https://www.duolingo.com/PonyH.

Help with webcomic

PonyH.
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The first sentence in this webcomic is ¿Que qué tal el día? http://ehtio.es/comic_es/emo/1135/la-rutina-de-genara/

I found out, that ¿Qué tal el día? means How's your day?, but what is with the first que? Does it change the translation much?

Oh, and if you have any spanish webcomic recommendations, I am happy to hear them. Especially non-story ones, so I do not need to understand everything... ;-)

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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@AnaLago5posted a response on my profile, which confirmed my answer.

AnaLago5: Que qué? Is a colloquial way to say qué dices? O qué me estás diciendo? It is frequently heard in Spain although I do not know if it is used in other Latinamerican countries.

AnaLago5: It shows amazement or surprise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bax_je
bax_je
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¿Que qué? is usually a way of saying ''what?! What do you mean?!'' when you can't understand or believe what you just heard.

In the context of the comic, that ''que'' at the beginning of the phrase gives the idea that someone wants to know how's her day, as if they asked her a question about how is her day going, and she's saying something like ''so you're asking me how's my day?...''

I find it it difficult to explain this use of ''que'' to English speakers but I'll try to use an example. When you ask someone ''¿Qué dijiste?'' an answer could be ''dije que...'' (I said that...) And I think that's where using ''que qué'' comes from, it's like a short way of saying ''you said that.... what?!''

Now let's imagine that someone says ''dije que quiero saber como va tu día'' In English: I said that I want to know how's your day. Then someone answers ''(dijiste) que (quieres saber) cómo va mi día?'' In English: (you said) that (you want to know) how my day is going? Then we shorten the phrase to just ''that how my day is going?'' and that's why it would seem like someone asked a question. I know it doesn't make sense English but in Spanish it does.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulaha88

What a great reply!! You explained it VERY clearly. Thank you for taking the time to help. +V+Lx3

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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Your explanation definitely helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PonyH.
PonyH.
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Thank you so much!! You explained very well indeed!

I had the idea, that it might be something like Well,... or So,... (And I think in my head I will treat it like that), but did not find anything like that. Now I know where it comes from!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letra_a
letra_a
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In that context the speaker wants to emphatize, or even he/she is asking for a second time the same question: I have just asked you about your day... As if He/she has not well heard the first time. I will have a look at the comic...

Ok, another situation is the one on the comic: the character is somehow answering a question someone has made, but not showed to us (I think the subject is the guy on the last picture, amazed by the weird bus the girl is taking). As if she was too asleep when she heard the question the first time....so, after waking up she says: what (were you asking me)? How is my day?... Something of the kind.... These are colloquial structures, they are difficult to translate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I think it might be slang or colloquial. This is the first time I've come across "Que qué" It would help if I could find out what country the author is from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulaha88

On a related note. One of Jaime Camil's (comedy actor) signature lines is "Que que WHAT?" with a look of astonishment. It would be comparable to, "Wh.. wh.. WHAT???" (It's funnier when he says it.)

3 years ago
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