Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"We hope that there is more research."

Translation:Esperamos que haya más investigación.

5 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jevsimmons

I had learned that anything to do with someone wanting or hoping for something you need to switch the tense. that's why it's not hay, but haya.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenatom
greenatom
  • 25
  • 14
  • 14
  • 8
  • 4
  • 277

Technically the subjunctive is a mood, not a tense. Haya is subjunctive mood, present tense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ntbush

Because this is present subjunctive, are you hoping more research currently exists? If you are hoping more research will be done in the future, is the future subjunctive needed? hubiere?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levelledout

I think the sentence could be interepreted as hoping that more research currently exists. However it could also be interpreted as hoping that there will be more research. The reason for this is that the Spanish future subjunctive is very rarely used. Instead the present subjunctive is used for either present or future events.

Because of this I think that "We hope that there will be more research" should be an acceptable translation, I haven't had the chance to try it so don't know if it's accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

They are hoping there might/ would be more research in the future (there might be = subjunctive).
If "hope there IS more research...", the "is" would make it indicative in English.

In English, it would be a present subjunctive.

I'm not sure English has a future subjunctive. Perhaps, "I hope that, next year, there might be more research."

Or, "if we were to study more, we would get better grades."

See these on English Subjunctive. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/grammar_subjunctive.html

Regards Spanish future subjunctive---------------:

The future subjunctive (el futuro del subjuntivo) is a verbal mode rarely used in modern Spanish. It was traditionally used in complex sentences with WEIRDO verbs that described a hypothetical, future action.

Nowadays, the present subjunctive is used in virtually all cases in which the future subjunctive would have been used, but the future subjunctive does still appear, primarily in legal documents and literary contexts, so it’s good to be able to recognize it. http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100059/future-subjunctive#.V919Kk0VDAU/

See also this: http://grammarist.com/grammar/subjunctive-mood/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elvolcanchapin

No. Technically, there is a future subjunctive, and it is as you suggest, but's only used in old texts, such as the bible and very technically correct documents. In modern Spanish, you would use the past and present subjunctive to serve this purpose. It is good to know about future subjunctive though, especially if you're going to be poking around in Spanish literature.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

It's because of the "que", Esperar que... Querer que... If the 2nd verb is not infinitive, it's subjonctive instead of indicative.

Indicative present = hay
Subjonctive present = haya (because "que haya")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
  • 22
  • 21
  • 21
  • 11
  • 11
  • 3
  • 814

hay unos pocos más indicadores por el uso de subjuntivo: http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/subj1.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Good article.
Also see these on "Subjunctive triggers." I have found these two articles also to be extremely useful. http://spanishplus.tripod.com/index.htm#TopOfP http://www.spanishdict.com/guide/expressing-wishes-and-desires-with-the-subjunctive

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

jev: Felicidades!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleGoetz
KyleGoetz
  • 15
  • 14
  • 8
  • 4
  • 2

As a note, if you said más investigaciones instead, then you'd have to use hayan instead of haya (because plural).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola KyleGoetz: No. "haya" is singular and plural in the present subjunctive, just like "hay" in the present indicative

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

No, it would be "Espero que haya más investigaciones".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcMcWilliams

I'm not sure who is right, but I put "Esperamos que hay más investigaciones." And was marked wrong.

Suggested correct answer was "Esperamos que hayan más investigaciones."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
  • 25
  • 19
  • 5

I definitely would trust what Lisagnipura (who's no longer active, unfortunately for us) and Royraju say (both are native speakers) than Duolingo. :D!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
  • 25
  • 23
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 540

I would note that Duo often has an ordered list of accepted answers (from the best to the worst) and it checks our answers against that list and then outputs the final one if we don't match any.

"Hay" doesn't match so it gave you an acceptable answer, but probably not the best one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RHM3
RHM3
  • 19
  • 12
  • 9

I struggled with the haber lesson more than any other lesson. I asked my Spanish speaking wife for some help with this one. Here is how I keep things straight in my mind, although I'm sure it is not 100% accurate. Also, there are cases where words can be interchanged. I hope it is somewhat helpful:

hay - use this when talking about the present

habrá- use this when you are talking about the future and you are sure something will happen (there will be cake are the party)

haya - use this when you are not sure but are hoping (or dreading) something will happen in the future (I hope there will be cake at the party)

hubo - use this when describing something that occurred in the past that you did not necessarily experience first hand (there was a concert last night)

habia - use this when describing something from the past that you experienced first hand (there was a lot of people at the concert I went to last night).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterB44

