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  5. "Der Partner isst sein Essen."

"Der Partner isst sein Essen."

Translation:The partner eats his food.

August 20, 2013

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

Hahahaha, I kept hearing "ist". The partner is his meal. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniamCast

Same here, it was really awkward. It's nice of duolingo to make us analyse these kind of situations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather281962

Haha same. You are what you eat I suppose. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbhishekAlfred

How do we differentiate between these two meanings: "The partner is eating his[own] food" and "The partner is eating his(his partner's) food"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/remus.petrescu

You could ask the same thing in english since you had to use brackets ... it's contextual


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarpentersKeys

Can I assume "his" refers to another? Would it be Der Partner isst er Essen if it referred to the partners own meal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Der Partner isst sein eigenes Essen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Korrigierte. Danke.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vensum

Why is it "sein"and not "seinen"? Partner is masculine right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hazman27

Essen is neuter i.e. das Essen, so sein takes the form it would for a neuter noun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waltrisc

Now it is clear! Akkusativ, "sein" is used in the Nominativ form because it is neuter noun.. With a masculin noun, like "reis", it woul be "Er isst seinen Reis". Correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Contrapunctus_

Can I infer from the word "sein" that the "partner" must be a male? Or it can be either a male or a female, but we just use "sein" because "Partner" is masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

One should indeed infer that the Partner is a man (or boy), just as you would if you heard the English sentence "the Partner eats his food."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex.schuch

German has, among other concepts, the concept of Genus (grammatical gender) and Sexus (biological gender). 'Der Partner isst sein Essen.' strictly speaking does not give any clue about the Sexus, so the partner can either be male or female. But in practice, it almost always refers to a male partner, as a female partner is called 'Partnerin', so for a female partner, the sentence is 'Die Partnerin isst ihr Essen.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanDimi

In another trivia, "essen" meant lunch, so I used lunch and it said it's not correct. Is it some condition that I'm missing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Essen means "food." Mittagessen means "lunch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allenfrang

It is clear that the German phrase is singular. But in English, using "their" for a gender-neutral singular possessive pronoun is a common practice. Just saying!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vikukunta

There is no difference between his and her in German, right? So, I could have given 'her meal" as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteamWing

Yes, there is.

"sein Essen" "ihr Essen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinHee

Is it wrong to say 'Der Partner isst ihn Essen'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuhammadRi811748

Ihn (him) is accusative form of er. Since it is "his food", it should be the possessive form thus sein is used instead


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nycc93

Would this sentence still hold if the partner was a female? I know the word "sein" is used since "Partner" is masculine, but I wonder if this would bet he same translation if the partner happened to be a female.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrej600333

Since "der Partner" is masculine would I refer to a female partner as "die Partnerin?"

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