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"Las instituciones cuentan con nosotros."

Translation:The institutions count on us.

5 years ago

188 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

I believe the correct translation is "The instutions are counting on us" . Even though "the institutions count with us" is what I wrote and which was accepted I believe my answer is wrong..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamontsson
Lamontsson
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Hmmm, I think "The institutions COUNT ON US" is better (and it accepted that). "The institutions are counting on us" would mean something different in English - it would mean something like "They are counting on us to do the right thing in June" or something, like for a particular event - where as "They count on us" is just "In general, they rely on us to keep themselves going."

If you make it, say, a shop "The shoe shop counts on us to continue buying shoes." whereas, "The shoe shop is having a sale, they are counting on us to be there this weekend."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Magycmyste
Magycmyste
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Thank you for clarifying this! I always responded "The institutions count with us," thinking that it seemed a bit weird. I was using the English translation to mean something along the lines of "The institutions are important to us" (along with an aristocratic nod and sniff).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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You are correct in your analysis of the difference in the English sentences. But that differentiation doesn't really exist in Spanish. Although Spanish has progressive tenses, they are used much less frequently. For the most part, the present tense encompasses both the English present and present progressive uses. But Duo's tense for tense convention means they both may not be accepted. But that is not intended to leave any impression that the present progressive is not a valid translation for the present in Spanish. Duo's convention just allows them to concentrate on the tense it wants you to practice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenverVaz
DenverVaz
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Why cant we use depende instead?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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They are similar but not synonymous. Many people count on things that they cannot depend on.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SalmanMikdas

I think so

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

I'd say it doesn't really matter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jo-bot

No, it does matter. Although "count with us" is the direct translation, it doesn't have that same meaning in English. We would never say that. It would mean the institution is literally counting (in numbers) along with us. Looks like Spanish uses "cuentar con" to mean the "relying on" meaning of "counting on". I'm also going to report the problem. Not sure why they haven't changed it in 3 years from the above post.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liam3.1415926535

You said "cuentar con," it's actually 'contar con.'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

Thank you now I understand.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

Now I think that in Spanish I could say "las intituciones piensan en nosotros" or "las instituciones lo hacen por nosotros"; If the intitutions act. But when we are us who have to do it then they count on us "Ellas cuentan con nosotros", and we act.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

I once used the "other problem" option to report that it accepted my answer but shouldn't. I agree that "the institutions count with us" is not a proper translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnruby
shawnruby
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I read somewhere that the present verb can count for present progressive, as well as near future. At least when translated into English. I think DL might go over this later down the tree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The present tense in most languages corresponds to both the present and the present progressive in English in some circumstances. Spanish does have a progressive tense as well, though. It is only used to emphasize the progressive or continuous aspect of the action, not as commonly as in English where the progressive tense indicates present action for action verbs. But because Spanish does have a progressive tense, Duo wants you to translate tense for tense. This is simply so that it can get the response that it "wants" for any translation. In other languages without a progressive tense, like German, Duo even encourages present progressive translations for the German present tense where it would be the most likely translation. It is not that it is less likely in Spanish, only that Duo uses this convention to make its job easier where there is a progressive tense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnruby
shawnruby
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thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DABurnside
DABurnside
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Lingot for you, Lynettemcw.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cg43842

i put in "the institutions count on us" which was correct

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IreneMcDer

I also gave the same answer as you samuelOrr and was correct but, I understand what you are saying and agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missmma

that also happened with me samuel.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilhelmJuan16

Fallout 4

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrei493

thats what i thought

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/08acatra

Shouldn't institutes be interchangeable with institutions

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

It isn't, not in English anyway. Institutes are very specific things, while institutions are conceptual. Marriage is an institution. So is banking. But the Institute of Banking would have a headquarters and membership and a mission statement (rob the poor, for example) and people who are assigned to carry out duties. If a university president says "this is an institution of learning" he means the whole idea of the university, including all sorts of intangibles he couldn't necessarily even articulate But if he says "go over to the Institute of Oceanography" he means go to a specific place where they are devoted to doing specific things and they had better do it right or lose their funding.

See?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jefdob

Long answer: see above.

