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"Yo me motivo"

Translation:I motivate myself

5 years ago

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cal7
cal7
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what is the infinitive? motivar?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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well in here it would be motivarse, to motivate oneself.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Duolingo is not consistent with refelexive pronouns. I have lost hearts for including them; I have lost points for not including them. I think I am motivated should be accepted...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ratakoolta
ratakoolta
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There is a slight difference between me motivo and estoy motivado. "Me motivo" is the process to be motivated, like I'm motivating myself. "Estoy motivado" is the result of such process

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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I don't think we have that difference in English though, both of those sentiments we would just express as "I am motivated."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

Listen: Do you like to do work out? -no but I motivate myself to do it

Does it motivate you? -no, I motivate myself

How is your student doing? -well, he needs practice but he's motivated! (I wouldn't say, in this case, that he motivates himself unless someone asked how he did it which is the mechanism)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TezraM

Estoy motivado.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellenem

I agree. It may not be literal but is the way we would express it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Exactamente.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElaineWino

I agree

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melyndi
Melyndi
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I am motivated is just a passive. That could mean you motivated your self or that some one else motivated you. It's not the same thing

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Yep

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

I put 'I am motivated,' thinking that the passive reflexive would be a correct interpretation here. Does anybody know if that works or not?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

I could be all wrong, but if "Se habla espanol" can be translated as "Spanish is spoken" rather than "Spanish speaks itself", then it seems to me that "Yo me motivo" can be "I am motivated," which would seem more natural than "I motivate myself."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Actually "se habla español" is the incomplete passive voice in which the "se" can be translated to "one/you/they" depending on context. For example "se habla español en Mexico" means either "Spanish is spoken in Mexico" or "They speak Spanish in Mexico". The incomplete passive is used with the 3rd person conjugayion of a verb and is ALWAYS pairs with "se". So "I am motivated" would be "Se me motiva"-"they motivate me/I am motivated (by someone, we don't know who)". Yo me motivo should be translated as "I motivate myself", since that IS reflexive. But of course as you said "I motivate myself" sounds weird, so I guess it's possible to say "I am motivated" to sound more natural in English, but "I am motivated" is actually "Soy/Estoy motivado", depending on what you mean.

Here's a link about the passive: http://spanish.about.com/cs/verbs/a/passive_se.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

"I am self-motivated" -- much more natural than "I motivate myself" -- embarrassed that I didn't think of it sooner.

Thanks, neiht20. But is "Se me motiva" actually a good sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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I think it can be, but it wouldn't be commonly used... If you're talking about yourself having the characteristic of being motivated, then you would use "Soy motivado". The incomplete passive is used when the agent is unknown. So "I am motivated BY my dad" includes the agent, the person who is motivating them is their dad, this would use the complete passive "Soy motivado/motivada (if you're a girl) POR mi papá". But if you don't know the agent (the person attached to the "by"/"por") them you use the incomplete passive to say "se me motiva", which means "I am motivated", but only if you mean that you are motivated by someone, but you're not specifically stating who OR you don't even know who's doing it.

Here's a link about the complete passive if you want to learn more: http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/PASSIVE.HTM

The passive is kind of confusing, and it usually can be reworded into the active voice that makes much more sense. E.g. Passive: Las maletas me fueron entregadas por mi padre VS. Active: Mi padre me entregó las maletas. The luggage was delivered to me by my dad VS. My dad delivered the luggage to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

Perhaps "I get myself motivated" would be a more natural-sounding translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I am self-motived = I am motivated. The latter is more natural, in my opinion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mangledmatt

The word "motivated" is a participle and is different from "motivate" in both english and spanish. I think the only way to say the participle is to tack it on after some form of "to be". So "I am motivated" becomes "estoy motivado". This is quite different from the present reflexive form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diggabyte
Diggabyte
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I motivate myself sounds like a good translation to me, or you could say I am self-motivated, though I doubt that duolingo would accept it as it is not the literal translation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LouisaLope

'Who motivates you?'

'I motivate myself!'

Might not come up often in life but makes perfect sense in that context

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

No, well. I see where you're going with that. The "se" impassive is a little different though. The "se" part is usually used to explain the thing(s) that happened to you, that was technically probably your fault, but not completely. For example: if you lost you keys you would said "I lost my keys" but in Spanish most likely you would said "se me perdieron las llaves" which sounds both reflexive and accidental in occurrence. When I learned this, I started reading it as "the keys lost themselves on me" because you must reflect who the action is happening to, but still keep in mind that they didn't purposefully lose the keys (I'm kidnapping you) but that they've misplaced them (I can let you out when I find them)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turgidtom

i think you have to use "motivate" the verb instead of "motivated" the adjective

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

Could you elaborate what you mean? In Spanish, the reflexive is often used to form what would be a passive construction in English. See here, for example: http://spanish.about.com/cs/verbs/a/passive_se.htm I think my mistake was to apply it outside the third person. From what I'm reading, non-third person passive reflexive would be rare.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Turgidtom

hmm, it seems to me that the reason this sentence differs from those in the link is that the thing doing the verb is expressly named. sorry i can't be more helpful, i just don't know the vocabulary of language :(

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmandias

Yes, I think that's right.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mangledmatt

