1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Swedish
  4. >
  5. "Brandmannen talar amerikansk…

"Brandmannen talar amerikansk engelska."

Translation:The firefighter speaks American English.

February 19, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulGratrex

Do the Swedish consciously differentiate between British and American English? Can a native Swede please give me some examples of the differences you pick up on? (Native British here.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmrzlina

I'm not sure what you mean. The English spoken by Swedes is often a blend of the two, since we learn British English in school, but are bombarded with American popculture.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulGratrex

Interesting. I guess I'll find out when I go to Uppsala next month. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenbal4

Is the audio a bit off on this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

It depends on which voice you’ve got, but it sounds good with the new one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenbal4

I have the new one. "amerik" just seems so fast and run together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It sounds really natural, we often say it more like amrikansk than like amerikansk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skrats

how do you know which voice you have??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lundgren8

We switched a few months ago, so now there is only the ”new” one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berniebud

With the new one, it sounds like she mumbles the "Eri" in "Amerikansk"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Yes, we very often say it like that, more like amrikansk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/countvlad

I used 'talks' instead of 'speaks'. Marked wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cayvie

because "talk" can't take a direct object in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tianithen

Why is 'talks' not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CullenMowe

Using "talks" with a direct object sounds strange and unnatural to me, except for what feels like a specific colloquial usage, such as "to talk business/money". However, Merriam-Webster does list a possible transitive usage of "to talk" for "using a language to communicate" (like "to talk French") so it must just be my specific American dialect.

I guess it's also possible that "to talk" doesn't describe the general ability to speak a language like "to speak" does; I can't confirm because I've personally never used "talk" like this (and I also don't know whether the Swedish sentence could be specifically implying only the general ability and never the current action).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuintusMarius

When discussing languages, you would use "speak". "He talks American" sounds very improper. "He speaks American (English)" sounds much better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanyaBasto

In Germany we say Feuerwehrmann or Feuerwehrfrau.

Learn Swedish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.