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https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1

Have you ever misplaced a word?

tnel1
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I've been learning German for awhile now. I use it everyday as best I can. I really enjoy it and although I still have a long way to go with it, it has really become a part of me. I noticed one weird random thing though.

Imgur

For the life of me I can never remember the word in English anymore for scallops! The German word (Jackobsmuscheln) somehow took over the #1 spot for this word in my memory and it won't budge. I have to work really hard to pull up the English word. It's loco! :) I have to keep reminding myself "scallops, scallops, scallops!"

Has a new language bumped any of your words like this?

3 years ago

73 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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Que? Never happened to me nunca.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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:D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fazac
Fazac
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I automatically swear in German/Swiss German now :-/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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:D You must tell me on my stream what you are saying. And when could you ever have occasion to swear at/with Swiss people? (They don't even honk at you if you cut them off in traffic. They are pretty chill.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fazac
Fazac
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Haha. my husband is Swiss, so I've picked up a few choice phrases…. god knows how you write them though… I'll find out for you ;-) …. I could swear at the bureaucrats often enough!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenRawr
StephenRawr
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Similar phenomenon, but maybe not: I can't say "Bless you!" when someone sneezes (or I guess technically I can but it feels weird and wrong to me). I always say "Gesundheit!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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I grew up saying that in the US and had no real idea what it meant. It just sounded nice, and non-religious. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M4rt4a
M4rt4a
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Well, it's a ridiculous example but I can't remember the last time I used 'ouch' or 'ała' (that's the Polish one) whenever I get hurt or anything. My first reaction is always 'itai' in Japanese.

But it's pretty common for me that when people ask me something in Polish, I know perfectly well how I would answer in English but I have a hard time translating it into Polish. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Far_1
Far_1
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That's interesting, i haven't had this happen to me yet but sometimes when i see something right away the first thing that pops in my head is the spanish or portuguese word for it, instead of the english one. Seen horses on tv yesterday and automatically thought ''los caballos'' before anything. You're getting so good at german, you're forgetting english!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Ah, you remind me of another post I always meant to make! I wanted to ask people which languages they use are culturally positive about mixing multiple languages and which are not. (Maybe you could post that sometime? :)) I come from a culture that is all about that, but I think some cultures are down on that practice. I think it's fun though. And sometimes a word just feels better in your mouth. Cabellos. Horses. I'd go with cabellos too. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulaha88

I suspect it's due to a property of second language acquisition. Either one of two phenomenon. A. To speak a second language, you must mentally disable / silence your primary language. Otherwise, since you know your first language better, it would "leak out" when you get stuck in the second language. (Ever notice that when you're stuck for a word in a 2nd language, your brain grabs the corresponding word from your 3rd language, not your 1st language? That's why!) Somehow, when your brain temporarily disabled English, it permanently disabled the word "scallops."

or

B. If you use your second language all the time (e.g. a Russian who emigrates to the US), your 2nd language becomes your primary language, and as such, you are fluent in your new language but your old first language begins to decay. Do you use German more than English these days?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankenstein724
frankenstein724
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While it can definitely get to the point where you are forgetting some vocab here and there, it really takes a long time for one's native language to "decay". I lived in Argentina for two years speaking almost exclusively Spanish, and a word or two here and there is all that got effected.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Yep. I'm not worried about losing English. This is the only word I can think of this happening with so far. I find it very hard when I am trying to speak German though to pull from things I need in English. It's all good though. I still can't even believe I speak German! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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I love your scientific approach! :D That's fun! I don't know. Buying fish and meats here in German speaking world has always been tricky for me - between the metric system, Swiss francs, and other words for food my mind was bound to make a mess of things. I grocery shop every few days so I see food related words a lot. I think the fact I regularly speak with someone who is a native German speaker led me to sometimes have to use the German words since saying the words in English didn't work. English has a whole lotta words. ;) Mostly I keep things straight, but I do mix up English, Spanish, and German at times.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellerm
hellerm
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When ever I write a report if there is a long word which is shorter in French, I will start to write it in French, remember hey I'm writing an English report and erase and grudgingly write the longer, English word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I don't know if a word has ever been completely misplaced. I did, and sometimes still do, use the Russian word for something if it just seems more appropriate or I simply like it better. Especially when I was hanging out with people I'd been in Russia with, some words just worked better in Russian. I know there were some weird anglicised versions of words that I used for a long time, like klyuchis for keys (anglicised from ключи (klyuchi)), I've got out of the habit of that now though. Maybe as my Russian gets better I'll find myself doing that again.