Short answer: Institute is instituto. Institution is institución.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhoaCurtis

"rob the poor, for example" lmao XD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

I don't really mean it though. I have nothing against banks. Banks are better than keeping it under your mattress.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZakariaE2

Depends on the bank and the mattress.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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And the rate of inflation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylrrDean

Nothing wrong with banks, it's the people who run them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Ah ok. In that case, no offense taken.

It's just so easy to be sick and tired of the same old stuff constantly being complained about your profession in the media, for example. Though I've actually noticed a slight let-up recently. Mabye it's getting boring for them!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

Couldn't agree more, I was just being silly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yahoo3579

oh my gosh, i thought the same thing she gets a lingot

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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The Institute of Banking of Ireland is a not-for-profit whose mission statement is for the professional development and education of members.

But thank you for the good explination by the way!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ripcurlgirl
Ripcurlgirl
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@ flint72 How out of character and admirable for a bank. I admire them!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_Elizabeth

I'm sorry, and you are very right. It was a cheap shot for the sake of humor. Banks are the foudation of our civilization, and I am not being sarcastic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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No worry!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NLucidC

Dude she wasn't talking about your bank. She was talking about banks in general (especially in usa). Don't take everything at face value.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ripcurlgirl
Ripcurlgirl
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Beautifully articulated Clara. I, personally, like the "rob the poor" dig and, at present, it isn't much better than keeping it under your mattress.
I wish we had flint72's bank here!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poschiavo
poschiavo
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Thank you. I didn't´t know the difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kannd86

I think of institute as some scholarly place while an institution is a mental hospital. I know it does vary in English though. Maybe it's more clear cut in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

a mental institution is only one form of institution

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

In Spanish "institución" is almost anything official organism. (es casi cualquier organismo oficial)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Institutes can also be scholarly places.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/afitz777

I agree, I thought they could. In my spanish dictionary both words are a translation for instituto and vice versa.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kannd86

Why use con in this sentence? Is it an idiom? Would you ever say Cuentan en nosotros?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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yes. "cuentan con" is idiomatic for "count on"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

... and "count on" is an idiom in the first place.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neptune

… or a metaphor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaHill

Yes, it is an idiom. Yes, you could say "Cuentan en nosotros."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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I don't think so... Where is "contar en" used?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robin408090

I put "the institutions count with us," which is very different from "the institutions count on us." Is this a mistake, or are both translations correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

I think it's a mistake. "The institutions count with us" may be grammatically correct, but it doesn't make a lot of sense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

I would like to know about this too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willbyzx

They are both right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

No, "the institutions count with us" is NOT correct. I put "the institutions depend on us", which was marked wrong, but I reported it as their mistake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Outrail

Why is 'The establishments count on us' wrong when it's given as a legitimate translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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you can report it if you think that it should be correct. But remember that not "all" of the drop-downs" are necessarily legitimate choices.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barnsy
barnsy
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Report it, it is the only wat to fix it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

"establishments" here is awkward in english... though that is often the case with Duolinguo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sanmiguel82

Why is "rely" not accepted ?? :-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut2

My 'Dictionary of Spoken Spanish' gives: to rely on = depender de and contar con. So looks like they consider them interchangeable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maryereeve

This sentence could equally well be translated into English as "Institutions count on us" meaning institutions in general as opposed to specific institutions. Both translations should be accepted here because I believe the same Spanish sentence would be used to express both concepts in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keithauclair

Agreed

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lolrob_
lolrob_
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Why does institution lose the accent on the o when it becomes plural?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Normally, Spanish words ending in -n or -s are stressed on the next to last syllable. So "instituciones" does not need an accent to show that the "o" is stressed, while "institución" does.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MoggyNumNum

Can someone explain the use of 'con' in this sentence? Why is it necessary?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmyOBrien

'Contar con' is a phrase which means 'to count on' or 'to rely on'. They could also be translated separately as 'count' and 'with' to express something like 'I count with my fingers'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/molodan
molodan
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Why is the institutions count with us a right answer? What does that even mean in English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billyyo
billyyo
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As in "are important to us". Slightly awkward but it is still used this way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Folks are getting confused with the contar+con. It is a verb using both words together. Not separate. So it is not 'count with', but 'count on'

contar con-to count on

cuenta conmigo- you can rely or count on me; no cuentes con mi ayuda- don't count on my help; cuento con que no llueva- I'm counting on it not raining

