"Él consiguió pan."

Translation:He got bread.

August 20, 2013

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bgcervantes

I agree, PaulNomad, that "get" is overused in English. Here is a good example from a book from the 1930s.

"My dear, I thought I'd never get here! I got up at six this morning, and before I got dressed, John got a wire from his New York office telling him to get there as soon as he could. I got breakfast and got his bag packed and let the children get off to school as best they could. Meanwhile John got worried for fear he'd be late, so he tried to 'phone for a taxi. He got cross because he couldn't get the operator, but he finally did get her and got a taxi and got off all right. When he got to the station he 'phoned that he had got there just n time to get his train. Then I had to get all my work done before I could get away. As I said, I'm surprised that I got here at all!"

There are many substitutes for the "gets" and "gots".: obtain, procure, acquire, ascertain, learn, determine, induce, gain, win, achieve, earn, derive, attain, contract, take, capture, secure, receive...

I try to avoid the overuse of "get", yet it is one of those ways in which English is being simplified and transformed, sadly. Such rich language is being lost.

December 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malkeynz

I don't think it's much different than the vast variety of contexts "hacer" is used for in Spanish.

January 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YazykPineapple

I wouldn't say that English is becoming simplified. It is just become different, and sometimes that means that some parts become simpler and others become more complex.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kama410

Newspeek... If you have no word for it you cannot think it.

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel996280

El Hermano Mayor está mirando.

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Big Brother in Spanish still has to me El Hermano Mayor.

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel996280

Gracias por la correción. Mejoré la oración.

January 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joe814027

LAME. GET IS JUST FINE, SO GET OUT OF HERE WITH THAT

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Please don't shout in the forum

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jasonpenguin888

Would he gets bread work?

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

No. Consiguió is the preterite, it requires the past tense. The verb to get is somewhat weird in that we sometimes use the past tense got in a sort of present tense way (I got it can sometimes be sort of present tense), but using the present tense for the past tense doesn't work.

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

"I got it" is pretty much slang.

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The present tense meaning is somewhat slangy. Of course got as a past tense is standard. Got as a past participle varies a little. Americans tend to say gotten, but in the UK they tend to say got But get has so many different uses people often don't discern among them.

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stapmoshun

Haven't seen bread in a lesson for a long time lol

August 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

It rose for this occasion. Seriously, conseguir (according to New World dictionary) 1. to attain, achieve 2. to get, obtain 3. colloq. to find, locate. Sin contexto I think the best translation is He got bread. True, "He got bread" sounds like ebonics for: He has money. (present tense) But If you say: "What did Juan get at the store? He got bread and a bottle of milk." everything sounds fine.

April 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraQuinn23

"He got bread" is still the better translation, regardless of how it sounds. Using "found" in Spanish (encontrar) has a slightly different meaning.

April 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

However, DL is currently accepting He found bread for this translation. 25 agosto 2015, but in other sentences they reject that translation for this verb.

August 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babybrotherangel

when would obtener be used as opposed to conseguir.

December 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frenchyboy5

Why not "He acquired bread."?

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

If I heard someone say "I acquired bread" I would assume that there was something unusual about the process of aquisition. Acquire is mostly used to either refer to something that involves effort and time (He acquired wealth or he acquired an education) or something for which the process is unclear (He suddenly acquired a limp) But if someone came into the house with groceries and said "Let's make sandwiches. I (blank) bread" that blank would seldom if ever be filled by acquired or even obtained. If got were not the word used most probably the word used would not be a translation for conseguir. It would be bought or have. Elegant variation is all well and good but learning a foreign language requires knowing alot about the subleties of meaning and what would sound natural to a native speaker. The overused words in a language tend to maintain the more generic meanings.

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YazykPineapple

What is the difference between conseguir and obtener?

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

From the RAE: (Spanish Diccionario) http://dle.rae.es/?id=AOUKspW

conseguir 1. tr. Alcanzar, obtener o lograr lo que se pretende o desea. "To attain/reach, obtain, or achieve that which is intended or desired."

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FireCrescent

So is this why one could use conseguir in the context of winning something or "following" a path or individual to a destination?

January 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Although I think it is very important for students to begin to use fully Spanish dictionaries (and obviously the RAE is the best source) while you are still figuring out which English expressions to translate with a Spanish word à good dual language one is perhaps better. Spanishdict has quite a few of example sentences illustrating the various uses.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Conseguir

January 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greatlanguages

Please explain why you don't pronounce the "gu." I hear "concio (accent on "o")

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JR777300

With the letter combination of g - u, the u is pronounced softly and the g is basically nonexistent. It is the same with the word "siguio" (accent on the O). It sounds like see-yoh.

