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  5. "Ellos derrotan a sus enemigo…

"Ellos derrotan a sus enemigos."

Translation:They defeat their enemies.

August 18, 2013

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonissimo

Even enemies get the personal "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BirdieWolf

y bebieron su sangre!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Owen5076

¿Pero por qué?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gernt
  • 2114

Oh deah, "They vanquished their enemies" was not accepted. I'll gripe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

I always like the extravagent ways that people come up with of translating the sentences!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfalfa2

"They defeated their enemies." wasn't accepted either. I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carnivorous_hart

i think (someone correct me if i'm wrong) but it doesn't accept "they defeated their enemies" because that would be past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfalfa2

You're right. I realized that after I submitted "defeated."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UndJon

How about They defeat (are defeating) their enemies? Present tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UndJon

Neither "Destroy", although I suppose one could defeat one's enemies without destroying them. May require the white flag.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

They vanquish is still not accepted as of June 2018.

derrotar (vencer) = defeat; vanquish; beat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charlie_Treuse

would you still put the "a" in the sentence if said enemies were, for example, wild animals instead of domesticated animals or people?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

This practice varies. Some of us were taught to speak a certain way, which agrees with the written rules. The rule is that people get it, and animals you love or other things you love and tend to personify (like your country sometimes) get the personal a. However, in practice, some people throw the personal a around a lot more in cases that don't follow the rule.

It's a matter of preference to some, it seems. You now know (my English paraphrased version from memory of) the rule on paper. The question is, how much of language is rules, and how much is just use (as long as the speaker and listener both understand each other)?

My opinion is that rules matter because they help preserve language enough for us all to understand each other, but the language exists for the people to communicate, not to limit them with arbitrary rules. In the case of the personal a, neither way will prevent the message from being understood. I'll use it the way I was taught, because that's how it is familiar to me. Also, speaking according to the rules helps people who aren't as familiar with the language. It's hard enough understanding a foreign language when spoken according to rules. Maybe I'm more careful because I've had to work around people who weren't very familiar with either Spanish, English, or both in some cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rickydito

DaBibliophile: Duolingo uses the personal "a" for animals and all persons. I do not think it is correct, but they do it so we have to live with it if we are using Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisagnipura

DaBibliophile: I agree with [deactivated user]. It is not correct, but it appears that Duolingo requires the use of the personal "a" with all people and animals.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattoleriver

Duo won't accept foes for enemies---too bad, fewer keystrokes. 09/02/2015


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/curlyeric

Is there any reason why sus can't mean his here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuevesHuevos

If there is no additional context, especially in Duo, it's safe to assume that if they use a possessive adjective "su" or "sus" - it will usually belong to whoever was already mentioned in the sentence.

Since they used "ellos", "sus" is probably referring back to "them/theirs"

If they wanted this one to be "his" it would probably be phrased: Ellos derrotan a los enemigos de él.

That being said, your answer is technically correct too since "su" can mean his/hers/its/theirs. Report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apbeaulne

I entered "your" and it was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulineAnn

Is "They beat their enemies."acceptable as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirima

I made a mistake, and they gave 'beat' as a valid solution


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessbee

Yes, "beat" was what I chose to use, just to see if DL would accept, and because it's more casual to my ears, and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

Maybe, but I doubt it. I think the computer will see beat and see strike, hit, or beat eggs, and that is a different verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

No, each sentence and its every translation is hand-entered by the course contributors, no machine input involved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

I think the fact that you said, "their enemies" versus the enemies gives further clarification as to why we use the personal "a".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zyriel

"...verlos conducido delante de ti, y escuchar el lamento de sus mujeres"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/volfkhat03

A-migo = Friend. Ene-migo = Enemy. nice :]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deborah355655

The turtle sounded like "ellas" rather than "ellos"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alec851453

The slow audio clearly says ellas but DL grades it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeadowlarkJ

My spellcheck changed my answer to "Ellos deer rotten a sus amigos."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RadioChris

They defeat their enemies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisagnipura

Hola radiochris: Yes, that is correct. Just curious. Why did you post it here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

Probably because there is no translation at the top of the screen...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S0R0USH

I don know when you posted this comment, but it still hasnt been fixed!

June 24, 2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malkeynz

There's one now (19 Jan 2015).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AshleyBlackwood

why isn't their a DO pronoun --los derrotan a sue enemigos?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

The direct object pronouns usually replace the direct object, while the indirect object pronouns are (in most sentence constructions) required, regardless of whether the indirect object is actually stayed. In other words, if they state what the direct object is, you don't need the pronoun. Indirect objects are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamelaDurk

they overcome their enemies. not accepted 05-15-15


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asandogeya

Why can't it be they defeat his enemies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alejandrocarmo

I cannot know what enemies.

They defeat their enemies. (de ellas/ ellos). They defeat his enemies. (de él). They defeat her enemies. (de ella). ___ They defeat your enemies. (de usted/ ustedes).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alejandrocarmo

I cannot know what enemies.

They defeat their enemies. (de ellas/ ellos). They defeat his enemies. (de él). They defeat her enemies. (de ella). ___ They defeat your enemies. (de usted/ ustedes).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hunter52981

My answer "They defeated their enemies" was considered incorrect. It should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claire277

It is incorrect because it is past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pato_Tonto

"They'll bend the knee or I'll destroy them."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieChen2

I was wondering if derrotar is a reflexive verb... When I used Spanishdict.com, the conjugation was given as "me derroto", is "me" necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martind611973

Quite right shoes. Beat your freinds, defeat your enemies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord-Bird

Does derrotar mean beating physically or in a contest?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martha845255

Derrota is it beating o defeating someone ayuda me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluePhoenix27

It...is...done...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mactuary1

What about in the Terminator scenario where the enemies are machines, is "Ellos derrotan sus enemigos." (without the "a") correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulSantuc

In English, beating in context such ad this sentence is the same as defeating


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shannon363335

Is it normal not to pronounce the "s" in ellos before a "d"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolters93

They definitely say "Ellas derrotan a sus enemigos" in the slow version and "Ello derrotan a sus enemigos" in the normal version


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diane72505

I used "conquer" and Duo rejected it, but I reported it. I think it has the equivalent meaning in English.


[deactivated user]

    If you kill your enemies, they win


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stph
    • 329

    Watch out: la tortuga azul def says 'ellas'!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoriettaPurpura

    anybody put they defeat their electricity?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarryYoung3

    Anybody else have trouble hearing whether it was ellos or ellas?

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