1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "An leac oighir."

"An leac oighir."

Translation:The ice.

February 22, 2015

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magickman

Does this term refer to all kinds of ice, or just 'a slab of ice' in particular?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/larryone

"The sheet ice" rejected. Hmmm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Collar85

I've personally never heard that in English. "Ice sheet", yes. "Sheet of ice", yes. "Sheet ice", no.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyndha

For reference, in my region of Scotland (Glasgow) "sheet ice" is often used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torowan

Check out http://www.hoteldeglace-canada.com/ :) But you might not want to stay the night in their bed, if you fear they will take it literally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moira_the_Dragon

We use it in America


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricky528429

Whats wrong with just saying "an t-oighir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1487

oighir is the genitive form. Without leac, you would have an t-oighear.

But oighear has a dual meaning, so in normal speech, "the ice" is almost always an leac oighir.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niallktin

All 3 pronunciations on focloir pronounce the r at the end. Cad é an scéal ansin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1487

You were listening to the pronunciation of oighear, with a broad r.

The r in leac oighir is a slender r, and she is pronouncing it here.

You can hear the contrast on teanglann.ie (the same recordings as focloir.ie).

oighear
haca oighir


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niallktin

You're a fountain of knowledge! Grma

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.