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  5. "He still does not look old."

"He still does not look old."

Translation:Han ser fortfarande inte gammal ut.

February 24, 2015

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reid_FL

I don't understand the usage of "ut", what's it's purpose here because I feel I could understand this sentence without the "ut"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

se on its own just means see. se ut is a particle verb, ut must be stressed, and together it means 'look' like in 'what you look like'. Unfortunately the verb and its particle are easily parted, like here, adverbs generally go between them, so it's easy to miss that this is one verb consisting of two words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nasser677522

Is "gammal" an adverb or an adjective? I thought it should be "gammalt".. Do both work here the adjective and the adverb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It's an adjective. The adverb would be gammalt, but you can only use the adjective here. To be more specific, it's a predicative expression. you can read more about the category here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predicative_expression


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pekarekr

Here is another source for information about predicate adjectives, which includes this list "of verbs that act as linking verbs only when followed by an adjective. When followed by a noun, these verbs are action verbs."

feel

look

smell

grow

taste

appear

prove

remain

turn

https://writingexplained.org/grammar-dictionary/predicate-adjective


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomMCauser

Is there any situation in which 'ut' wouldn't go to the end of the clause like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

If it's followed by a clause: Han ser ut att vara glad 'He looks like he's happy'. Clauses never go between ser and ut. But adverbs always do, so 'He looks happy' is Han ser glad ut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mokvinna

Where does ut go in: he still looks like his grandfather? I understand that the adverb has to go after the verb, but I am uncertain about "his grandfather". Is "his grandfather" a predicative nominal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reid_FL

Thanks! This clears a lot up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synthpopalooza

I have just trained myself to mentally say it the way Swedes say it ... hon ser vackra ut ... "she sees beautiful out" ... hon see ut som mig ... "she sees out like me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

It's hon ser vacker ut but ni ser vackra ut and huset ser vackert ut – the adjective changes for gender and number. And hon ser ut som mig (or … som jag).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synthpopalooza

Yep, it's this danged autocorrect on the mac here at work. Det talar inte svenska. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

English autocorrect can wreak havoc on Swedish texts. I remember the first time I got every i in a text corrected to I. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevinlinton_

If you guys want a direct translation I believe it is: He looks (ut at the end is connected to the ser to mean looks like) still not old.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

is "fortfarande" the same as putting "än" at the end of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui

No, "Han ser inte gammal ut än" would mean "He does not yet look old".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErixTheRed

It as actually pretty common in the Midwest USA to use "yet" instead of "still". I'm not suggesting it's acceptable, just pointing out where some of the confusion may lie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

Oh, thanks. I think duolingo accepted that version (with än at the end instead of fortfarande) as a correct answer when I wrote it. Someone should change that so that it's incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

and also, is the word order still correct and meaning the same if you write "Han ser inte fortfarande gammal ut"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anrui

No, unfortunately this word order wouldn't work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

Thank you for the reply, is there perhaps a rule as to which word order words have to be in? Similar to how the verb is usually on the 2nd place in the sentence, are there rules where "inte" is placed, as opposed to the adverbs/adjectives/prepositions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

There are rules, but they are pretty complex. Here's a good page that explains it, unfortunately only in Swedish. http://www.student.umu.se/under-studietiden/studieverkstad/skriftliga-uppgifter/skrivrad-och-sprakhjalp/ordfoljd-i-huvudsatser-och-bisatser/#


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

Thanks. If I managed to learn German adjective declination (http://cs617328.vk.me/v617328457/5cc4/F6VXY5Vsb90.jpg) I think I can learn anything XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

I'm sure you can learn it, I think it's probably easier to learn than to explain! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/obitonye

Why not "verkar ut"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnauti

Late answer, but ser ut is a particle verb but verkar is not. Basically you just have to learn which verbs are particle verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vilinthril

Okay, but why not “verkar”? As I understood it, “verkar” ~ German “wirken”, so that should be fine here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Augustovj

I don't understand why the "ut" must be so far away in this case. Can't I say Han ser inte ut gammal fortfarande or any other position for the "ut" in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagpieMaggie

What's the difference between "fortfarande" and "ändå"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CadklZ

Oh god, this is a terrifying sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonnaSchob

is "ännu" equivalent to "ändå" in this usage?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vilinthril

Why not “verkar”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JYH6UtXB

Could 'ser ut' be understood to loosely mean in English 'appears outwardly' (as in the common phrase 'outward appearance')?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikyNik1856

Since "Ser ut som" = "To look like" shouldn't be "Ser ut [something]" = "To look [something]"? If this is the case i should translate "He looks old" as "Han ser ut gammal"

Or, maybe, "ser ut som" is just a set expression to say "to look like" and i should use the following structure "Ser [something] ut" for all the other cases, translating the sentence "He looks old" ad "Han ser gammal ut".

Could someone save me from my cluelessness?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean933371

Would "Han ser än inte gammal ut" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MTAliz

I know 2D still doesn't look old!

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