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bgcervantes

I would probably say: He got some bread. What did he buy when he went to the store? He got some bread. I am beginning to learn that we can't add any words to sound more natural.

November 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diazdiaz95

My family all speaks Spanish and I've asked several of them and they all use consegir/consiguio to mean "find/found" as well as "obtained" but most Spanish speakers I know use it to mean "find/found".

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

But see this.
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/conseguir
and this: http://dle.rae.es/?id=AOUKspW

I have some family members who misuse a few words-- they've been doing it all their lives.

March 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaloValiente

"Received" is a synonym of obtained/got (which are allowed here). I don't understand why "He received bread" would be considering incorrect.

June 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johchilds

Conseguir implies that the person obtained/got the item himself, for example if he went to store and bought it. It's more of an act or achievement. Receiving would mean getting it from someone else - it's more passive.

August 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johngt44

I think your premise is false ("received", though not a lot different is not a SYNONYM of "obtained" as I think any English speaker would agree) What is interesting is the false logic via the insidious use of "got" that has already been noted. "He received (got) the parcel" Fine, either word will do: 'received' = 'got'. Then: "She obtained (got) some bread" So 'obtained' = 'got'. Put both conclusions together and ergo: 'received' = 'obtained' NO! All because of the promiscuous little "got" meaning so many things.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JR777300

Exactly. Obtained can mean that you got it numerous different ways. Given to you, taken it, bought it, etc etc. Received means more that you were given or sent it.

Definitely not a synonym.

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanQ

Why couldn't I put "he had bread"?

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

To have bread is to possess it. This has become a meaning of the English word got. But this is not a meaning of conseguir. Conseguir means to get, and the past tense of get is got. As another clue, look at the sentence. It says consiguió which is the preterite. But the English use of got to mean have is only in the present tense. In the past tense got reverts to its original meaning of the past tense of get. You can say I got it to mean I have it, but never that you had it.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanQ

Thank you very mush! I've been learning English for more than ten years, yet I haven't notice this.

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I wouldn't feel bad. I think that there are some native speakers who wouldn't know why it is wrong even if they "knew" it. Despite the profound impact on the English language of the Norman Invasion of England way back in 1066, these words from Old English really form the backbone of Modern English. But they are the most "irregular" and have garnered the most meanings and uses over the years. I put irregular in quotes because old English had German like verb congugations, three genders and a complex case structure like German. Just out of curiousity, what is your native language?

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanQ

Taiwanese Chinese hahaha

January 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneThorli

He got bread! So did he buy it? Was it given to him? Did he find it? Did he win it? Why would I EVER need to use that sentence?

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Duo has come up with some pretty strange sentences, but this is actually a pretty normal sentence. I am as likely to say what I "got" from the store as what I "bought" from the store (although I do indeed buy it). And of course getting something from somewhere else (He got the bread from the bakery, He got the mail, the newspaper, the letter, etc. If you haven't said this sentence and many variations of it many times already, I would be surprised. But it is why I object to the more unusual translations like acquired. While one commonly gets items, ideas, licences, etc; one only acquires things like wealth and education.

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneThorli

Ah you sound American?

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Indeed I am. Perhaps we use get more often, but remember that Duo's is American as well. Only the languages like Welsh and Irish have any real British bend, which is natural.

June 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sully.su

So conseguir/lograr/ganar/obtener can all mean obtain/achieve/gain/win, are these all used interchangeably? Duo translated this sentence as "He found bread", can conseguir/encontrar also be used interchangeably?

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I don't know why Duo gave you He found bread. The official and best translation is he got bread. Obtener and conseguir are pretty synonymous. Duo tends to translate conseguir as to get and obtener as obtain. This seems problematic to me as obtain has differenciated itself from get in English to some degree. Lograr is to achieve and sometimes we might say to reach, but I don't think that a Spanish speaker would find it much of a synonym of alcanzar. Lograr is one of those verbs which has to be in the imperfect to have the expected meaning in the past. In the preterite it means more like managed to or was able to Ganar is either to win or to earn. Except for obtener and conseguir, I don't think a Spanish speaker would consider these words really interchangeable at all. I think you find some degree of similarity because of all the uses we have for the English verb to get. This is a word that comes from Old English and has picked up a lot of different meanings and uses along the way. I looked it up for some discussion recently and found about 30 or 40 meanings and uses. Quite a few for three little letters! Any word that is not a cognate, and indeed some cognates, don't share all the meanings of words that have so many meanings and uses in another language.

