https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Practicality of Adding Frisian to Duolingo

I'd like to prefix this with: I am unsubscribed from the Duolingo in English discussion board due to negativity, spam, hate, harassment, etc... I know there are LOADS of "Add Japanese! Add Afrikaans!" threads, that's really not what this is. I want to post it here because it is most relevant to Dutch and I feel like this Dutch learner community on Duolingo is far more positive and helpful than other areas of Duolingo.

I am really attracted to the Frisian language. It's 100% not useful to speak at all, even if you live in the Netherlands I'm sure. That doesn't really matter to me though, because I like languages on how they sound. I also like less-common languages, and Frisian is very special for that. Fryslân has an extremely beautiful landscape from what I've seen, and it looks very relaxed.

So, my overall question is: Do you think Frisian would ever be adding to Duolingo, or is it so uncommon and useless to non-native speakers of Fries that it would never be added to Duolingo even within two or three years? On top of this, are there currently any good sources to learn Frisian? If not, how would one go about doing this? And is it easy to teach yourself a language without something like Duolingo? Probably won't start it soon, but I do have interest in it.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Frisian is an active language with some 440.000 speakers (source: wikipedia) in the province Fryslân (in Dutch: Friesland, 650.000 inhabitants). And in that province it's the official language alongside Dutch. It's part of the Frisian culture and history. So it is definitely a language that can potentially be added to Duolingo.

On the other hand, you can live in Fryslân without problem if you have no knowledge of Frisian. Also in the rest of the Netherlands it's hardly ever helpful. So I guess there are quite some languages that will be higher on the priority list. But if there are skilled and motivated contributors and if people want to learn the language, I don't see why it cannot be added in the future.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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Start here maybe: friesetaal.org Im guessing most Frisian materials will be in Dutch, but you got that covered!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lernhase
Lernhase
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Did you know that there is a Frisian TV station? Check out Omrop Fryslân. Not so useless after all!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P_Azul
P_Azul
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If Duolingo stick around long enough, then I expect it will. (Links: http://funwithfrisian.blogspot.nl/ http://www.allezhop.de/frysk/ .) Once you have a grasp of the structure, there's Frisian radio at http://www.omropfryslan.nl/live/omrop-fryslan-radio . (Note that the news is first Dutch news in Dutch, and next Frisian news in Frisian.) It's not ideal, of course, since you don't get parallel information, but the spoken word and some of the songs will provide the sounds and melody of the language. I suggest the matter of whether it's useful to learn Frisian be laid to rest, lest we get discussions that are not about the language itself.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doktorkampi
doktorkampi
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Why would a language be 100% not useful? Ask its speakers. Frisian deserves to be in Duolingo as much as Dutch, Irish or even English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Well, unless you live in the Netherlands, the probability you will encounter a person every day of your life who ONLY speaks Fries is very low. 99.9% useless, but if you live in the Netherlands, somewhat useful, and if you life in Friesland, then very useful.

How do I force Frisians to make a course? XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barzun

I have a very close friend, who speaks Frisian natively. Him and his twin sister. It's their mother tongue, and they moved to the States when they were seventeen. They're not on Duolingo.

At least, not yet.

evil laugh

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P_Azul
P_Azul
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You're talking about people with such golden rules as "Rather dead than a slave", and you're considering forcing them into anything? Can I suggest some novel approaches, like inviting them or asking their help?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Tying them to a bedpost and forcing them to translate "Waarom heb je een eend?" into Fries sounds much more effective to me. XD

Well it is a lot to ask of someone, lots of work. If only there were more Frisians! :[

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lee_livingston
lee_livingstonPlus
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Lol - Besides, never trust the information gathered from people under stress/duress.