I'm not sure I've ever entirely lost a word, most of the words I'd say in Russian it's because they work better in Russian or they're a Russian concept. Jackobsmuscheln is a very cool word, though, I'm not surprised your brain prefers it ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I just remembered one that I use to this day; I've not forgotten the English, and I'll usually say it in English if I'm actually talking to someone else, but if I go to think/say to myself that something is the most important, for some reason it always comes out самый главный. I have no idea why, no idea why it's that phrase my brain is still fixated on to this day, but that is one that really stuck. самый is a word that would also pop up if I'm attempting to write Russian, for some reason I really like it, but it's the phrase that sticks around. People around me might be more aware of me making random language mangles than me, though!

I also have this weird tendency to process things as being in Cyrillic when they're not, like the number plate of a friend's car that for years I processed as "NAS" even though it was actually HAC, because it looked like the Russian нас. I guess our brains like to make words wherever they can!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

No, but I dreamed that my cat was teaching me languages by pressing his head into my hand. I woke up and he was pressing his head into my hand. Then I started thinking of a Science Fiction story in which that would actually work, sort of the way Spock touches the face of someone with whom he wants to mind-meld.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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:D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I would absolutely read that story! Cats and languages? Yes please!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Has anybody noticed that we have managed to spin out a conversation over more than 50 comments, based on scallops, chickpeas and aubergines ...... a lot of fun but do you ever wonder if we might seem a little bit odd to anyone who didn't share our passion for words various :-))) (Mind you it would make a good basis for a very tasty meal!! )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Ya'll are awesome! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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As are you :-))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I came to this conclusion the other day; I went searching for Croatian material, which I didn't find, and found Anna Karenina in Russian, a Russian cultural terms dictionary, an Esperanto dictionary, a Hebrew textbook and my notes, and a German reader.... and then when I gave up and sat down having rummaged through my findings, I was learning words from several languages on Memrise and listening to Estonian pop music.

I sent a message to a friend saying, y'know, a lot of people think I'm a bit odd, and I think they might have a point...

I like odd people, though, so it doesn't worry me too much ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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I think odd people are the only ones I have anything in common with ...... as for your search and find mission .... you should see my book/music/video collection .... pick a language/script ... any language/script (some of which are only on my to do list) .... and what's more I can spend many a happy hour just rearranging them all ... whilst listening to the music/audio books ...... Odd ??? What a suggestion :-)))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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:D

If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.

(Henry David Thoreau)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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The universe is wider than our views of it.

(Henry David Thoreau) :-))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
Zzzzz...
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You have it backwards. We are the normal ones; everyone else is odd. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Aha! that's it, they're all out of step except for us :-))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
Zzzzz...
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I start sentences with also, no matter what language I am using at that moment. A really irritating habit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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I was just fantasizing earlier today about tossing more of those into my German Wortsalat when I speak. :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harryclark17
harryclark17Plus
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I've started using the word "vêtement" (article/piece of clothing) in English, because I just think it's so useful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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When I was studying French I used to annoy my sweetie by saying "vraiment?" instead of "really?" Well, he teased me first for saying "really?" too much so I thought I'd make it sound more sophisticated. ;) I think he secretly liked it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klinehopper

That just means you are so immersed in your language, I would imagine. That's awesome. Again as the least experienced and newbie I haven't had that happen, yet (I hope so). I have certain words I obsess on but mostly in writing now I spell some Englisch the German way and am mixing up my Eyes and EEs (I and E positions in words). Makes sense what you folks are saying. Some words do sound better or I like better in other languages as you said. When talking with someone who has a lilting English accent that I recognize as an original Farsi speaker I always want to use unfortunately in Farsi when talking with them. Even in my own speech, I just like the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

I really like aubergines and think eggplant is an ugly word that doesn't sound like something that tastes good. So I just decided to adopt the French word into English and use it from now on. I also prefer chickpeas to garbanzo beans. I'm not sure how we got two words for those things into English but it kind of sounds like the latter came from Spanish, doesn't it? So I always call them chickpeas.

One downstream affect of duolingo making millions more bilingual and trilingual people and polyglots will probably be the wholesale borrowing of a whole lot more words between languages. Already I use "hay" for there is or there are when jotting down notes, just because it's so much faster. Also "ayer" for yesterday and so on.