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaniceHar

So how would it be said if it were "I got it" and "You got it?"

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yo lo conseguí is I got it. Of course you got it has more options. Tú lo conseguiste, usted lo consiguió, or ustedes lo consiguieron) Or, of course you could run through the same ones with the verb obtener which is conjugated like Tener. (lo obtuve lo obtuviste etc)

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bigwig40

Could you not use "He fetched bread"?

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coconutPi

I thought that "obtener" is obtain

June 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Obtener and consiguir are pretty synonymous, really more so than get and obtain in English. Duo translates obtener as obtain because it is a cognate, but obtaining generally involved some process. You obtain a license or a degree, but you get the milk.

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/164609/obtener-vs-conseguir-both-mean-to-get

June 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filipinacionista

Can this also be used as a slang? You know...Gangster Spanish?

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I don't think so. Regional Spanish slang has many words for money, but I don't think pan is one. There are a few food items in the lot though., like harina, mango, anda papa. Here it is by country.

http://www.speakinglatino.com/speaking-latino-whats-the-word-money/

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dodo352562

We found bread in a hopeless place

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aju5

You know, there is somthing I don't understand why pan for bread?

November 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Asking why a word is that word is hard to answer. It is because it is. It comes from Latin. Bread is pain in French, panne in Italian,and pão in Portuguese. While they look different they are pronounced quite similarly

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rubescube

He got bread with his dinner. He got bread yesterday. He got bread all over the floor. They all make sense to me.

December 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Well the only one that is consistent with got as the past participle of the verb to get. He got bread when he was out.

December 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonHar3

It said that " He got his bread "was wrong.?

May 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

There is no modifier at all for bread. It's not his bread, the bread, some bread etc. It's just He got bread

May 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

The so-called correct translation of this as 'he bought bread is incorrect', this means to buy it, not to obtain it.

September 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The official correct translation of this sentence is he got bread, which is absolutely correct. But many native English speakers are really at least as likely to refer the the process of procuring bread at the store as getting as they are to say buying. That the process of getting the bread from the store to the house involves buying it is assumed. Obviously getting is still a broader term. You can get the bread from the pantry without buying it, so buying is not the most universal translation. But real translation does have to include the actual situational meaning. This one goes both ways linguistically, but some don't. You might say Yo desayuné a las seis or Yo comí el desayuno a las seis in Spanish. In English I breakfasted at six would be rare, I ate breakfast at six more common, but probably the most common would be I had breakfast at six. This is not a literal translation but it is a valid one.

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

True, but I neglected to say that my answer which was marked as incorrect was "He brought bread" meaning that he obtained and arrived with bread. In NZ many people confuse 'brought' and 'bought' (a particular bugbear of mine). I can accept that 'brought' may not be thought the equivalent of 'got', but, as the Spanish sentence does not mention the verb 'comprar', I cannot accept that 'bought' is correct in this case.

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myshka2001

Everything is in English, no Spanish words are written

December 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

A lot is indeed written in English. Some people aren't as interested in reading and writing as they are in speaking and listening. If you are using a computer the program does allow you to type all your answers instead of using the tiles. But if you are using the device apps just make sure that you have selected in options that you do want the listening exercises. Those always involve writing in Spanish from hearing the Spanish sentence. But as you advance through the course you will see a slow increase in written Spanish.

December 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myshka2001

Everything in English , no word in Spanish. It is impossible to do this lesson

December 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bfarguitar

Why cant it be "he acquired bread"?

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Actually I believe they used to accept that. If they changed it it was perhaps due to users like me who object to translations that use words that may mean the same thing but are never used in the specific context. I doubt I have ever heard He acquired bread spoken. I am actually not a person who often talks about something never being said. I know in the appropriate situation a lot of strange sentences sound perfectly natural. But if someone said he acquired bread, I would assume they were talking about something happening that was much more complex than "getting" bread from either the pantry or the store. While this isn't a set expression, it certainly is one you might hear every day in Spanish. So using a word in the English translation which one would definitely not hear every day is not the best translation. I am not really sure when you would want to use acquire, so I am not sure, but it is possible under those circumstances consiguir would be the preferred translation, but I suspect adquierer might be better.

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanPlatino

This is from the verb 'Conseguir' which basically means 'To Get' or 'To obtain'. The past tense is used here. I got bread = Yo conseguí You got bread = Tú conseguiste He got bread = Él consiguió She got bread = Ella consiguió

February 23, 2019
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