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  5. "Jag vill ha mer sås!"

"Jag vill ha mer sås!"

Translation:I want more sauce!

February 18, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tpx90

In case anyone else was wondering about the difference between 'mer' and 'fler', I just looked it up.

'Mer' is used for more of an uncountable thing. Like sauce or sugar. Its the opposite of the English word 'less'.

'Fler' is used for more of a countable thing. Like biscuits or plates. It's the opposite of the English word 'fewer'.

For some reason or other, English has combined these two meanings into the single word 'more', even though it's kept the distinction with the opposite meaning with the words, 'less' and 'fewer'.

http://www.thelocal.se/blogs/theswedishteacher/2011/01/24/mer-mera-fler-or-flera/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taurendil

As flera means several, the word cannot be used with anything that is uncountable like water. Okay, so fler is then like "several more" or "more to the several". It can be several cups of water but in one cup there is much (not many!) of water. Thanks for this little info. Tack så mycket!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

Interestingly, the use of mer bleeds over into the realm of countables sometimes, but the opposite is not true. You might well hear "mer kakor" or "mer bilar".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taurendil

Oh, so is it a correct way of saying things? As with these examples, is that only in spoken svenska or also in written language?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

I'm not sure as to the correctness of it, but it does happen quite often at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradleyHar147441

I speak english and I don't use fewer; I always say less


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

Would you say there were less people at an event, or that you need less books, rather than fewer? This is becoming more common, but is technically not correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradleyHar147441

Yes, but I would say that there weren't as many people at an event


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaBrown8

Is it usual to say 'I want' (demand) rather than 'I would like' (request) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurCal

This was the wrong time for this lesson... now I want those Ikea meatballs with lindonberry sauce but they don't have IKEA here I'd have to take a 50$ ferry ride to get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vithralas

Here you have a lingot to help you paying your ferry ride, hahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

Duo should accept "I would like." Now it's inconsistent--sometimes accepted and sometimes marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

We make a distinction between would like - skulle vilja / want - vill, not because they differ that much but because we find that it's hard to teach both constructions in Swedish otherwise. This is not always perfect and we're discussing whether to keep the distinction in the next tree version or not.

Unfortunately, not all sentences reflect this, and there are such a large number of them that it's hard to track all inconsistencies down. We are, however, getting there - slowly but surely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

Okay, this would be why "I would like...." worked on the previous sentence but was marked wrong on this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Hard to say without knowing which sentence that was - would you happen to remember, so I can check?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

Sorry, I kind of forget them as soon as they've gone by! But I know it worked on one, and then not on the next. Maybe the exclamation point makes this sentence more "demanding"...."I would like" is a more polite phrasing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Well, if you encounter it again, please feel free to ask again. I'd be happy to look at it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vithralas

This was a "Translate into English", so it was fine, but now I wonder about the difference between "mer" and "till". Is "till" used for countable things as well? Like "en köttbulle till" or is it due to another reason?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

I'd put this in the "it's just the way they say it" category. It's used kind of like an intensifier in this context....instead of "Jag vill ha mer sås", you could say "Jag vill ha lite sås till"...a little more sauce. But in other contexts, "till" does NOT mean "more"....it can mean "until", or "towards", or "to", for example. Prepositions are slippery things!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunducs

Is this an accepted way of asking or would I be considered rude?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That depends entirely on when and how it is said. If you just blurt it out as an order, you'll sound like a spoiled child. If someone asks what you'd like, it's a perfectly reasonable response.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kunducs

Thanks that make sense, so it's pretty much how it is in English. I'm always cautious, because in my native language there's no place for "want" in a request.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stefanosometimes

Is the sentence "jag vill ha..." a little unpolite? How would you say "I would like more sauce / I'd want more sauce" instead of "I want more sauce"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

For instance:

  • Jag skulle vilja ha lite mer sås
  • Kan jag få lite mer sås?
  • Skulle jag kunna få lite mer sås?

But the sentence isn't necessarily rude. Please see my other comments in this thread.

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