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"Ils ont porté leurs chapeaux."

Translation:They wore their hats.

5 years ago

65 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/srclarke

How can you distinguish between they were carrying their hats and they were wearing their hats?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Only that when "porter" is used in the context of clothing, it is interpreted as meaning "to wear".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ROSIEenFEU

So if the verb 'porter' is used with clothing, it ALWAYS means 'to wear'. If this is so, how does one say 'to carry' when it comes to clothing?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Porter in the context of clothing will be understood that way. But it wouldn't be the first time that one francophone looked puzzled and asked for clarification. "Tenir" is also used in this sense, i.e., Ils ont tenu leurs chapeaux = they carried their hats. One may use "transporter"; sometimes "avoir" is translated as "carry".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
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Yes, for example, how would you say in French, "They carried their hats because they did not like wearing them"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krista189497

Thank you Krista

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamExtre

"Ils ont porté leur chapeau" is OK because each has one hat.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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The "leur chapeau" form is understood as "each one has one" without using "chacun".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Thanks you much.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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You are changing the original sentence's meaning. Each one is chacun. Ils ont porté chacun leur chapeau. How do you know how many hats they have?

http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/chacun/14282 http://dictionnaire.reverso.net/francais-anglais/porter

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeiDeTaiwan

But, doesn't French use singular to mean everyone has one?

In another example, Ils tombent de leurs lits. (They fall from their beds) One Native speaker says it is weird to his ear because if we use plural forms, it seems like everyone has more than one bed.

So if this is the same logic, Ils ont porté leurs chapeaux means everyone put on more than one hat.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Maybe it means that whoever had a hat wore it, rather than they all had hats and each one wore their own individual hat. I dunno.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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After much confusion I have had a few French people confirm that the French and English use the same rules here. "Ils ont porté leurs chapeaux".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Apparently it is strictly correct (prescriptive) to use the singular, but most French people (descriptive) use the plural.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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When transcribing this sentence from audio, doesn't it sound indistinguishable from "...leur chapeau"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ywchiu
ywchiu
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"Ils sont porté" and "Ils ont porté" have the same pronunciations, don't they?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrquanta
mrquanta
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no.

ils sont = ilsont

ils ont = ilZont

with a "z" sound.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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And what would "ils sont porté" mean? It does not seem to be correct French.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shadybee1989

how to say they put(past tense) on their hats ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Mettre is used for "put on" clothing. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/mettre In that context, it can mean wear, e.g., "What shall I wear today?" But you're not wearing it yet, you are about to put it on. After you have put it on (mettre), now you are wearing it (porter). If you are wearing it, you are not carrying it, taking it, bearing it, or bringing it. There are other verbs more suitable.

For putting on clothing, mettre is not reflexive. It would be reflexive if you were putting something on yourself, e.g., "Elle se met de la crème anti-rides" = She puts on anti-wrinkle cream.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sherm456

Ils ont mis leurs chapeaux?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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That means "they put on their hats". And yes, that is past tense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eekla

Why could you say "they had worn their hats" and not "they were wearing their hats"?

Could "Ils ont porté leurs chapeaux" also be said as "Ils sont porté leurs chapeaux"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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First, "they had worn..." is the pluperfect tense: Ils avaient porté leurs chapeaux (or) leur chapeau. "They were wearing their hats" is imperfect tense: Ils portaient leurs chapeaux. The verb "porter" uses avoir as the auxiliary verb in compound tenses, not être. "Se porter" uses être as the auxiliary, but it does not mean "wear" (clothing). http://www.wordreference.com/fren/porter

