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European / American Spanish Newbie Question

I have been following the duolingo French and I am hooked enough to plan my next project. I thought maybe Spanish though I don't currently speak a word.

Being based in the UK I am only ever likely to visit Spain not the Americas. I read that the Duolingo Spanish course is Latin American rather than European. I know that one can easily understand the other, but would it be weird/hilarious for a Spaniard to hear an Englishman with a Latin accent?

Should this be something I consider before I start or does it just not matter?

3
3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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As an American who uses European Spanish... don't worry about it. =) The differences aren't that big, and you'll need to use other resources to work on your ear anyway. Supplement with television and radio from Spain and you'll be fine.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valentina_xx

It's not weird. I'm from Chile and I can say we perfectly understand Spanish people, and vice versa. And we are used to the accent of each other's. It's like UK English and American English. Also, there's a lot of Latin Americans in Spain (a friend of my dad is there), and Spanish in LA, so its normal. I think Duolingo uses Latin American Spanish bc has more speakers and I think its more easier but that can be completly wrong, because I'm from LA lol

Good luck learning Spanish!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M4rt4a
M4rt4a
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I am watching Spanish series right now and I have no problem with understanding what they are saying (after finishing duolingo course). And well, there were a few different words I had to pick up but nothing that would make it difficult. ;)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deguo
deguo
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The differences aren't anything to be overly concerned about. The main differences are the vosotros conjugation and lisp in European Spanish, but a speaker of one form can understand a speaker of the other without trouble.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrookeLorren
BrookeLorren
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I'm sure that there are English people all over the place that have learned Latin American Spanish.

You might want to try out Notes In Spanish when you get farther into the language. They use Spain's form of Spanish, so it would be a way for you to hear the differences. Although my main focus has always been Latin American Spanish, I listen to it just fine. I'm on the advanced podcasts now.

Just a little review of Spain Spanish is enough to pick up the differences. I wish that I had known that before I visited Spain years ago. I remembering asking very simple questions, and they looked at me like I had two heads. It wasn't until I was at the airport, asking "Donde es Juarez?" that I realized my mistake. They have a different accent when you make s and z sounds.

So I would recommend listening to some Notes in Spanish or other Spain Spanish before you actually go, but the differences are small enough that you only need a little review. Coffee Break Spanish, I believe, also uses Spain's Spanish.

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Reply3 years ago