Many years ago I went to the Defense Language Institute. It was quite common for students from the different language schools to ask to learn basic vocabulary from each other. I can't tell you how many times I heard Russian language students teach the students from the other schools how to count to five. But instead of 'one, two, three, four, five' in Russian, they taught them: 'I, eat, s***, every, day'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P_Azul
P_Azul
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Nah; you'd have to build an indestructible bed with bedposts, just to find when you're done that they don't react favourably to such an approach. Anyway, since you now already know that that's "Wêrom hasto in ein?", tying people to bedposts over it is rather useless.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
xaghtaersis
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Het zou wel apart zijn. Maar waaom ook niet hé? ( Would be interesting. But why not?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MusingThoughts

It is practical and easy for an English speaker (yes Frisian is English' closest relly). There is West, North and Saterland Frisian dialects so which one do you mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

The Twarres one :D She's bae. Are they similar enough like Nederlands/Vlaams or are they very different like Deutsch/Schweizerdeutsch? In that case it wouldn't matter and the most popular one would be best for Duolingo.

To be honest, I feel like Dutch is closer... I mean, I haven't looked into Frisian, but looking at Dutch vs Frisian, Dutch just seems closer. Frisian is basically Old English (very similar I mean) so I know it technically should be closer, but tige nei’t sin yn’t wolnimmen doesn't look anything like "nice to meet you" (or aangenaam kennis te maken, for the record)... lol.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P_Azul
P_Azul
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I don't know what your source is, but you'd be saying something like "nice nice" there. "Tige nei it sin!" (Much to [my] liking!) would be enough. [Actually "the liking".] "Yn it wolnimmen!" (Something like: To [my] enjoyment. ) would work as well, I guess. [Again "the".]

Twarres sing in West Frisian. To demonstrate the relation to English: That name is a dialect form of "twaris" - "twa-ris" - two times. In English, with a soft r, that becomes "twais", though for historical reasons it's actually spelt "twice" there. Same for "trije-ris", trice. In Dutch, on the other hand, I don't think such a suffix exists.

Differences did creep in since Anglo-Saxon times: In English those combinations are now fixed, but in Frisian there's nothing to stop you from saying twenty-five-ris: "Fiifentweintichris" (five-and-twenty -ris).

See, you're learning Frisian at Duolingo, just like you wanted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

But not fully :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P_Azul
P_Azul
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Not fully? Are you shirking your lessons? Shame on you. Say "Myn ein yt brea." five times. (My duck eats rye bread.) Then translate "Wêrom yt myn ein rys?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreaderclt
mreaderclt
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If you have any interest in becoming a professor of Germanic languages, then Frisian would be a nice addition to your skill set.

But there's nothing wrong with learning for the sake of learning. I wish you luck.

I'd be curious myself just to see how close it really is to English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Not really interested in become a professor of anything lol... Frisian is just a cute language. XD

I wish Frisians would sacrifice themselves to this wonderful cause and make a Frisian course. ;~;

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauloRogerio7
PauloRogerio7
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There are three varieties of Frisian: West Frisian, Saterland Frisian, and North Frisian. Some linguists consider these three varieties, despite their mutual unintelligibility, to be dialects of one single Frisian language, whereas others consider them to be three separate languages, as do their speakers. West Frisian is strongly influenced by Dutch, and, similar to Dutch, is described as being "between" English and German. The above mentioned is also from Wikipedia, quite interesting, but a bit too regional for people who are not familiar whith their mother languages Dutch, German and part of Denmark. I give my vote, to support !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

I'd wanna learn the one closest to old English. That's probably West Frisian?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/P_Azul
P_Azul
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Of course, in reality West Frisian, Saterland Frisian, and North Frisian are mutually intelligible, more so than e.g. Geordie and Cockney, I imagine. If you want to learn the Frisian closest to Old English, then you might want to go into academic studies, as mentioned above, and learn Old Frisian. However the members of Twarres might not easily understand what you say, since they speak Modern West Frisian.

English didn't stand still over the past millennium or so, and neither did Frisian. That's not to say that "thinne hund" will not be recognised as "dyn hûn" (your dog) at all , just that the latter developed in a direction different from "thy hound".

But since you're already learning West Frisian, I suggest you keep at it, even if it is a millennium away from Old English:

De man yt in fisk. - The man eats a fish.

3 years ago
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