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It's not like the English idiom "count on" is any less arbitrary in its choice of preposition. Nothing is actually "on" anything when we count on it. So there's really no reason to expect that any other language would choose "on" for this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billyyo
billyyo
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My wife is a native speaker and she assures me that "counts on us" is the usual translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Audrey5775

That's what I put. Tell your wife that she needs to have a DL account and go through the lessons answering everyone's questions:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davemuir_sway

So how would you say "The institutions count with us" in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

Doesn't make sense in English, so why would it in Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davemuir_sway

It's just another way of saying the institutions matter to us

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

Ah I see, but still think it is poor English

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

What's the difference between institutions and institutes??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

An Institute is a place of higher learning. And institution is an establishment

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

An institute could also be a non-teaching research facility or professional association. Of course, any entity could call itself an "institute" but those would be the most common uses.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

True.. Maybe the difference is that Institute is usually used in a title? I know the difference, but it's hard to put into words...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

" it's hard to put into words"

Can't argue with that. Trying to learn Spanish is teaching me almost as much about English as it is about Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeyPotveer

i thought WE = nosotros and US = NOS, Nuestro/A ,,,??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sonnenbluemchen

Unfortunately, it's not that clear-cut an equivalency. While nuestro/nuestra is always the possessive form and would be used where we would use "our" in English—no confusion there!—the we<>nosotros and us<>nos is a misleading guideline. As far as I can tell, "nos" is usually used as a direct object and "nosotros" when it's a subject or indirect object—that is, if there's a preposition, you use nosotros; if there's not, you use nos. So, "Ella nos da un regalo," but "Ella da un regalo a nosotros." The first has no preposition, the second has the personal a—but either way, you would use "us" in English. Does that help?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AuntieJenny

contar con = to count on

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimmoorepark

The institutions depend on us. What is the difference between "count on" and "depend on" in English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

depend on is much stronger. So my children depend on me while a sports club might count on me for support, but they on depend on their whole membership base.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/borisfromberlin

I disagree, the whole country is counting on you. In airplane Leslie Nielsons famous line, "good luck, we're all counting on you." To not crash a plane, to save their lives. Does not get much stronger than that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Archie25

Hmm, not sure I would recommend Hollywood for a good use of English, but perhaps "count on" gives a sense of a once off occasion whereas "depend on" suggests continuity.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanaru
hanaru
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How can I be sure that the real meaning of the sentece "Las instituciones cuentan con nosotros" is not as accepted "The institutions count on us" but "The istitutions take us into account" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnkelgh

Has anyone tried "The institutions check with us"? Just curios...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lishutochka

I thought institucion meant high school too???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Haizimao
Haizimao
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Can't we say " Depend on us" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busycat
busycat
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I should think so. Count on and depend are basically the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannPatrick

"upon " was not accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fred_Smits

"reckon upon us" should be accepted as well .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellylava
jellylava
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You reckon? lol Perhaps that is a rather esoteric use of the word reckon so I would doubt it. Is it widely used in your area in that way or among your social group? I'm not challenging you - I am merely interested to know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fred_Smits

reckoning upon can be in the sense of counting upon . as one can rely upon etc . It has nothing to do with my social background :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellylava
jellylava
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Thanks, I haven't heard it used that way before. Now I have. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zacariakus

I feel like "count on" and "depend on" should both be accepted here, as they are equivalent in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asupit

What is the correct tranlation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie
Rozzie
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Why wouldn't it be the institutions counts on us?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

English verbs take the -s suffix only in the third person singular (e.g. "he/she/it counts"). This is third person plural ("they count").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozzie
Rozzie
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Gracias

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin630425

Does "count on" mean the same thing in Spanish as it does in English? As in, does it mean "relies on"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El_Mercielago

It's interesting that this idiom is the same in both Spanish and English where as other idioms are completely unique. Nothing else to add really, just thought it was an interesting parallel. Keep learning! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaladoCalamar

I'm not sure if someone else has asked this, but why is the sentence "nosotros" for "us"? Shouldn't it be "nuestros"? Keep in mind I am brand new so please keep it simple.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benton.1
benton.1
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No, "nuestros" means "our".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanColina

Can't you also say Institutes? Instead of institutions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No, not really. An institute is a specialized type of institution generally for scientific or educational purposes. The Spanish word for Institute is instituto. An institution is a broader term and can refer to a physical place like a mental institution or a theoretical concept like the institution of marriage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericsluyter

Duolingo furnished as "correct" "count with us". Unless they count ALONG with us, it makes no sense as it stands.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. Theoretically the sentence could mean that they count (along) with us. That would be similar to Comieron con nosotros They ate with us. This is one of those situations where Duo cannot win for losing. If they didn't allow that, users would be upset. But it is obvious to me that this sentence was formulated so that learners would at least guess that Spanish uses con and not en to express counting "on" someone or something.

