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  5. "C'è parecchio da fare."

"C'è parecchio da fare."

Translation:There is a lot to do.

February 24, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walkergill

why is "there is quite a lot to do" wrong? "Quite a lot" is an alternative translation of parecchio isn't it?

February 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

report it

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catia9

Still getting it wrong. Grrr.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/majclw

I translated this as "there is much to do" but Duo is more literal again.

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

"There's plenty to do"--not accepted either.

September 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/njm37
  • 1088

Why is it "da fare"?

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daphnerose

'There is much to do' should be accepted surely?

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wilson.lindab

I always thought of parecchio as meaning "a fair amount". I also like "quite a lot". In any case, it definitely has a different connotation than simply "a lot"

December 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Genobambin

Are you freaking kidding me there is much to do and there is lots to do or the same damn thing

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donnast

I put "There is much to do". and it got marked wrong.

January 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthPalm

Is there a difference between "molto" and "parecchio"? I've been using molto for "very" and "a lot" and parecchio for "quite a lot" and that translation always seems accepted. I just want to know if they are interchangeable or there is something else.

May 12, 2018
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