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"¡No me diga!"

Translation:Do not tell me!

5 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/awesomespectrum

I think the translation should be "You don't say!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk1ph1x
sk1ph1x
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Ambas respuestas "You don't say" y "Don't tell me" son correctos y deben ser aceptadas.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mtthwf
mtthwf
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Yeah, I remember this phrase from the Pimsleur Spanish tapes I listened to as a teenager. They always translated it as "you don't say."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ELTA651133
ELTA651133
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Yea, it coukd be the same, but if you translate "you don't say, literally, its" tu no digas", at final its the same, but this sentences are used in different cases

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Manny.Delgado
Manny.Delgado
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...he's in bed with José from the liquor store

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stella.sud8
stella.sud8
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Yeah all right: I know that the literal translation would be "Do not tell me!" but honestly: who says that?! GET OUT OF HERE!! that is the right one or I can't speak english!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grafduckula
grafduckula
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Is it really that uncommon? For example in a conversation like this" - "I watched the new episode of Game of Thrones yesterday. Guess who dies this time!" - "I don't want to know! Don't tell me!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brizz99

Todos mueren.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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However, that does have a somewhat different meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogduo
rogduo
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Get out of here is correct, and also ¨you don´t say¨

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowith
rowith
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oh! I know, I know. Don't tell me!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ELTA651133
ELTA651133
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The common phrases in Spanish are not used as a common phrase in English, "dont tell me" sounds .. strange so, you use another way to say the same, but in spanish is common to say " no me digas" For example " no me digas la respuesta"= " dont tell me the answer"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RocattaTait

Well...if I know someone's name but can't think of it I might say "Don't tell me" or maybe in disbelief "Don't tell me it already happened."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Romanman75

This is going to sound pretty nitpicky, but "diga" doesn't seem to be a form at all for the second person, both in the subjunctive and imperative (positive and negative). What's more, the Spanish speakers in this thread keep giving examples using the form "digas," which seems to be correct.

Can any native speakers clarify why this might be?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abs1973
abs1973
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"No me digas" is the correct form for the singular second person pronoun (tú), but if you used the formal one (usted) then the correct way is "no me diga".

In Spain we used tú for the singular and vosotros for the plural, and usted and ustedes only in very formal situations. In latin america spanish "usted" is used a lot, not only in formal situations, as the singular 2º person pronoun, and "ustedes" is always used as the plural 2º person pronoun. (they never say "vosotros sois" but "ustedes son")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent
itastudent
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English is not my native language, but I guess another idiomatic translation is "Tell me about it" (that is literally almost the opposite)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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"Tell me about it!" when said in an annoyed or sarcastic tone of voice usually means, in response to a complaint or negative comment, "I agree" or "I know!" It is used commonly among friends or in informal situations. "You don't say!" COULD mean the same thing if said in a mocking tone of voice, but in my experience, it usually expresses surprise upon learning some unexpected information (often in gossiping). English is definitely a crazy language in the U.S.!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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No, it has to be negative, because of the No in the Spanish sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent
itastudent
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In fact I was not talking about a literal translation.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=tell%20me%20about%20it

I feel that in those examples, "tell me about it" could be translated with "no me digas" with no problem, although it's not perfectly literal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groichina

I am Spanish and this sentence can be used in two ways. 1) When someone says something that is very obvious. For example: El cielo es azul. - ¡No me digas! 2) When someone tells you something that surprises you. For example: He tenido un bebe. - ¡No me digas! que alegría.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lphoenix

Thanks, this is helpful. In English both situations would also be handled with the same phrase: "You don't say!" as Awesomespectrum says below. The tone of voice would indicate either a bit of sarcasm or surprise.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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I couldn't find Awesomespectrum's comment, so I hope mine (below) was not repetitious. As you say, Iphoenix, TONE OF VOICE can totally change the meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lphoenix

But now I'm wondering, suppose you actually don't want a person to tell you something? Would it still be "No me dija"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groichina

Yes it is also correct, but I guess I would say "¡no me lo digas!" or "¡no me digas nada!" in this case. Those are small nuances anyway :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/guelen13

Iphoenix, then I guess I would say " Do not tell me that".IMO

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaby16761

In the heights anyone?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stumbler
Stumbler
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This section is really finicky on translations. Often you have to avoid the idiomatic translation into English and often there is no direct way to express a Spanish subjunctive in English. I know the meaning but it's a crap shoot to see if Duolingo will accept my translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertForstag

This is a common idiomatic expression equivalent to "You don't say" (which, however, is scored here as INCORRECT).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonKerr

Would "Don't say it to me" be wrong as DL tells me?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WandaDancy

I sure did not figure this one out.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/convergent
convergent
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What is wrong with, "do not speak to me?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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That would be more like No me hable. Say and speak have about the same relationship in English as decir and hablar do in Spanish. They overlap, but aren't completely synonymous.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Markaysa
Markaysa
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Can everyone totally understand the voice? I cannot hear the difference between " no me diga" and "no me digas".??? I had both come up in the same session to day!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffinwoman

So is this sarcastic? like the current use of the phrase "shut up" which when I was growing up was a "bad word?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PapyrusUns
PapyrusUns
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Can it also be "No me digas?" I was wondering, as that's how I've heard it before, though I've heard this too. Just wondering.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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In a TV show, I heard this used like "Don't call me that." I know that's not a literal translation but that's what I heard.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielAlcivarM
DanielAlcivarM
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"No me diga!..Noo me digaa?.."

"Que pasó?"

"No me dijo."

-Cantinflas-

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LouisMaxBl

The Spanish Duolingo is the worst. Not cross-checked with bilinguals, it seems. Is there a Latin American and a Spanish version, actually? I live part of the year in Spain and ee speak a complete different Spanush than what has been used by Duolingo in North America. I also learn French through the app and it seems authentic. French french not Canadian French that is

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/birdfeatherss
birdfeatherss
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doesn't no me diga mean, "no way", as in an exclamation of disbelief?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewViceroy

"Don't tell me" was marked wrong, but there's no option choice to report it!

1 month ago