Spanish, like English, doesn't require the concept of alone to go with with, but if you wanted to directly express along with that would be junto con.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Plamen_Doykov

Why is it "CON nosotros" and not e.g. 'sobre'?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The answer is a simple but perhaps unsatisfying because prepositions are used differently in different languages. You will find dozens if not hundreds of examples where the preposition used in Spanish do not match up with English. I think in this case that is the whole purpose of this sentence to demonstrate how to say count on in Spanish. We are pre-programmed to think that the prepositions we use make sense, but in this case I think I could better construct an argument as to using count with (they make their assessment with us in the mix) as count on. That is not to say it doesn't sound strange to me nor that the use of prepositions in Spanish makes any more or less sense that English. But you will find that prepositions will be used consistently 90-95% of the time, but you have to watch out for the rest.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Plamen_Doykov

Thanks. Yes, I know prepositions often don't translate literally but was surprised Spanish is peculiar in this specific case. In French we would say "compter sur", not "avec", in Russian and Bulgarian it is "на" which is closest to the English "on", definitely not "with".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dylangenius

Bad idea

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dylangenius

The whole"they count on us thing"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanJ.Polasky

The word 'upon', in English, is equivalent to 'on' when used in the context here. It should also be regarded as correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/404consultant

The institutions depend on us is also accepted/acceptable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackSnacki
JackSnacki
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Said the group of private assassins hired by the insurance companies in a Robin Cook novel.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolfieEve

I thought you could also write "The institutions are counting on us" and not just "The institutions count on us"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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In some of the other language courses that would be acceptable and in real life that is very possibly the best translation. But since Spanish does have progressive tenses, Duo's convention is tense for tense. This is how Dúo triggers the response it wants. It is not meant to imply that the use of the progressive is parallel in the two languages. It definitely is not. English uses the progressive as the default tense to speak about current action. Spanish only uses it to emphasize the ongoing nature of the action. Nevertheless, complying with the convention, Las instituciones cuentan con nosotros is translated as The institutions count on us and Las instituciones están contando con nosotros is The institutions are counting on us. There are a few places where they have broken with the convention to have it make more sense but for the most part it is consistent.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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I wrote depend on us and was marked wrong. I think this should be accepted as a valid answer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Since contar is a true cognate in all its meanings with count and count is not at all synonymous with depend, although count on is synonymous with depend on, count is the best translation. What is being demonstrated here is that the expression to count on uses a different preposition in Spanish. To translate it as depend on misses the point. Depender is also a cognate of depend and the expression to depend on also uses a different preposition, depender de. To translate contar con to depend on sort of sidesteps the whole point of the exercise. Meaning is of course important, but how that meaning is constructed is especially the point in these learning exercises. Since I doubt you found a source that translated contar con as to depend on, the fact that you translated it as depend on means that you heard or saw count on and you then reworded it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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You are correct. I understood what count on means and wanted to see if DL would accept depend on which is synonymous in colloquial English without being a literal translation. I wasn't thinking about DL trying to teach me which preposition to use with contar. That's a good point and you can count on me to keep it in mind in future.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hablar_En_Lengua

I am curious, for the more literal translation: The institutions count WITH us.

As in actually counting, or tabulating some data; how would one say that in Spanish then?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I find it hard to imagine a circumstance where I would say that a group of institutions are counting concurrently with us, but I believe it would be the same. You have to remember that there are some distinctions you can make in one language that you can't make in another. If I said El café está caliente It could mean The coffee is hot or Coffee is hot. These differences happen both ways, but you tend to notice it more when a distinction is lacking. Luckily the use of counting with is quite limited. Beyond preschool it is pretty much limited to taking inventory, counting the collection plate, and counting down to start.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hablar_En_Lengua

Medical field, sciences, anything with large data sets.

