"Het is dure thee."

Translation:It is expensive tea.

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dzhocef
Dzhocef
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It is dear tea? Is this a duolingo sentence? Ik ben een appel?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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The given translation is "It is expensive tea". However, in the UK (and maybe Aus/NZ?) they also use "dear" to mean "expensive", so that is accepted too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theredcebuano

Really? That's kind of close to the Tagalog word "mahal" which means either expensive, loved (the adjective type) and to love. Like: Mahal ko ang chaa (I love the tea,) Yung chaa ay mahal niya (the tea is loved by her) and Yung chaa ay mahal (the tea is expensive.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sollihein
Sollihein
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Nice to know that. I thought mahal in Tagalog only meant love. In Malay mahal means only one thing - expensive - one of the meanings in Tagalog

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I suppose you could look at it as having high emotional value/importance or having high (what's the word I'm looking for here) monetary(?) value.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Megairathewitch
Megairathewitch
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In Latvian, an adjective "dārgs" means both expensive and (emotionally) dear, too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Demeter567698

Same in Ukrainian, russian, Slovak, Czech, and a quite a few other languages

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lidiel_silva
lidiel_silva
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Weird

But in French, in Portuguese (my native), the same word to 'expensive' can be used as 'dear'

'My expensive friend" haha

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElenaLivia1
ElenaLivia1
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The same in Italian and Romanian. The same word means dear and also expensive. "Caro" in Italian and "scump" in Romanian. Interesting!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/derpkins
derpkins
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Kind of like the danish word "dyr", meaning expensive, but also animal

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JolieRoar
JolieRoar
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Why is it 'dure' instead of 'duur'? Is there a difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eleadorea

Yes and no ! Some adjective take "e" at the end depending on the noun following being "het" or "de" word + definite/indefinite article. But the meaning of the adjective stays the same.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fizahardy
fizahardy
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I answered "it is an expensive tea" but not accepted. Why is there no 'an' before the expensive? For me it feels strange without the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I think, as with a lot of English, the rules on inclusion or exclusion of an article match up pretty closely.

'It is an expensive tea.' - Focuses on the fact it's the particular brand (say, Twinings) or type (Green Tea) that's expensive.

'It is expensive tea.' - No sense of the brand or type, just some quantity of tea is dear.

Not really anything to do with anything but in Wales you can say 'It's expensive, tea.'. Which refers to tea as a concept and puts the emphasis on it being dear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DougNL

Not really. If you asked the question "How much is that tea?" and you received the answer "€50 per 500g packet" you would be justified in saying "It is expensive tea."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pebag

Sure, yet, without context this sentence makes no sense. In the context You described, both "It is expensive tea." and "It is an expensive tea." could be used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_rxlinguist
_rxlinguist
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Im familiar with using the word "dear" as meaning expensive and pronounced more like "dare". However, one would say "the tea is dear" rather than the "it is a dear tea".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DougNL

I agree, however I am originally from the UK and I would have said "The tea is expensive," rather than "The tea is dear" However, both would be acceptable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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You could be affirming another person's statement. In my accent and any others I've heard there's no difference in pronunciation between the two senses of dear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eleadorea

Hi ! Why is "This is expensive tea" a wrong answer ? Is the difference between "It" and "This" definite/indefinite article ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eleadorea

Thank you very much !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dunapartyboy

Still tryna figure out the context in which I would actually say this....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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What do you mean exactly? Just that you don't drink tea?

3 years ago
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