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"Ik houd van jou."

Translation:I love you.

3 years ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/VickyMurra1

Awwwww This is the first thing my husband (dutchman) taught me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reanbell

Mine too. And he said "ik hou van jou" not houd, so i'm confused; sounds like a lot of dutchies spit on their own grammar rules lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It can be both ik houd and ik hou, though when expressing yourself formally you should use houd.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zax337

Could'nt it be also tranlasted as "I like you"? Is there a real difference between the two verbs in dutch? Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Voorlindsay

If "houden van" is used with a person it always means "love". "like" would mean "leuk vinden" just not yet "love"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skeeterbyte

I was confused because another sentence "Jij houdt van rijst" was translated "You like rice." But rice is not a person, so I get your point.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zax337

Ok, I got it. Thanks a lot! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertaSpiga

Actually my Ducth friend told me it also means "I like you", but "I love you" it's a more common meaning for it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esposch
esposch
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My South African girlfriend taught me "ek is lief vir jou".

Surprised to find that the Dutch is so different.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazerlo
lazerlo
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I find that South Africans can pick up on a lot of what the dutch say but the dutch have no clue what the S. Africans are taking about.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elardus

lazerlo: For an Afrikaans speaker Dutch is very easy to understand (I'd say 95% in reading if not orally as the pronunciation differences can be a bit tricky). However there are some marked linguistic differences, including a few False Friends, one being that 'Ik houd van jou' ('Ek hou van jou'), in Afrikaans definitively does not mean 'I love you'! (It means 'I like you'). For Dutch speakers, Afrikaans is probably over-simplistic (which I suppose can be a mild irritation for both Dutch and Deutsch) in that it uses only one definite article (die) (same then as English in that regard) and that it does not distinguish between I, you, he, she, it, we, they in present tense verbs. In that sense, to Afrikaners Dutch is more like English (Ik spreek, hij/zij spreekt, wij/zij/jullie spreken whereas in Afrikaans it would simply be 'spreek' regardless of the personal pronoun, therefore 'ek/hy/sy/ons/hulle/julle spreek'. (None of this I speak but he speaks or I am but you are/ik ben maar jij bent). I feel tempted to say that Afrikaans is a more user-friendly version of Dutch (without losing anything in the way of idiomatic ability), though on the other hand it (formally) does not get away with as many anglicisms as it has rather evolved unique Afrikaans words where Dutch simply stick to English, for example cricket terms. I have often asked (non-South African) Dutch speakers how much they understand of Afrikaans. Just like for us, it seems reading it is not generally a problem (except for obviously unique words not originally germanic or latin) but the battle is with the accent.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YvonneJanssen

there is an alternative in dutch for: ik hou van jou

Ik heb je lief, seems much more like the south african

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConchiCastillo
ConchiCastillo
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They have the exact same expression in German: "Ich hab(e) dich lieb". Speaking German clearly gives you a huge advantage!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapnJake49
CapnJake49
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Deutsch ist deutlich!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elardus

Agreed YJ. In Afrikaans we say 'Ek het jou lief' (or sometimes a lazy 'Ek lief jou' after English).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lupellus
Lupellus
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100% correct, and in Afrikaans "Ek hou van jou" means "I like you".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snailpi.

maar dit kan ook i like you wees, party sinne in germaanse tale het meer as een vertaling

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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In Dutch this is only used to say I love you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elanie496917

then when would "houd" be used for "like"? because in one of the other examples it could've been both

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • Between people = to love
  • Other things = to love or to like
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elanie496917

I am South African, and believe me I don't get this dutch saying at all. because in afrikaans we would say "ek is lief vir jou" for I love you and "ek hou van jou" for I like you. so for the translation of this sentence i went with I like you, because previously an example said that "houd" could be like or love. yet like was wrong here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cosmimic_girl

Is not correct "ik HOU van jou"? I have seen this sentence writen like this but I don't know if its ok

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luckas_Catojo
Luckas_Catojo
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If I'm not wrong, both options are okay, but "houd" would be more formal, I guess. I've seen something like it somewhere, but, as I said, I'm not sure. ^^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sploof
Sploof
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Not sure i formally want to tell anyone i love them?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Your grandparents for instance (although it's also common in the Netherlands to use je rather than u to address grandparents).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dennie54
dennie54
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Susande, I guess it's regional, or even a personal thing. I never use a formal 'I love you.'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beyzaw
beyzaw
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Ahh this was the first dutch I learned, the boy I love is dutch and he is also the reason why I started learning this language

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NattyNice

Ik houd van jou te

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce_OBrien

Ik hou ook van jou.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie010403

I've seen this a few times and I'm still quite confused buy it. Why is "van" necessary? Does houd have a different meaning without it?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miacomet
miacomet
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Some verbs just need prepositions with them. It's like how in English, you don't say "I replied your email," you say "I replied to your email." The "van" is just part of how the verb works.

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    The stressed object pronouns become so easy when comparing between the literally meaning of the second possessive pronouns' table :)

    EditDelete1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Souliloquy_
    Souliloquy_
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    Is this like a romantic love, or a friend/family love?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Chris294025

    How is the van used in this lesson?

    1 year ago