"Yo voy a utilizar el coche."

Translation:I am going to use the car.

August 20, 2013

99 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brbert02

Would it be common to hear this sentence in Spanish? seems odd in English.

August 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

you might hear usar instead of utilizar

August 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I am also curious about relative frequency of use. When Spanish verbs are cognates of the English I tend to imbue them with the same connotations as the English and I know that can be way off. When someone uses utilize instead of use it sounds pretentious. To my mind utilize means to use a resource to its best advantage. So if I use a van I just drive it. But I might utilize the van to take 6 people home. It certainly isn't a hard and fast rule but it is common. Is there any difference in usage between usar and utilizar?

December 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DroppedBass

"usar" is only used when you perform the action the object was intended for, while "utilizar" can be used for any action you perform with the object.

November 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

In my opinion, the translation of the Spanish sentence into English (the one at the top of this page) should be, "I am going to use the car" with "utilize" as an accepted variant.

November 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annwitbrock

So, opposite to the words' use in English?

June 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

No, the same. We never would say we are "utilizing' a car to go somewhere...

November 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukecomer

Thanks

August 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filiper2

I do not know anyone that uses utilize in this manner. It is correct, but seldom used in everyday English. (Southern Ontario, Canada)

November 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/horvathdavid

Hey there; utilizar el choche is ok to use in Spanish. It is more interchangeable in Spanish than English. Don't compare too much because the way you say things in Spanish are different compared to English.

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelBell0

Maybe in south american but you wouldn't hear utilizar used for this in Spain any more than you would hear it in England, ie zilch.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

Voy a usar el coche in Ecuador..

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FcoJavier99

In Spanish is most common "voy a usar el coche", but "voy a utilizar el coche" is fine too.

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemonicAngel1602

I agree

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbigailCam239487

Spanish have a different way of saying things. In Spanish, this sounds completely natural and its what you would say in Spanish. But in English you just say use so it sounds more natural

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Exactly. But Duo could get around this issue by simply allowing and suggesting use as the translation for utilizar here instead of the cognate utilize. That is the essential meaning of this sentence. I am generally in favor of underlining the connection between cognates, but when it does not work well, they should just let it go. Of course they should always ACCEPT utilize, just not exclusively.

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joseterol1

We usually say in Spanish "voy a usar" more, but is not odd

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddy01

When must you use Yo rather than just the verb voy.

January 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adina_atl

You should only use Yo when you want to emphasize it. "Can I use the car today?" "No! I am going to use the car." I was told by a native Spanish speaker that I sounded oddly emphatic when using so many pronouns. Duolingo uses too many pronouns in its Spanish sentences and too few contractions in its English sentences. Both will mark you as a foreigner in casual speech.

August 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Adina, your points are precise and correct. However, I shall forever be a foreigner in everything beyond my native Am Eng and regional dialect. And I am comfortable in "not passing". Better to be a struggling and communicating foreigner than appearing a unschooled native. Indeed, I deliberately slow my speaking cadence and choose less nuanced vocabulary choices when speaking with "non-natives". I am sure you do likewise! Finally, isn't there an endearing charm when you hear someone "non-native" trying to talk with/to you in your mother tongue? Regards, Mark 16Dec17

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I don't disagree with you for the most part. But when you spoke about talking to foreign English speakers, it made me realize the special enjoyment I get recognizing the structures and such that are being incorrectly introduced from their language into English. This is especially true for languages I speak where I understand the structures. And, although I also know that I will never sound truly like a native speaker (especially since I am now 63), some of the work that goes into trying to sound like a native helps really get to the personality of the language. If you aren't looking to understand the personality of Spanish, you will always just have a lessor way to communicate with more people. But when you get to know the personality you will understand what Spanish or any other language can give you that English can't. If you can drive a Honda Civic you can probably drive a Ferrari, a Land Rover and a Minivan. But you can do different things with them, but you have to take advantage of each vehicles characteristics and drive them differently.

December 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heidi.dejo

I'm used to it, though.

June 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim294818

It amazes me that I have to scroll down this far to finally get the yo question.

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thefluent1

It seems that "voy a" means both "im going to" and "i will"... so there is no other common way of saying something like "i will do something" in spanish? Its only "voy a hacer algo" or "voy a hacer una cosa" right? No other way of translating "i will"?

July 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yerrick

No, Spanish does have a simple future tense, unlike English. Generally, it's formed it by adding the preterite suffix onto the infinitive: utilizar + é = utilizaré, "I will utilize".

July 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anneray347

I had a similar thought. It did not allow me to say 'i'm going to use'. 'I will use' seems to me to be the simple future tense mentioned in this thread. I might report it...

April 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

You should definitely report it. I thought that had been fixed. Duo has been very consistent about form for form and this one breaks their pattern. Maybe they only fixed it for utilize, which is almost worse. I know Duo likes to highlight the cognate at times but utilize is even more unusual and specialized than get/obtain. It would really only be used to indicate some unusual purpose of the car.

April 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenSank

Duo did not like "I go to use the car." why not?

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LavellWall1

Voy a means i'm going to.

November 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemonicAngel1602

Cause that does not really make sense.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natashareidnine

Because it doesn't make sense. "I am going to take the car," is what one would say.

November 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annwitbrock

In English we really would not normally say that, especially when there is a sense of future action (which "am going to" expresses). To use "go" in this way, English would be expecting some qualification or consequence, e.g. "... straight away, but it has gone". And it would likely be in a spoken narrative. Even then, we'd probably prefer "went".

June 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raguleader

Question: "coche" seems to be a cognate of the English word "coach", which, among other things, is a type of train car or wagon (as in a Stagecoach). Can "coche" be used similarly in Spanish?