Astronomers counting starts or other celestial bodies. That usually encompasses a few institutions working together.

Things along those lines.

I happen to work in the medical and science fields, hence why this line of questioning sprang to mind.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Point taken. Within a field the commonness of words and expressions vary. To count on is probably as common in Spanish as English, so in your industry it is possible that juntos is added to distinguish between the two expressions, but I am not sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladnil
ladnil
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When is it necessary to use "the" before an abstract noun like "institution" ? Duo counted me wrong with "Institutions count on us."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The issue is not with the abstractness of the noun, although the rule seems strangest to some extent with abstract nouns. In English when we make generalizations about something, we NEVER use the definite article. In Spanish they ALWAYS do. So whether abstract or concrete, all Generalizations use the definite article. Chocolate is delicious. El chocolate es rico. Knowledge is power. El conocimiento es poder. (el poder might be used here but it would make them exactly the same I believe) So in Spanish there is no difference between saying Chocolate is sweet (generalized) and The chocolate is sweet (specific) Of course you can always say This/that chocolate. This statement is similar. Either it is a generalization or it refers to a specific subset of institutions, so the article would be required.

As I say, it seems stranger with abstract nouns. Here is the Spanish translation of the well known passage in Corinthians

1 Corintios 13:13La Biblia de las Américas (LBLA)

13 Y ahora permanecen la fe, la esperanza y el amor, estos tres; pero el mayor de ellos es el amor

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christopher3333

Is there a specific reason in using "con" instead of "en"? Is it used in a particular association with the word "cuentan" in the understanding of what the sentence is trying to convey? If someone could please enlighten me on this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It is just the way the expression is formed. You will find many variations in the use of prepositions between languages. Since this expression is so abstract, it is hard to find any clear justification of the use of ANY preposition. To count on something sounds correct to us because that's how we say it, but when you think about it literally, it's hard to see why on is appropriate. Are the institutions sitting on us when they count? To be fair, there is not really much to justify con either. Maybe counting with us on mind. At any rate, you just have to learn which preposition to use for each expression. If it's not the same, you probably couldn't just guess.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christopher3333

Thanks! The endeavor continues.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/safkakar

The institutions count with us means they are counting together. But " the institutions count with ours" would mean that they are at par ith ours. Which sounds more logical?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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You are using your English brain on a Spanish sentence. The Spanish phrase contar con means to count on.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/To%20count%20on%20

Although prepositions have some degree of consistency in translations, when used in expressions like this, you will often not find them matching.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

So, I write "counts with us" and come here to see if something along the lines of "matters to us" is the preferred solution. I never would have guessed "counts on us" (mostly because I haven't tried to familiarize myself with the many verb+preposition pairs). I'm glad I checked, if only to discover how far off I was.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I believe that correct could be "Institutions count on us". Spanish uses the definite article to refer to words used in a general sense..

In other words, "institutions, in general, count on us " These would be inherently true, because without people running and using and counting on them, they would not be viable.

http://www1.udel.edu/leipzig/Assistant/artdef.htm\

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. Most, if not all, cases where you have an uncountable subject with a definite article have two possible translations in English. One that translates directly and one that translates without the definite article as a generalization about the subject as a whole. Such sentences never use the definite article in English, but it is required in Spanish. The same is generally true about direct objects that are uncountable. If the noun is countable, however, this is generally only applies to the plural forms. So La institución cuenta con nosotros can only mean The institution counts on us. But the plural Las instrucciones can be translated either with or without the definite article.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwesomeIndustry

Your donations help support future generations. Donate to GenericCollege today!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh868613

You could sub instituciones for personas and it would read, "Las personas cuentan con nosotros." That would be acceptable as "The people count on us." It could be the people count with us, but it needs context, like Las niños cuentan con nosotros en clase.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maria.mcna

I put, "The high schools count on us." Is this wrong?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. El instituto means high school, not la institución. Also el instituto only means high school in Spain, and Duo teaches Latin American Spanish.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/High%20school

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VeledaLorakeet
VeledaLorakeet
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So in another sentence institution was a high school... But not here? Am i mixing things up?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Just a little. Instituto can be high school. Insiticion is institution

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmbrauch
tmbrauch
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For the previous question, "Soy un estudiante de instituto." I translated it as "I am a student of the institute." And was wrong, suggesting I use "high school." This, the next question, I use "high school" and it tells I am wrong because I have to use "institute."

