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"Are you going to call him?"

Translation:An bhfuil tú chun é a ghlaoch?

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/obekim

A Google search for "é a ghlaoch" gave only two results; both were from Duolingo. "í a ghlaoch" gave a single result. Surely the prepositional construction "glaoigh AR" needs to be maintained somehow? If, for example, we substitute the construction "éist le", would we throw away the "LE" and say "chun é a éist" rather than "chun éist leis"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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An bhfuill tu chun air a ghlaoch?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fr224
fr224
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Why not "An bhfuil tú chun á ghlaoch"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMarie310

Surely an ar construction is required here, because it is a phrasal verb? Wouldnt it need to be "an bhfuil tú chun a ghlaoch air" or something to that effect?....not sure but I thought you had to maintain the ar with this verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Personally I believe glaoch air is correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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What is wrong with 'An bhfuil tú chun glaoch air?'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That means “Are you ready to call him?” (in the “preparation” sense). The “going to” meaning (the “intention” sense) requires the relative particle a.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWilkinson1

The "going to" here is a way of specifying the future tense. For example "you will eat it" and "you are going to eat it" have the same meaning. There is no actual movement involved, no one is travelling anywhere. So can this be translated as "an glaoidh tú air"?

1 year ago