I don't beleive that the passive construction applies in the case you are trying to say. To say "I am motivated" you would say "estoy motivado". See the lesson on Verbs: Particples three rungs back.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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I checked three dictionaries (big ones) and I don't find motivarse as a verb. Google shows almost 500,000 hits for it, but all seem to amount to "to motivate oneself." I think "I am motivated" (which I myself tried to use) is simply wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloPaz0

self motivated means the same thing and is a more common way to say it in english

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/durasplice
durasplice
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I put, "I self motivate" (I motivate myself)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

Self-motivate needs to be hyphenated. The same with self-start if one were to use that as an alternative.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingo__777

"I motivate me" should work, I used to say it all the time in the military. .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
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You may have said it, but it's not exactly good English!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sernstberger
sernstberger
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Why wouldn't we have something reflexive here ... with se? Like ... Se motivo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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Sernstberger the "me" is reflexive - "I motivate myself". Also gernt - the first example you gave is not reflexive either in english or spanish - and I believe it should be "lo motivo" as you use a direct object pronoun for "I motivate him" . This time you are using the transitve verb "motivar"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mdcooper88
mdcooper88
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so couldn't this be "I get motivated"? Kind of like how it works for "get mad"? I put that and got it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PanchoCocinero

Me too. I think "I get motivated" is a good translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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OK. I went looking, and found this: http://www.linguee.es/espanol-ingles/traduccion/le+motiva.html . It didn't clear it up for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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Hi Gernt - I looked at the examples in your link - and have to admit the use of "le" has also confused me. The direct object pronouns for you he/she and formal (usted) should be lo/la.

One example from your link seems to confirm the direct object pronoun but in that case "motiva" is translated as "enables":

"..conforme lo motiva a tomar acción.." = "..as it enables you to take action.."

Here" lo" is clearly the Direct Object pronoun "you" (usted form)

Another example from your link :

¿Qué es lo que le motiva? What motivates you? I would literally render it as "What is that which motivates you? But "le" throws me because I expect the DO "¿Qué es lo que lo motiva? (formal) or ¿Qué es lo que te motiva? (informal)

Since le is an Indirect Object Pronoun that would imply that the verb is used like gustar - e.g "le gusta la musica" means "he/she likes the music" (or more literally "the music is pleasing to him/her)" so the literal translation for the above would be more like: "What is that which is motivating to you?" So - and I'm guessing here that - motivar is a similar verb to gustar in these cases at least - but I would appreciate if someone more expert could comment!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Aiden, motivar does not work like gustar. This (incorrect ?) use of le instead of lo is widely used in Spain, especially in the south, and is no longer considered an error, but a regional use. I suggest that as learners, we use the lo for direct objects, which is what motivar calls for. Look up "leísmo" and you will see lots of opinions on this use.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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thanks Melita again - I made the mistake of looking it up in Wikipedia and after starting innocently enough with "leismo" I got sidetracked into "loismo" and "laismo" and before I realised what was happening I was sucked in and found myself reading about declensions in various languages including Irish and Old English. I managed to escape just before being dragged under in a morass of grammatical cases and declensions in Sanskrit ! The moral of this story is when looking in Wikipedia never ever click another linked word. That way lies madness :O

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Like "Le motivo" - I motivate him or "Él se motiva" - he motivates himself?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

Él se motiva- exacto, he motivates himself. Le motivo- I motivate him (only in Spain where Lo is a male and can be switched to Le) otherwise, use Lo motivo for I motivate him :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mangledmatt

This sentence is reflexive. I think you want to do some reading on reflexives and the use of the passive se.

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/reflexive1.htm http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100024/passive-se#.U1rG9s78XbU

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The verb is reflexibve, but en inglés one does not always translate the pronoun in this type of sentence. Without context I can see little difference between I am self motivated and I am motivated. Both should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tejon
Tejon
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I am motivated is literal translation. I motivate myself is terrible English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Wouldn't "I am motivated" be "Estoy motivado"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Yea that's what I think it would be. And I motivate myself is not terrible English... It sounds perfectly fine, even if it's not something said everyday.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sue_Wright

It's not bad English but it isn't normal English and a native speaker is v unlikely to say it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Correct, Sue. I am motivated to study Spanish. I would not say, "I am self motivated to study Spanish." Or "I motivate myself to study Spanish."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mangledmatt

I motivate myself is perfectly fine. In fact I motivate myself every day to come on Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

You mean you are self-motivated to come on Duolingo? Motivating one-self is bad English!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/horriblememes

JUST DO IT!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grandmompam

I am motivated is better English. We don't usually say "I motivate myself." It sounds awkward.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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I think that "I am self-motivated" sounds better, because just saying "I am motivated" isn't specific enough (you could easily be motivated by external means). However, we're called to translate as closely to the original as we can because this is a computer program, but feel free to report it. Maybe they'll decide to change it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Catalina10912

I was unsure of this answer so i went on google translate and it says 'yo me motivo' means 'I reason' which is apparently wrong on duo..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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period is missing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ron.seymour

' I am self motivated' ought to be in the Duo database.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Azuresky333

I thought this was "Yo memotivo." Until I listened to it more clearly. :D

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melyndi
Melyndi
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I'm not sure if it's my computer acting up or the audio on Duo itself but I couldn't hear it on full speed. The audio kept cutting out... I finally played it on slow and guessed what it was.. Is anyone else having the same problem or is it just my computer acting up?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eileen635107
Eileen635107
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Can you translate it to, "I am self-motivated."?

1 week ago