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https://www.duolingo.com/IdanAlbilia

Is it me or that the "idioms" in Spanish is the hardest thing in the language?

when should i start learning it? im already in level 16 and i really dont understand any of it.. thank you

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zaqsert
zaqsert
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The Idioms bonus skill is very hard—and not very practical. I would save it for the end of the tree. ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vcel10
vcel10
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I often come across Spanish idioms in books for children, YA books, and spanish newspapers. I'll give you a quick example.

> La bella Zoe Saldaña reapareció en público luego de dar a luz a sus mellizos en la gala de entrega de premios de los Oscar 2015.

Every once in a while I come across an expression that baffles me. How do you give a light? After occasionally seeing that expression often and doing some quick research I realized that is a very poetic way of stating some one gave birth. BTW, you should start yesterday. The idioms are not hardest the thing, it's just a matter of seeing/hearing or reading the often used expressions as often as possible.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iscesargt

@vcel10. Excelente explicación, un ejemplo sencillo y muy fácil de entender para alguien que esté aprendiendo Español. If someone has a doubt with the Idioms, you can write me whenever you want. I am from Mexico and I would like to help you. Regards.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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I would like to see them change the idioms title to proverbs. It would be more understandable, and true to what they are. Those almost never translate word for word, so you can let go of trying to make sense of them that way.

I'd like to also have a skill that focuses on idiomatic phrases, like "piece of cake" for something that is very easy, dar la luz (as in vcel10's post) for give birth, (by the way, if you look this up in a dictionary, that is what it gives as a translation)., that was no picnic for something that was difficult, on the house for we're giving it to you, etc. We use phrases like these all the time, without thinking about how baffling they are to second language learners. The Dutch tree does include things like these from time to time. (see, there's another one) In Spanish, it's de vez en cuando, which translates to from time to when in English if you go word for word. Wouldn't have a clue unless I'd seen it in context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

My mother and I once spent an entertaining (though not very productive) hour trying to explain the phrase "off the wall" to a group of Japanese businesspeople. So I'm very aware of my idiomatic phrases whenever I talk to a non-native English-speaker!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

I think that Duolingo introduces the idioms lesson way too early in the tree, before you have the grammar or vocabulary to understand any of it. So you're forced to learn the sentences by rote, which at least for me doesn't work that well. I recommend to anyone who asks that they leave it until they've finished the entire tree.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielleRoccia
DanielleRoccia
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What do you mean exactly?

3 years ago