What words would you import into English if you could?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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There are so many words that English should adopt. Going round to visit someone's house for a cuppa and maybe a bite to eat? в гости. To be at someone's house - well, I suppose we've already adopted chez somebody to some extent - ditto voila, which is a very useful word. My brains is blank as to others at the moment, but I'll come up with more in due time...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

My adopted son speaks Russian as his first language, so we started importing Russian words into our lives. One of the cats is nicknamed Riba, which I gather means fish that he uses as an endearment for people of any species, and hotdogs are sisiski. (I'm probably not spelling these things right because I learned them by ear.) I can't wait to learn Russian so we can speak it as our private language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Yes, riba рыба is fish, and I think those hotdog/frankfurter type sausages would be сосиски: Russian о turns into a kind of schwa/a sound when it isn't stressed, and I think that's stressed on the middle syllable!

That's a great reason to learn a language, I'm sure you'll have great success with that as your motivation :D

I'm trying to think of good words for you, and my mind is a blank... :/ oh, the diminutive for Мама in Russian is really sweet: мамочка mamochka :) also I'm very fond of the word for cat now I come to think of it кошка. I hope the Russian team surprise us and the course comes out quicker than we expect. Russian is a gorgeous language <3

I've just been reminded of something one of my Russian teachers used to say: Русский язык как песня! (Russkiy yezyk kak pessnya): The Russian language is like a song! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Oh, yeah, one of the cats named Masa is now called Masenka. I love the Russian names and nicknames and endearments. I also think it's cool that water is voda and the endearment or diminutive form of that is vodka. =D

About сосиски I think you are right. My son is not very literate in Russian, since all his schooling has been in English. And his birth mom told me his spoken Russian is not that great either. So given that I'm learning words badly myself through an iffy channel, I'm not at all surprised if we're pretty far off. =D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Well you were close enough that a non-native, semi fluent speaker could figure it out - I think that ain't bad ;)

And yes, I love the diminutives, too, they're cool. I love how some names become almost unrecognisable when you make them a diminutive!

I think my favourite would be Seriozha, which comes from Sergei, iirc. My host family in Russia called me Sarochka :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvgenFirst
EvgenFirst
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Diminutive of vodka would be vo'dochka) Diminutive of voda would be vodi'chka)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvgenFirst
EvgenFirst
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Котик and котэ also) Котик - for a cute male cat and котэ - modern slang for some kind of an alpha-male cat or a cat with personality charisma)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Thanks for the information! So vodka and voda are not linked in the way I thought. That's good to know. I can't wait for Russian to hatch!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Think of all the Indian words we use without a second thought, we have bungalows, tiffin, jodphurs, chukkas, there are dozens of them, I just can't remember them all at the moment, then we've pinched the odd bit of Spanish, with our siestas and mananas (no accent on ours), Italian with Ciao, panini and cappucino, et al (Latin, obviously!! ) The list is endless, English is very much the mongrel of the language world .... if we like a word and find it useful we just add it on ! ..... I love that, don't you ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Absolutely - it's one of the strengths of the language! And gives us such a rich vocabulary <3

I am a proper British mongrel (to my knowledge, I have antecedents from Ireland, Wales, one who was Jersey French and another who was British Roma), so I kind of like that English is just as messed up as I am ;|

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
Zzzzz...
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I concur. I just used ad nauseam in a comment on another thread and did not even think about this until I read your comment. I prefer 'aubergine' by the way. :) And I have enjoyed your conversation immensely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

I love that English does that! It makes it so expressive and rich.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Oh funny! I am the opposite about aubergine. I try to never say it and insist on eggplant. I have no idea why. Aubergine is actually much more beautiful. I use garbanzo or chickpea, but my partner uses "hummus" for these words which always confuses me because I think of hummus as just being the paste, ya know? I guess we fight our little micro word wars. ;) Yes, it is exciting to think of more people knowing multiple languages and hopefully mixing them up a bit! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Yes, hummus for me is also the paste that has garlic and tahini as well as chickpeas and tastes so great on pita bread, but I actually kind of like hummus as a word better than chickpea so I may follow your partner's lead on this one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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He will be happy to know he has someone on his side on this! :D Gracias.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Now, you see, you think aubergine is a French word (which of course it is) but it is also the British English word, I had never heard of eggplants until my American neighbour moved in next door. ..... I find words and their origins endlessly fascinating, don't you?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TatianaBoshenka