Hi RHM3, thanks for this, it is not only helpful, it cuts right through all the waffle. Thank you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twinhealthnut

Thanks for your tip. It is refreshing to see such a useful explanation without all the fancy linguistic jargon about the names of different tenses.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JellyLady1

Thank you, this is definitely helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenO47830

Thank you

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mesa67

Ojalá que haya la oportunidad de usar la palabra "ojalá".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellenkeyne
ellenkeyne
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 659

The correction I received was "You used the él/ella/usted form 'habrá' instead of the yo form 'haya'. Why on earth would this take a first-person form?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnfreimanis

So the solution given is "Esperamos que haya más investigación". Where does "haya" come from? It's not in the conjugation list for "haber", nor is it suggested when hovering over the sentence. I said "Esperamos que hay más investigación"; why is that wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

You can't say "Esperamos que hay más investigación" because you need to use the subjuctive here (always after "esperar que"). "Haya" es el presente de subjuntivo del verbo "haber". Maybe you need to check a complete conjugation of the verbs, not only the suggestions that appear in Duolingo.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I know this grammar ... I do ... but I can rarely produce it when speaking conversationally. {{sigh}} A Spanish speaker told me "don't worry about it so much; we know what you mean". Do you agree?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

Estoy completamente de acuerdo. Lo entenderíamos perfectamente. Así que no te preocupes demasiado por el subjuntivo, es solo cuestión de tiempo y de práctica. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

:-)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnfreimanis

Ah yes, I completely forgot this was subjunctive. It's clear now. Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

De nada. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

but in a previous example this sentence was translated as "...there WILL be..." so is haya used as the subjunctive present tense ie "we hope that there IS..." as well as the subjunctive future tense ie " we hope that there WILL be..." ?? I know there is a subjunctive future tense ( hubiere) but it never seems to be used...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Johnfreimanis: "Haya" is the subjunctive version of "hay"; "hay" means "there is" or "there are"; "haya" means "there may be" or 'There might be" or "there will be" ,etc., depending on the context.

"Hay" and "Haya" are related to "haber:, but really they are extra verb forms unto themselves.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Hola Johnfreimanis: I never check the so-called "drop-down hints". They are not reliable. Better to check a good old-fashioned Spanish/English dictionary or an online translation service. CHAU EDIT: Or a good Spanish verb book, like "501 Spanish Verbs".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnRon

Good advice. The hints are often misleading.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hielo16

I'm of the opinion that this unit should be split into two lessons.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/macie94

I dont understand all this subjunctive and indicative talk. Could someone please explain in simpler terms?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sherylw
sherylw
  • 25
  • 16
  • 13

Subjunctive is used when the sentence shows more of an expression, desire, hope or need: pienso QUE, deseo QUE, espero QUE, necesito QUE, quiero QUE...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I believe we use the subjunctive more than people may think. [subjunctive].

It is also my belief that if English speakers better understood [were to understand better] the English subjunctive, then the Spanish subjunctive would be much easier. [Conditional and two subjunctives.]

I find that the English subjunctive and the Spanish subjunctive have many similarities. Long live the subjunctive! {subjunctive}.

These can help:

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/grammar_subjunctive.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv105.shtml http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/subjunctive_mood.htm This is good.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/subj1.htm

Look at this page for a fairly decent explanation. I agree that this is really confusing, since we really don't make a distinction on this in English. I thought I had a really good knowledge of grammar, but I had no idea what a "mood" was!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MJMGruver
MJMGruver
  • 25
  • 10
  • 1202

We do use it a little in English. For example, you might say "If I were to go to the store, then . . . " In the indicative you would use "I was going to the store". The 'were' is subjunctive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SlickJimmy
SlickJimmy
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 4

Ya sé que la respuesta correcta es "haya" para "there is", pero probé el futuro subjuntivo y puse "hubiere". La programa indicó que esa palabra era incorrecto. ¿No enseñan el futuro subjuntivo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
  • 18
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

El futuro del subjuntivo ya no se usa en el español hablado o escrito moderno, salvo en ciertas frases hechas como: "sea lo que fuere" (whatever it is). Fuera de eso, solo se usa en los libros de leyes, tal vez podrían enseñarlo en la unidad de política.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

So you change 'hay' to 'haya' when it's not at the beginning of the sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

No, it doesn't have anything to do with the position in the sentence. "Hay" is indicative, and "haya" is subjunctive, both of the verb "haber".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khaakenajaf

haya? why ??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TallRoberto

'hay' means 'There is' marked wrong.....

3 months ago