"¿No puedes dormir?"

Translation:You cannot sleep?

5 years ago

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Naasuk

The voice for sentence sounds utterly horrified.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aterix

i agree

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NevaGleaso

I have lost my slower speaking

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13

Please do not report technical issues in this language forum we we cannot help.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaRoark

I'm pretty sure evryone here knows that as you go through it speaks faster, I wasn't under the impression that this was a complaint.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim91292

She's Tired lololol

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mi_wood

Why isn't "Are you not able to sleep?" acceptable?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorge4890
jorge4890
  • 25
  • 18
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 77

It is the correct way of the interrogative sentence, because if you say "you cannot sleep" you are telling an affirmative sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hrutie

Depends on the intonation of the voice. I can say the sentence as if it is a question.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tac730

"You are unable to sleep ?" should be an reasonable translation

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanBarrag6

No soy capaz de dormir , sounds weird, i'm native spanish speaker who wants to learn english :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fillmoe
Fillmoe
  • 25
  • 8
  • 69

Why does this sentence and sentences in the previous parts of this lesson require the infinitive form? Is it required with puedes?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofa4ka
sofa4ka
  • 25
  • 20
  • 19
  • 12
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 137

It's 00:56 now! How did they know what to ask?? ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexwazzu

The voice sounds like it is saying " no puedo dormish". Like it just Stephen Hawking'd out

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clive274415
clive274415
  • 25
  • 15
  • 4
  • 437

Male voice is lousy

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maktmissbrukare

I'm not sure why, "You cannot fall asleep" is not also correct. Even if you mouseover dormir, the definition, "(to) fall asleep," appears.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jose_morena

Dormirse means to fall asleep. "Yo me duermo ahora: me estoy quedando dormido" = I'm falling asleep

Dormir means to sleep. "Yo duermo ahora: Estoy durmiendo ahora" = I'm sleeping

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hurls

The sentence sounds like she is saying no puedo dormir? How can anyone get puedes out of that pronunciation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
  • 17
  • 16
  • 13

Cannot you sleep? Why is it wrong???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shude
Shude
  • 25
  • 15
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3

It must be a good question because I can't think of a way to explain it other than we just don't say that. It's odd though--we would say, "Can't you sleep?" if we're frustrated ("Ugh--can't you sleep!?") or concerned ("Oh no--can't you sleep?"), but I can't imagine anyone using "cannot."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sirnuke
sirnuke
  • 16
  • 16
  • 7
  • 3

As far as I know "Cannot you sleep" wouldn't sound correct to any native English speaker - though I can only speak for the US. Not before you sounds off, same if the question was "don't you sleep?"|"do not you sleep?"|"do you not sleep?". If I were to guess at the grammar rule, the contraction sets the sentence as negative, but otherwise the not has to follow the you.

Along the same lines as other contractions having different meanings and rules compared to their non-contracted forms. Let's is a formal contraction of let us, but they are typically not interchangable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurettaRo3

Apart from Can't you sleep? Only "can you not sleep" is the only way to put "cannot" in that.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YazykPineapple

I understand that "¿No puedes dormir?" = "You cannot sleep?" But what would the Spanish be for "Can you not sleep?" There's a difference there and I would like to know if it's even different in Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maddi91

I put "Why can't you sleep" and that was also incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

I think it is because they have different meanings. "Why can't you sleep?" = you would be asking for the reason why someone is unable to sleep. "You cannot sleep?" Is a yes or no question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

Why is "puedes" plural ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeGruberm

It's not plural; it's the familiar form of the verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

Oh. yes. Of course....Thanks .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imtonie

how about duerme/s?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdiDourado
EdiDourado
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 11
  • 6
  • 422

Can not you sleep? Why is it wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simo678
Simo678
  • 15
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

So are the infinitive forms of the verbs mainly only used in questions? And conjugations in statements?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeGruberm

It's more a matter of sentence construction, just like in English. The verb is "poder", not "dormir". So you can look at it as literally "are you not able TO SLEEP".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissCharlix

Well that was hard to understand, sounded like 'doorneeezh' and pretty much unintelligible!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pato_Tonto
Pato_Tonto
  • 19
  • 17
  • 10
  • 10
  • 5

I thought that imperfect was "used to" or repeated actions in the past, this seems to be just infinitives. :/ Is duolingo lying to me?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edubellomo

Can't you sleep is the correct translation..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Terri131513

I put "Can you sleep?" because that's how we would translate that in English, but it says it's wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeGruberm

In English, we tend to have a more relaxed way of saying things. "Can you sleep?" and "Can you not sleep?" can be interpreted differently, with the former asking the question "Are you capable of sleeping?" and the latter asking "Are you having trouble sleeping?" (more or less, in the literal sense). The negative, "not" (or "no"), becomes a significant part of the literal meaning, especially in non-English speech.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnieHayd

Duo is definately correct in their translation on this one. You cannot sleep/you can't sleep, would both be the way US English is spoken. We would NEVER say, Cannot you sleep. The construction is not correct. : )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Florence435331

Difficult to understand the beginning sound for the word "domir".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeandPei

Why is it not 'no puedes duermes?' ...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeGruberm

This is because "dormir" is literally "to sleep". So consider it as such: "Are you not able to sleep?"

As an aside, some language programs use the quick trick of teaching phrases like "I am able", "I would like", "I prefer"...which allows you to tack any number of infinitives onto the end of the phrase. ("I am able to sleep/to read/to dance/to eat.") A lazy technique, in my opinion, because it doesn't help you understand other people who don't speak like that.

The above is a meandering on my part, but it demonstrates the use of consecutive verbs (in your case, "poder" and "dormir") with the second one always being in the infinitive form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vlauntern

Not until I have finished duolingo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanns
Amanns
  • 13
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

of course not, your under my bed growling at me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorge4890
jorge4890
  • 25
  • 18
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 77

You cannot sleep is an affirmative sentence, it sound better to say Can you sleep?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13

'You cannot sleep?' is a negative question - 'cannot' is negative. The affirmative question is, indeed, 'Can you sleep?' but the Spanish is in the negative, 'No puedes dormir?' However, we would never ask either question. The normal translation, and usage, is, ' Can't you sleep?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosFrancisco

It would not accept 'you can't sleep'. Seems like it should.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheilajwilliams

You can't sleep? Should be allowed

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rosanna89660

I used "Can't you sleep?", but honestly, it doesn't really sound correct in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13

It's perfectly correct, and the only translation that would normally be used in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DemonicAngel1602

Who cannot sleep? Me

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrekl
jrekl
  • 24
  • 391

Why can't it be "no puedes duermes"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13

'No puedes duermes' would translate as 'you can't you sleep'. You can't have two active verbs in a sentence. Here the active verb is 'puedes' so the second verb must be in the infinitive, 'dormir'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RadBustahh

Why is "Fall asleep" wrong? That is the exact same thing!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
Andreaja69
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13

Yes, it means the same thing, but they are two different expressions. I think 'fall asleep' would be 'dormirse' or 'quedarme dormido'. 'Dormir' is just 'to sleep', and this would be the expression you would use, 'Can't you sleep?'.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexis585810

no, or else i wouldnt be saying this. d'oh

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanaKuntz

I swear I pronounce these words correctly but I get marked wrong!!

7 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.