March 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The short answer is yes, but there are other words for various meaning of the English word coach. The only meaning of coach that cannot be covered is the British/UK use for bus. A horse drawn coach can be called a coche de caballo, although there are several other terms and I don't think this is the most common. Coche is not the most common word for car in many areas. Carro and auto/automovíl are used in various places more commonly. I don't know if the use of the various words would have a parallel or inverse relationship.

March 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

Speaking of coche, other language programs use el carro, or camioneta, not sure of the spelling. I do notice DL always seems to use el coche. Is carro out of favour, or something?

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

I have wondered about that myself as I do believe carro is the most common word for car in Mexico which has normally seemed to be where they reference theiir Spanish American Spanish. I have included the Spanishdict translations that have some region and usage notes. The auto which I have also heard was marked S Cone or something like that and I have no idea what that means. Caminoneta is more like a van or.pickup, but can be used for station wagon on one end of the spectrum or bus on the other. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/car

I was just thinking yesterday that it would be nice to have a source that mapped some of this usage more extensively as somethings vary a lot. I am using a program that teaches various different languages but mostly vocabulary. (Its name is a phonetic play on the word Memorize but I can't remember the spelling variation) I am using the module that presents what they claim to be the most common 5000 words in Spanish. I like it because Duo does not teach a lot of vocabulary. One of its words was universario for university. I have never heard or seen that before and even my RAE dictionary doesn't have it. I assume it is used somewhere though.

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuntieJenny

Is that program called Memrise? I use Memrise daily along with Duolingo. Duolingo is my #1 course, and Memrise is #2, but I like both for different reasons. Memrise introduced reflexive pronouns early in the A1 Spanish course (me gusta, le gustan, etc.) and presented them in complete sentences; they seemed strange to me at first but after seeing them used there over and over and over again they appear more natural to me now.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

thanks for that reply, now that I think bout it, DL does offer el auto, as well as vehículo, unsure of where accent goes... but not carro. Nice website.

May 6, 2016

[deactivated user]

    When is it correct to use the hyphen over the 'u' in útilizar? My spelling was not right, but not right.

    May 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

    Never. Neither utilizar nor any of its conjugations has a ú. You are probably thinking of the word útil, which means useful. These marks are used either to differentiate between words spelled alike (i.e. el for the and él for he) or to place the stress on a different syllable than.would be normally stressed. Spanish has two standard stress structures. If the word endd in a vowel, an s or an n, the stress is placed on the penultimate (next to last) syllable. All other consonants place the stress on the last syllable. Obviously single syllable words don't need those rules. If a word accents a different syllable, an accent mark, or tilde, is required. NOTE the word tilde in English refers only to the ~ mark like in baño, but in Spanish it refers to both that mark and the accented vowels as in corazón.

    May 27, 2016

    [deactivated user]

      Thanks for this explanation. I understand what you are saying, but Duo Lingo may not understand it's own teaching because I have had on the lessons I am going back over spell" utilizar " with and without the hyphen over the -u. That's why I've asked those who have finished or may have a better mastery than me of Spanish !

      May 28, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baramander

      Why does DL use coche a instead of carro?

      March 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

      That is a good question. There are a very few exercises that show up with carro, auto, and automóvil, but certainly carro is the most standard in the countries where most of the other regional vocabulary is used.

      March 19, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sccarmack

      Could it also mean "I'm going to drive the car"? I mean what's another way of using a car if not driving? Lpl

      May 26, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

      You can stand on it to get a kitten out of a tree or store stuff in it to keep them dry or take a picture of the family leaning against it for your Christmas card. The point it really not what you think the sentence means to say, it is what it actually says. The fact that the way you use a car is mostly by driving it has to do with the nature of cars, not of language. Both in Spanish and in English you can phrase it either way. But to drive is not a valid meaning of utilizar. Manejar or conducir are verbs meaning to drive. This lessons are about vocabulary grammar and syntax. Alternative meanings are accepted based on being valid for the word,

      May 26, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tusy22

      Take here would work much better in English. If you take the car you will use it, utilize it anyway.

      August 6, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

      You are adding so much context that it is causing you to make assumptions. The word take is not a synonym for use or utilize, and it is possible to use a car without taking it anywhere. You might use it to sleep in, to store stuff while something is being done in the house or garage to sit on to watch a parade or to push something a few feet. Certainly these are not the most common situations, but I have done all of them at some point. Especially in a new language, thinking about what the words say is important. Except in cases of idioms or common social expressions which might translate quite differently, translation on Duo is about showing you understand the use of the words given.

      August 6, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BSmvRNLE

      Why is the "a" necessary?

      November 26, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

      Most verbs which are not modal do require some preposition before adding another verb in the infinitive. It can be one of several. Essentially some of these become set constructions. Examples include

      Terminar de (infinitive) to stop (gerund) Tengo que (infinitive) to have to (verb) Ir a (infinitive) to be going to (verb)

      November 26, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamarisHess

      Why does Douo use coche instead of carro? Before, I've always heard carro. It sounds more like car in English anyway. But i guess Douo dosn't talk English anyhow!

      August 22, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

      Duo traditionally used coche, so you will see it a lot. But they recently overhauled the Spanish course, adding over 20 units. They also seem to have updated some of their old vocabulary which wasn't as common in Latin America. Even though I am at level 25 in Spanish and have been on Duo for several years, they made me start from Crown Level 0 on all the newly added units. I have seen many new exercises with carro for car and even sándwich instead of emparedado, so I believe it is being corrected. You are correct that carro is much more common in Latin America. I would even say auto or automóvil is more common than coche, although much less common than carro. I believe coche is most common in Spain.

      August 22, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel180594

      Soanidh speakers say utilizar but English speakers would understand use better than utilize

      December 4, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andyjacobs10

      Who in the english speaking world wouls use utilize like this. Daft.

      February 14, 2019
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