"Raak je het warme bord niet aan?"

Translation:Are you not touching the warm plate?

3 years ago

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jpherold
jpheroldPlus
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Is there a conjugation rule, or grammar rule, that would be good to know, which explains why annraken was split up this way? I haven't come across this before

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Yes! aanraken is actually something called a separable verb. A separable verb is a verb that consists of a regular verb "stem" as well as a preposition attached to the front. In aanraken, aan is the separable prefix - the preposition - and raken is the verb it attaches to. The purpose of the preposition that attaches to it is essentially to change the meaning of the verb. When alone, raken is more like hit, but with the separable prefix added it means touch. These verbs are very common in both Dutch and German.

You'll notice that the verb is in its normal position with the preposition at the end of the sentence. This changes when the verb is in the infinitive form or when the verb has to go at the end of the clause. Here are some examples:

  • Raak je het warme bord aan? = Are you touching the warm plate?
  • Moet je het warme bord aanraken? = Do you have to touch the warm plate?
  • Je bent blij omdat je het warme bord aanraakt. = You are happy because you are touching the warm plate.

In the first example the prefix is separated and placed at the end of the sentence/clause because it is not in the infinitive form and the verb itself does not have to go at the end of the clause. In the other two examples, however, one of these two things occurs, so it is kept together.

Additionally, as Brijsven pointed out below, something interesting happens when there's a te + infinitive construction: te separates the prefix and the infinitive. Here is one of his examples:

  • Ze probeert het warme bord aan te raken. = She tries to touch the warm plate.

I see that you're a decent bit into the tree, seeing as how you posted your question a month ago, so it's likely you've found this out by now. However, I hope that someone who has yet to learn this will see this explanation and find it useful. ^_^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Very nice summary. It's worth noting that when te is present (e.g. te+infinitive constructions) -- the prefix and the infinitive are separated by the te:

  • Ze probeert het warme bord aan te raken. -- "She tries to touch the warm plate."

  • Klik hier om door te gaan. -- "Click here to continue."

  • Verboden aan te raken. -- "(Please) do not touch." -- Literally: forbidden/prohibited/banned to touch. [This example may be seen on a public sign]

Cheers! ^.^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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I forgot to mention that! Thank you very much for adding that. ^_^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Pleasure ^^ Feel free to take anything from my post and add it to yours -- as yours will certainly receive much more exposure ^.^

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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I'll certainly do that. :D Thanks again, I really appreciate it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BRyeO12
BRyeO12Plus
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We do that in English too, we just don't put the preposition at the front in the infinitive: stand up, run out, go on, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmyPhillips101

Thank you! It's my first time seeing this separable verb, and I was surprised I somehow managed to get my question right when I was so confused. This has helped me to understand, and I know where to look for more guidance now :) thanks again!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roferretti

I dont understand the te part. Where is the TE? Couldnt it be ze probeert het warme bord aanraken? Originally like this there is no TE. Unless you misstyped and meant the "t" only from probeert?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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It could be your sentence as well! However, te can be used with proberen. It's simply optional.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeGroteKaas

I can see myself using this sentence all the time :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Captain2448
Captain2448
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totaly confusing sentence..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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What do you find confusing about it? Perhaps I can explain. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DasEisbrecher
DasEisbrecher
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I think it is because you need to read the whole sentence before you can understand what it says? The fact that "niet" and "aan" are at the end of the sentence and, at the same time, are connected to the verb which is on the very begining make you read the phrase several times. I guess it'll take time until we get used to it ":)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benathong

If you once learn Japanese, it requires you to put verb to the very end of the sentence. Imagine too many people you need to mention...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carrotlinewhite

My main issue is that I have no clue what this sentence means! It feels very full of double negatives. I would understand "you do not touch the warm plate", but by switching the je and raak the UK sentence doesn't make sense to me? Any help?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacobergo

To be fair it is quite a tricky one to translate as it is a warning posed as a question. essentially what it means is Be careful not to touch the hot plate. The equivalent of saying it in English would probably a command ending in a question mark. "don't touch the hot plate?"

However this way of warning is not uncommon in Dutch. e.a. "Val je niet door het gat?", "Are you not falling through the hole?", Breek je de vaas niet?", "Are you not breaking the vase" Again in both cases it's a friendly warning.

