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  5. "He walks after me."

"He walks after me."

Translation:Han går efter mig.

February 22, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bazananant

is this a direct translation? "he walks after me" sort of meaning "he is following me" or "chasing after me"
or is it more... "I walked first, he walked after me, and she walked last." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

It means first you walked, then he walked. The creepy way is han följer efter mig, "he is following me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaniAl-seb

Åker is used when you take other means of transportation than your legs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alfsl

Still confused on dig n mig


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

You've likely figured this out by now, but "mig" is like "me", and "dig" is like "thou", which is the older form of "you". You can sometimes substitute Swedish "d" for English "th"....där/there, for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Hara

"Han promenerar efter mig." Isn't this also valid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swede100

i don't think so


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThePet081

It depends on context. "Han går" can also mean "he leaves/he's going", in which case "promenerar" wouldn't have the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabian691952

I cant hear the "efter" clearly.

How is it pronounced, thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBorkBorkBork

Almost like English after. Just change the af to the way you pronounce the name of the letter 'f' in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeleHeike

Can anybody explain the difference between efter and bakom? Why not 'Han går bakom mig.' ? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

"Bakom" is "behind". "Efter" usually implies there was a time lag of some sort, as in "he left after I did".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CymruLlewes

It sounds like some explaining a processional line up. Like for a wedding or graduation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvitaDieri

should be behind instead of after, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

Not necessarily. Maybe he started walking a bit later. "He walked (out the door) after me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kierkegaardianer

I'm having trouble understanding why går is preferred over åker. Could someone please explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaMorris

"Går" is specifically walks, although it can also mean "go", in a general sense. "Jag går till stan"...I'm going to the city, though not necessarily on foot. But "åker" is travel in/on a vehicle, NOT walking.

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