Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Téann siad idir Baile Átha Cliath agus Corcaigh."

Translation:They go between Dublin and Cork.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KittDunne
KittDunne
  • 23
  • 6
  • 2
  • 528

So idir doesn't affect the initial consonant?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1483

Idir lenites when it means “both”, but it doesn’t lenite when it means “between” or “among(st)”.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittDunne
KittDunne
  • 23
  • 6
  • 2
  • 528

I wasn't aware that it meant 'both' ! What a fine distinction, I guess with a focus on sharing as opposed to distance.... Thanks !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danoconnell55
danoconnell55
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

How come "They go to both Dublin and Cork" is wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
  • 23
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6

No lenition

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Because idir means between.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnfm8
johnfm8
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

In English, the word between has two meanings in the context of motion. If I go between Dublin and Cork, it might mean I go to neither of these cities, but I pass through an intermediate point between the two. However, it could also mean that I go (most commonly back and forth) between Cork and Dublin along the path between the two cities. Which meaning does the Irish convey? I would think the former is more likely, because that seems less idiomatic in English than the latter, but I'm just wondering.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1483

Idir can convey either meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jessgraves1983
jessgraves1983
  • 18
  • 16
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5

Am I misunderstanding the notes at the beginning stating that "idir...agus" can mean "both...and"? May I have an example of phrases that might demonstrate the difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
  • 23
  • 11
  • 10
  • 6
  • 6

There was actually one sample question of "both ... and" with the cat liking both girls and boys. The way to distinguish is lenition, as explained in the Tips & Notes section.

So in this sense Galaxy's response above would have been slightly too short.

3 years ago