The literal translations just do not work well in English as you can see. In all fairness, would you need to use it in day to day Dutch speaking? Probably not but be aware of the concept because you will probably hear it at some point.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beloeng
beloengPlus
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Could "hot plate" be an alternative English translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • Hot = heet
  • Warm = warm
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ginyah
Ginyah
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I thought "heet" was a verb meaning "is called".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Heten is the verb, and the conjugation of ik, jij, hij/zij/het is indeed heet. But words often have multiple meanings depending on how they are used.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beloeng
beloengPlus
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Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silverthornfire
silverthornfirePlus
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The sentence would make a lot more sense if that were the case. Another example is the dutch for hot chocolate which is always written as warme chocolate (esp in canteen self service machines).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beloeng
beloengPlus
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Actually I still don't get the difference between "hot plate" and "warm plate". Help? :) Thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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warm means 'at a comfortably high temperature', so you can still touch it without getting burnt.

hot, on the other hand, means 'at an uncomfortably high temperature, at an excessive temperature', so if you touch it, chances are you'll get burnt.

Another example that comes to mind:

On a warm day, the temperature is around 25° C, while on a hot day, it's around 35°C.

Hope this helps.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conor-Fitz

What does the 'aan' mean in this context?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wicketd
Wicketd
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The verb is aanraken.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conor-Fitz

Thank you, this was the first separable verb I encountered and the was no explanation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dudrich
dudrich
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"You don't touch the warm plate?" is no good?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

I have been told that if the Dutch sentence provided is inverted, then the English translation must be as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MandyTyler

I agree with the previous posters regarding this comment. A totally stupid sentence which makes no sense at all in English!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

I thought adjectives describing het words didn't get the ending?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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That isn't quite right. If the adjective goes after the noun it's describing, the -e ending is never used regardless of gender and number. If the adjective goes before the noun, however, here are some simple rules to determine whether the -e ending is used:

  • Is the noun a de word? If so, the adjective always gets the -e ending.
  • Is the noun plural? If so, once more the adjective always gets the -e ending.
  • Is the noun a het word? If so, use the -e ending unless there are no articles or the articles "een" and "geen" are used.

De word examples:

  • Dat is een warme kop.
  • Dat is de warme kop.
  • Dat is jouw warme kop.

Het word examples:

  • Dat is een warm bord.
  • Dat is het warme bord.
  • Dat is jouw warme bord.

Plural noun examples:

  • Dat zijn warme borden.
  • Dat zijn de warme borden.
  • Dat zijn jouw warme borden.

Hope this clears up any confusion!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lewons7
Lewons7
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touch you the warm plate not on? This sentance really through me off.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betmun
betmun
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Is it wrong to say the hot plate instead of warm?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacobergo

Heet would be hot So in the sentence it would be, "raak je het hete bord niet aan?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eleni32
eleni32
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Can someone please explain the sentence structure (where does niet go in a sentence)?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacobergo

I could be wrong in this, (that's the problem with being a native speaker it comes natural so you don't think about it) but it would be at the start of the verb, but keep in mind that the start of the verb may be at the end of the sentence like in duolingo example. examples: niet aanraken alstublieft (don't touch please) zou je het niet aan willen raken? (can you not touch that?) raak je het niet aan? (are you not touching it) (as usual literal translations make less sense)

So as you can see, "niet" is consistently at the start of the word "aanraken" i.e. "aan" no matter where "aan" is located in the sentence. Just of the top of my head I cannot think of an example where this does not happen but that's not to say there are no such cases.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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As far as I've understood from what I've read on dutchgrammar.com , niet is mostly (but not always) placed after the Direct Object (which in a way, coincides with what you're saying).

Consider the following examples:

Ik weet het niet.

Ik verkoop dit huis niet.

*Hij

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Sorry, no edit button on the app: ignore that last '*Hij'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josefderry

The suggestions show I can use ''warm'' or ''hot''. Why is ''hot'' not accepted as an answer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacobergo

Hot = Heet, Warm = warm. there is a difference in temperature. "heet" in dutch is generally considered to be any temperature that has the potential to burn you. In this case the plate is just warm.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josefderry

thankyou jacobergo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam72608
Sam72608
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Is this like in German "Fass(-t du bitte) die warme Platte nicht an?" ? Or is it actually a casual question "Fasst du gerade nicht die warme Platte an?" ?

11 months ago
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