Without context, there's no way we can tell which it wants.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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There is a difference between the Spanish words el instituto and la institución. Instituto can mean high school or institute (I am surprised they marked you off, I know at least one or two exercises accept both.) But institución is a perfect cognate to our word institution.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanDa17

i translated to institutes and it was counted wrong. It wanted institutions.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertDuke

First institute is marked as wrong for instituto, being a high school. Now when I mark it high schools am marked wrong because the answer is institute. How confused is DuoLingo???

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It seems as if many people get confused by these two words, which I don't really understand because they are easy cognates of two different words in English. Instituto is Institute, which can, but does not always, means high school in Spanish Institución is Institution, and is a perfect cognate for our word. Institución and instituto are not synonymous, although of course an instituto is one of many, many types of institutions.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Institución%20

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Instituto

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StarlitTardis

I've been told that 'institution' is both 'el instituto' and 'la institucion'. Is this a mistake, or does it vary depending on context?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think that is a mistake. The words are actually pretty perfect cognates for the English words institute and institution, although most schools that are called institutes in English are colleges, not high schools. (M.I.T, R. P. I). Of course, like the English word institution, institución is a broader term so that all institutos are instituciones. But, as I said, the English words are good cognates, so it is nothing that your English word sense doesn't tell you.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Instituto

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Institución%20

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phthalo_
Phthalo_
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So, because "institucion" can mean both "institution" and "high school" (I believe), would another correct translation of this be, "The high schools count on us," or simply, "High schools count on us"? ¡Gracias!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No. Institución does NOT mean high school. Instituto can mean high school or institute. Institución is a perfect cognate of institution. Como en inglés, todos los institutos son instituciones, pero no todas las instituciones son institutos.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phthalo_
Phthalo_
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That makes sense. Thank you for your response! :)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foopiboi
Foopiboi
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Why not nos instead of nosotros ?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Well con has some special forms (conmigo and contigo), but that is not this. The bottom line is that the pronouns that either preceed the verb or attach to the end of appropriate verb forms are all different from the pronoun that is the object of a preposition. I have mentioned the special forms for con, but for other prepositions like a, de, por, para, the yo and tú forms are mi and ti, but all other forms are the same as the subject pronoun (él, ella, usted, nosotros, (vosotros in Spain) ellos, ellas and ustedes).

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AzureFlames
AzureFlames
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What's the difference between "la institución" and "el instituto"? Some of the other comments were not as clear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellylava
jellylava
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I wrote "institutions count on us" & it was marked wrong. It seems grammatically correct in English so would the Spanish be written differently for that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillDeak

What is wrong with "depend on" vs count on?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheYazman

Sounds like communist propaganda to me...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
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for donations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThisOldSpouse

A bit off topic but, "Marriage is a great institution but who wants to spend their life in an institution." :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sweatersss

The institution counts on me, because I am the only person attending.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The3rdBeast

If "institutions" wasn't plural in this sentence, it would sound like something the X-men would say. (Because their base is an institution).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chellger

I just wanted you to know, we are all counting on you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elliot503804

I think the voice is very nad on this one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SavannahRowan

anyone here feel like there is a Fallout 4 reference in here somewhere?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susannafulcher

Spanish is confusing .

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That's only because it is different from the language you learned to think in.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamaCo872374
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/intelleckttt

Has anyone found the lesson on Idioms to be helpful?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.godfrey

Que?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isaacishumble
isaacishumble
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XD XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/littleshark55

I put the exact same as the translation

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vlauntern

Why so serious?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Douglas_W
Douglas_W
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I wrote: the institutions DEPEND on us. Rejected?

dOUG

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timgbrandes

Said Tsipras, so the people accept their poverty, at least the bank owners get "their" money....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Formosast

If count with us is accepted as a translation, could the spanish phrase also mean the institutions are important to us?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That count with us is accepted is Duo bowing to pressure that it theoretically COULD be translated as such. What count with us means in English is that when we say one two three they do as well. The idea is rather absurd, but theoretically possible if you consider employees the institutions. For any Spanish speaker this sentence means the equivalent to count on us.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billy8195

DEW NEH MOH LOH.

3 years ago