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johneadviolonc
johneadviolonc
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I assume I'll learn more about the pluperfect later on. For this sentence I translated it as "They have worn their hats" and was marked correct. It occurs to me however that in English when we say "They have worn..." we are often commenting on something that is still taking place, like if I see two women coming into work with hats on I might comment, "You have worn your hats today." "They wore their hats" means they were wearing the hats in the past at some point. Is there a way to differentiate between these two phrases in French? Or is this ambiguous?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The expression, "you have worn your hats today" is ambiguous in English but "vous avez porté vos chapeaux aujourd'hui" is not. The English could be taken to mean that you wore them (earlier) today, or in the sense of "(I see) you are wearing your hats today" (right now). The French is not taken that way. It means that the action was completed in the past and is not occurring now. The French compound past always refers to actions that have been completed in the past. Examples:

  • Ils ont déjà mangé = They have already eaten
  • Nous avons visité Paris plusieurs fois = We have visited Paris several times
  • Quand je suis arrivé, j'ai vu les fleurs = When I arrived, I saw the flowers

There are three English equivalents of the French compound past. For example, «j'ai dansé» can mean:

  • I danced (simple past)
  • I have danced (present perfect)
  • I did dance (past emphatic)

All of these refer to actions which were completed in the past. Source: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/passecompose.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Should the English past emphatic always be accepted as a translation of the French passé composé?

I ask because it is how I learnt to translate it in school, yet here on Duolingo I have found that it is accepted some times, and not others. I have reported some of these instances, but not all of them.

In this very sentence in fact, I translated it into English using the past emphatic as "they did wear their hats" and it was not accepted. Should it have been accepted?

Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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It is grammatically correct but idiomatically it is not the best. It is more natural to say "they wore their hats". The emphatic forms are most useful in English when phrasing questions, e.g., est-ce qu'ils ont porté leurs chapeaux ? = Did they wear their hats? (or consider this) Est-ce qu'ils portaient leurs chapeaux ? = Were they wearing their hats?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teo334689
Teo334689
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Why not "they have brought their hats"? Isn't "porter" also "to carry/bring"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Context. When referring to an item of clothing, "porter" would be interpreted as "to wear". For an object or a person (e.g., a child), you would say "carry".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagdalenaGolden
MagdalenaGolden
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In that case, how would you say "they have brought their hats" in French? Meaning that they just brought them somewhere (e.g. to the theatre to be used in the performance) rather than wore them?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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To distinguish that, use apporter. Elles ont apporté leurs chapeaux. If you are talking about "brought them (to somebody)", you could use "amené".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagdalenaGolden
MagdalenaGolden
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Thank you, that makes it clear now! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no1uno

What about they took their hats? Isn't that also a legit translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poisonsilvy

They put on their hats. Ils ont mis leurs chapeaux (it is not reflexive)

They took their hats. Ils ont pris leurs chapeaux ( the meaning is different)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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In the context of clothing, "porter" means "to wear", "mettre" means "to put on".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KovacsGy

How about "they were wearing their hats", or would it be something else than passé composé in translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrquanta
mrquanta
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yes, the tense then would be "imparfait".

"ils portaient leurs chapeaux"

this tense gives the feeling that the action in question is "repeated in time" or "an incompleted action".

so when you want to say that "they used to wear their hats" or "they were wearing their hats when we heard the explosion", you can use imparfait.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmadGhaem

I don't understand how this can be in passé composé. How could this sentence mean anything different from "They were wearing their hats"? I can't see how the action of wearing a hat can act as a foreground in a story, or even in what way the french sentence could be used at all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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The passé composé is formed from the present tense of « avoir » (the auxiliary) plus the participe passé of the main verb, in this case « porter » -> « porté ».

They went skiing. It was very cold. They wore their hats. The hats kept their heads warm.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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The difference is that Passé composé refers to completed actions and imperfect refers to past actions without any regard to whether they were completed or not. I.e.,

  • Ils ont porté leur chapeau = They wore their hats (yes, it can be "their hats")
  • Ils portaient leur chapeau = They were wearing their hats.

