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"His boss allowed it."

Translation:Lo permitió su jefa.

3 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eldonkatz

Why not dejó?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patoquac
patoquac
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To use the verb "dejar" with this meaning you need a subject giving the permit or the ability to perform an action and a receiver (grammatically the indirect object) getting the permit or ability to perform that action. Here it doesn't work: "his boss allowed it" (allowed the purchase, for example) doesn't have any receiver of the permit.

You can use "dejar" in sentences such as "su jefa le dejó/permitió irse a casa" (his boss allowed him to go home), "el ruido de la calle no me deja/permite dormir" (the street noise doesn't let me sleep) or "su madre no le deja/permite comer caramelos" (her mother doesn't allow her to eat candy).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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When using "permitir" the person being granted permission can only be an indirect object.

  • Su jefe lo permitió = His boss allowed it.
  • Su jefe le permitió irse temprano = His boss allowed him to leave early.

With dejar the person getting permission can be a direct or indirect object.

  • Su jefe lo/le dejó = His boss allowed him.
  • Su jefe lo/le dejó irse temprano = His boss allowed him to leave early.

Since "dejar" (with the meaning of 'to allow') is considered by RAE's dictionary to be transitive, the most common usage is with direct object pronouns.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuaisaac

Can someone explain the logic of "lo permitió su jefe"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianauna
adrianauna
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I cant. It doesnt sound right to me. Wouldnt this translate to 'he permitted his/her/your boss"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, in that case you'd include the personal a and normally leave out the lo.

  • Lo permitió su jefe. - His boss allowed it.
  • Permitió a su jefe. - He allowed his boss. Whatever that's supposed to mean. :)
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy

Also, "Su jefe lo permitió" is a viable answer.

RyagonIV, how did you insert bullet points?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The Duolingo comment section works with the Markdown language.

For bullet points, you just start a line with a - (dash) or * (asterisk), follwed by a space. At the end of the line you have to make two spaces and then a line break (enter) to start a new line directly under it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy

Thank you! Very helpful.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LandonThom
LandonThom
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I think of it like "he allowed it, his boss". Su jefe just clarifies who allowed it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You can put the subject after the verb for purposes of emphasis. It's more along the lines of "It was his boss who allowed it."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James_Priester

Why cant you use "permitiólo"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patoquac
patoquac
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You would be understood but it would sound strange to a native speaker. For some reason attached pronouns don't work with all verb tenses. They work with the infinitive (permitirlo), the gerund (permitiéndolo) and the imperative (permítelo/permítalo/permitámoslo/permitidlo/permítanlo)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James_Priester

Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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That could work if you're travelling to Andalusia

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niccnac

How do I know, that this does require the indirect lo? While the question ?Quien permitio eso? does work with eso instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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Actually, "lo" [masc.] and "la" [fem.] are used with direct objects, whereas "le" is for the indirect objects. All can be used when referring to "it".

"Quien permitió eso?" would rather be "Who allowed that?". See more below, comparing "it", "this" and "that".

• Masculine, Feminine | neuter = in english:

  • Lo, La | le = it ... [+him/her/ formal you (usted)]
  • Este, Esta | esto = this ... [close to the speaker]
  • Ese, Esa | eso = that ... [farther from the speaker, closer to the listener]
  • Aquel, Aquella | aqoello = that (over there) ... [farther away from them both, speaker and listener]
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giddyup509

Which part tells me the subject is male...how do I know that it is not Her boss?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cringy

It could be her boss, Spanish possessives don't distinguish on gender. If you need to make it clear I think you can say "el jefe de él" instead of "su jefe".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

It could also be "Your [formal] boss"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/giddyup509

thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cringy

De nada

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrick.r.10

Why not "Su jefe se lo permitío"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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It would be reflexive then: "His boss allowed it to himself [se]". Like for example your friend's (his/her) boss allowed something to himself, but not to other employees.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/senathesquid

I tried to say "Su jefa lo permitió" and it got angry. Is there a reason why?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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[ 12/29/2016 ] I just wrote: "Su jefe lo permitió."; which was accepted, so I should think your answer is also considered as correct by now. If not, it should be reported.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoVasquez5

is 'su jefe permitio eso ' wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
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'eso' means 'that', so yes, it would be a wrong answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chymosine

"Su jefe lo permitió" was allowed but I don't know what the most natural Spanish order would be. Is Duo usually right on the word order?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The standard subject-verb order is what you'd usually use, but Spanish is a bit more flexible than English in that regard.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeLanzarote

Could someone answer this please who has a good knowledge of Spanish, about how often do native Spanish speakers say things that are all jumbled up and confuse us trying to learn it?, because for me it becomes a real problem and just doesn't make sense, it kinda turns my brain to mush, another question I have is, is there anyway to help get rid of this sense of confusion, something that can make me understand it better if it's back to front? Si tan- gracias por tu ayuda...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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What do you want to know? Why the Spanish sentence is "backwards"?

It has to do with emphasis, but first you need to know an important rule: Object pronouns (things like me, te, lo, la, se and so on) most often come before the conjugated verb. The most neutral word order here would be "Su jefe lo permitió."

But alternatively you can place the subject - su jefe - behind the verb for extra emphasis, or for making it answer a different question.

  • Su jefe lo permitió. - What did her boss do? / Who allowed it?
  • Lo permitió su jefe. - What did her boss allow?

You can do this in Spanish much more than in English - put the emphasis of the sentence in the front, then the verb, then the subject.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stepheneagle

Why not a su jefe? Why does "a" not apply here?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The personal a is only added to a direct object. The boss here is the subject, doing the thing.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Espanolisto

Por que no "lo su jeffa permitió"? It seems to me that usually Spanish follows a form that's more "it, his boss allowed" eg "ella me llamo" for "she called me"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Just as with "Ella me llamó", in "Su jefa lo permitió" the object pronoun (me and lo, respectively) needs to appear right in front of the conjugated verb. So the form is more around "His boss it-allowed" and "She me-called".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201

I'm struggling to understand why "jefe" isn't the subject. Can someone please enlighten me? In English, the best sentences are in Active Voice rather than passive, as this one is. According to the word-by-word translation, the sentence should read, "It was allowed by his boss." How did it turn into active voice?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Su jefe" is the subject in this sentence. In Spanish you have the ability to place the subject behind the verb if you want to shift the emphasis of the sentence a bit. (Here it's on the object lo, as in "This was allowed, against all odds.")

English has lost its ability to shift around various parts of the sentences because it doesn't mark subject or objects and has next to no conjugation left, but I'm pretty sure it could do the same once upon a time. Every other major Germanic language still can.

Anyway, true passive in Spanish would look like "Fue permitido por su jefe". A form of ser, then the participio of the verb, and por to identify the person doing the action. It's not used very often.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevenTinc

What's with the obsession with female bosses? The "normal" form I learned is jefe which your system accepts and is in the comments below.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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If the masculine form is allowed as well, what's your problem?

2 months ago