Oh good! So that's several million fewer English speakers I have left to convert to using aubergine! =D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Yes, we just need to convince tnel1 of the inherent beauty of the word aubergine and we'll have one less to go ...... as a trade off, I'll happily use garbanzo for chickpea, or, humous (alternative Brit spelling, we use hummus too! ), so, is it a deal ? LOL :-))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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My partner's favorite veggie is aubergine, but I always cook eggplant for him! ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Ah well, yes, wouldn't we all LOL :-))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Me too - first time someone referred to an aubergine as an eggplant I was all... WHUT?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Yes, I have no idea where the "egg" part comes from! I gotta go sniff around that or I won't sleep tonight...;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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There is a variety of aubergine/eggplant (delete as appropriate) which is white and about the size of an egg , I wonder if that was the first one in America, or even the first one that was "domesticated" for want of a better word. Certainly, that seems to make a lot more sense than calling something large and purple an eggplant. ..... anyway, that's my theory and I'm sticking to it :-)))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Heheheh.

My best guess would be the shape? I mean, they're both kind of rounded and smaller at the top... I'm clutching at straws here.

But it takes quite some imagination to see a shiny purple thing and go, ah, yes, it looks like an egg, of course. I'm like... <_< sure it does, sure it does...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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okay, the reason for the eggplant name is kind of boring, but the reason for other names is like language porn lol

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggplant#Names_and_etymology

enjoy! ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Wow! Did that word get around or what?! Did you notice this part? "The usual word in Italian remains melanzana.[13] An alternative Italian etymology is "mela insana", insane apple."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Yes, the insane apple made me chuckle, too. UNFORTUNATE!

No wonder we Brits adopted it, I mean, a word that's gone around the block that many times is just a match made in heaven for English ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vedney
Vedney
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Whenever I want to translate something to Tagalog, theSpanish translation keeps coming up first.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Wow. You know Tagalog? I always found that so interesting sounding! :) Isn't there a bit of Spanish in it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vedney
Vedney
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Yep, there is a decent amount of Spanish loanwords on Tagalog (albeit with a different spellings). There's also little instances where the Spanish influence is really obvious. For example, if we want to say "two o'clock", we say "a las dos" despite "a las" appearing nowhere else in the language and the fact that the Tagalof word for "two" is "dalawa" instead of "dos".

Fun fact: If Spain had never colonized the Philippines, not only would we not be no longer using the Latin alphabet, we would also have been a Muslim country.

The thing that makes Tagalog the way it sounds is the sheer amount of repetition (and vowels). For example, if you want to conjugate a verb, you're going to have repeat the first syllable for all the tenses except past tense.

We also don't have a word indicating excessiveness (i.e. "every" or "very") so instead we just repeat the word to give it emphasis. To say "everyday", you would say "araw-araw" ("Araw" meaning "day".)

Another of Tagalog's quirks is the fact that whenever the letters "n" and "g" are beside each other, they are ALWAYS pronounced together. For example, "hangin" (air or wind) is pronounced "hang-in" instead of "han-gin".

Fun fact: Tagalog doesn't have the letter "C"

I'm surprised it hasn't entered the Incubator along with all these new courses because it's such an simple language. It doesn't have any noun cases or plurals. Not even its pronouns denote gender. Just adding "ba" in a sentence automatically turns it into a question.

If it does ever enter the Incubator, it may start out with the reverse course first. Virtually all, English-speaking Filipinos in the Philippines know Tagalog, butthe same cannot be said for the inverse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Wow!!! That was so interesting! I love your fun facts! Maybe you could make some posts about Tagalog that everyone could see? :) Thanks for taking the time to teach me all that! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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"Maybe you could make some posts about Tagalog that everyone could see?"

Ooooh, doooo iiiitttt :D that would be cool!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vedney
Vedney
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You mean like a Tagalog version of the Hebrew Time posts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Drat, this is so interesting. Now I want to learn Tagalog too shakes fist <_<

I've never come across a language before that indicates emphasis that way! Not going to lie, I kind of love that saying day twice means "everyday" :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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I think you'll have a queue of would be Tagalog learners if it ever does get as far as the incubator. It sounds amazing. :-))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RunningFrog

I was in Spanish class once and my teacher asked me a question I didn't know and I automatically came out with "Je ne sais pas." (I don't know in French). That's probably the phrase that replaces I don't know for me. I just like it better.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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All I can remember from French is "Je suis Suisse." Funny thing is I ended up in Switzerland! ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Je ne sais pas is definitely better than "I don't know..."

3 years ago