Here is the best explanation of this difference I have found: https://languagecenter.cla.umn.edu/lc/FrenchSite1022/FirstVERBS.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BruceGauth
BruceGauth
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Could the meaning of this sentence also mean: "They took responsibility"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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I can't imagine. Where did you find that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BruceGauth
BruceGauth
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« porter le chapeau » est devenu synonyme d’« être responsable ». On retrouve la même association d’idées dans l’expression « porter la culotte ». from Wiktionnaire

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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Okay, that's really interesting. "Porter le chapeau" = to take the blame. "Faire porter le chapeau à qqn = to put the blame on somebody. It's a fixed expression. http://www.wordreference.com/fren/porter%20le%20chapeau "Porter la culotte" = "to wear the pants" (in the family) is a familiar expression in the U.S. referring to the person who is the "head of the house" or the person who makes the decisions. A lingot for sharing a new expression.

However, I'm pretty sure that expression doesn't cover "porter leurs chapeaux".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inguin-freyr
Inguin-freyr
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they had worn their hats is considered wrong. Anyone have any idea why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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Because "ont" is in the present tense, while "had" is past tense. "Ont porté" could be translated "wore" or "have worn," but "had worn" would be "avaient porté."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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"They had worn" is pluperfect (ils avaient porté). "They have worn" (or) "they wore" is Passé composé (ils ont porté). The pluperfect tense is only used to refer to a previous past action which occurred before another action in the past.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abheek1211

Why not "They had put on their hats" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"To put on" is « mettre » (single action). "To wear" is « porter » (continuous action).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasGabr13

Why not portés so that it agrees with ils?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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When the auxiliary is « avoir » it only agrees with the direct object when it comes before the auxiliary. When the auxiliary is « être » it agrees with the subject.

  • L'homme ? Il l'a vu. - The man? He saw him. (« avoir » - « il a », direct object « le »)
  • Il est fatigué. - He is tired. (« être » - « il est », subject « il »)
  • La femme ? Il l'a vue. - The woman? He saw her. (« avoir » - « il a », direct object « la »)
  • Elle est fatiguée. - She is tired. (« être » - « elle est », subject « elle »)
  • Les hommes ? Il les a vus. - The men? He saw them. (« avoir » - « il a », direct object « les »)
  • Ils sont fatigués. - They are tired. (« être » - « ils sont », subject « ils »)
  • Les femmes ? Il les a vues. - The women? He saw them. (« avoir » - « il a », direct object « les »)
  • Elles sont fatiguées. - They are tired. (« être » - « elles sont », subject « elles »)
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harri725785

Why not "They had worn their hats"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"They have worn their hats" is a valid translation. However, "They had worn their hats" is incorrect.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ODDBJERKE
ODDBJERKE
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In plural when do you put a "s" after the verb and when not?? For instance, why not "ils ont portés"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nectarivorous

The rules for this are explained in detail in the tips given on the opening screen for this lesson. If you cannot view them, this will help:

https://www.laits.utexas.edu/tex/pr/tap3.html

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan554280

Shouldn't it be portés?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S.Ghosh3

I wrote, "They put on their hats". DL marked it wrong n gave as correct "They had put on their hats". Was I really incorrect?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria.Learning

"Ils ont porté leur chapeau" was not ok the first time .Now "Ils ont porté leur chapeaux" is also wrong. Which one is wright??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Debbie192406

I was penalised for using the plural last time now I'm penalised for using the singular (of chapeau). Help?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarinaHern7

Please: a what time is "their" instead "theirs". Tnk U marina

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CSA_GW
CSA_GW
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I have a question regarding "leur chapeau' and "leurs chapeaux".

In this case, each should have one hat for his/her self. What will the French expression be if the item is sharable? The song below is the example popping up in my mind while I saw this exercise:

There were ten in a bed/ And the little one said/ "Roll over, roll over"/ So they all rolled over/ And one fell out

.....

Here, ALL the little ones are sharing one bed. How do we differ the expressions for one-per-all and for one-per-each?

help please

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FarLander471

Why is "they were carrying their hats" wrong?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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"They were wearing their hats," not acceptable? Oh dear! I thought I was getting it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Apsa25
Apsa25
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"They were wearing their hats" - what is wrong with it?

1 month ago