarah's house, I'd ask if you were coming also. If not, I'd ask if you were going there.

January 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

Thanks for your comment OrchidBlack; and I totally agree, as I stated in my previous comment to ChelseaBar8. I was merely asking her what SHE would say after her statement: "Otherwise, we would say going". :-)

January 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrchidBlack

Ah. Understood. :)

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickDaSilva

The answer in English sounds weird. A Danish-English speaker should come and tell us what sounds better.

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lambda314

I agree, I think in English the phrase 'are you coming over' implies the 'to me' part. Maybe it's the same in Danish, like you said, we'll need a speaker of both to confirm

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jnwulff

"Kommer du hen" is not used in danish. "Til mig " is needed.

June 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanna996616

Nemlig

March 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

To lambda314: That's correct. "Are you coming over", is a very common sentence, but it doesn't only imply "to me". Depending on the context it could also imply "here" or "to Ireland" for example, if that's where I'm standing.

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lambda314

Yeah, the phrase requires context really

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winterpants

Hen vs. henne is a complete nightmare...don't think I'll ever master that one : (

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanGranquist

I got corrected with are you coming over to me: You used the wrong word. Do you go over to me? I don't see how, "Kommer du hen til mig?" can be "Do you go over to me."

February 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

Hej Susan. In English, we would never say "do you go over to me", but rather, "are you coming (over) to me". If somebody is moving towards you, they are coming. If they are moving away from you, then they are going.

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/coming

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/going?s=t

February 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ciaura

In Danish, does it literally only mean "coming over to me" as in wherever I am, or can it be used to mean "coming over mine" as in my house?

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jakub1001

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

May 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tchoo_svane

I understood "Kommer du hente mig". Would that be a correct danish sentence too (and would you pronounce it like this audio) or is "kommer du hente mig" a random constellation of words?

October 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

No. "Hente" means "to fetch", "get", "pick up". I can see though, in fast speech, "hen til mig" could sound like "hente mig".

October 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tchoo_svane

I know that "hente" means to fetch, so could you say "kommer du hente mig" for "are you coming to pick me up" or would that be incorrect in danish?

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epac-mcl

Sorry, I misunderstood. You are not very wrong. You just need: "Kommer du OG hente mig".

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tchoo_svane

Okay, thank you very much :)

November 4, 2018
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