1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "Tá i bhfad níos mó uisce acu…

" i bhfad níos uisce acu."

Translation:They have much more water.

February 22, 2015

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellie-bell

I would say they have way more but that's possibly just bad English:) it wasn't accepted anyway


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

It's not "bad English", just a bit informal.

The NEID does include that meaning in it's definition of "way":

"it's way easier" - "tá sé i bhfad níos éasca", "is fusa i bhfad é"
http://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilverPill

Is the a in acu generally pronounced if the preceding word ends with a vowel or does it just sound like that for another reason in the recording?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

The "a" is pronounced, but because it's very similar to the sound of the "e" in "uisce", and they run into one another, they are hard to distinguish.

In a phrase like "Tá páistí acu", it is easier to distinguish the "a" in "acu".
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/9640736


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spectria.limina

What exactly is happening here? This literally translates as "They have more water in length", right? Is the "in length" (i bhfad) what turns into the "much" adverb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

What does literal translation have to do with anything? If "literal translation" was any good, we would have had computerized translation service in the 1970's.

i bhfad acts as an intensifier for comparative forms - i bhfad níos mó - "much more", "way more", "lots more", etc.
i bhfad níos sine - "much older", "a lot older", "a good bit older"
i bhfad níos costasach - "much more expensive", "significantly more expensive"
i bhfad níos éasca - "much easier", "way easier", "easier by far"

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.