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"You eat your dinner with us."

Translation:Itheann tú do dhinnéar linn.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Liamwilll
Liamwilll
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Why does Itheann sibh not work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Itheann sibh bhur ndinnéar linn. should be an equally correct translation, given the ambiguity of “you” and “your”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liamwilll
Liamwilll
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oh, so 'sibh bhur' and 'tu do' are ok combinations but not sibh do?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Itheann sibh do dhinnéar linn. would mean “You (multiple people) eat your (single person’s) dinner with us.” — one would need to address multiple people and refer to the dinner of a particular person within that group for that combination to make sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

sibh do would be like saying, in Southern American English, "Y'all eat your dinner" (i.e. one person's dinner - your and y'all's are distinct, with the former only being singular, for me) instead of "Y'all eat y'all's dinner".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kassie309172

Thanks

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IJR3
IJR3
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Why do you need "linn" and not "linne"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

linne should be accepted. It's the emphatic form - "You eat your dinner with us". Irish uses suffixes and syntax to express emphasis whereas English uses stress.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IJR3
IJR3
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oh, I should have reported it, dangit

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conchubhar1987

How would you write this sentence if it is an order to the person? As in, You eat your dinner with us! (not them!). Or is there any difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"Ith do dhinnéar linn!" if addressed to just one person.

"Ithigí bhur ndinnéar linn!" if addressed to a group of people.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe456253

When do you know to use the prefix "n-"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The "n" in "ndinnéar" is not called an "n-prefix" in Irish.

The letters "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", "p" and "t" are "eclipsed" in certain grammatical circumstances - one of those circumstances is after plural possessive pronouns "ár" (our), "bhur" (your) and "a" (their).

Each of these letters has a different "urú", and words starting with "d" are eclipsed with "n", so "our dinner" is "ár ndinnéar", whereas words starting with "b" are eclipsed with "m" ("bhur mbialann" - "your restaurant"), words with "c" are eclipsed with "g" ("a gcappal" - "their horse"), words that start with "f" are eclipsed with "bh" ("ár bhfón" - "our phone"), "g" is eclipsed by "n" ("bhur ngnó" - "your business"), "p" with "b" ("a bplean" - "their plan") and "t" is eclipsed by "d" ("ár dteach" - "our house").

When the noun starts with a vowel, you do use an "n-prefix" - "ár n-athair", "a n-uimhir". But it is important to recognize that the "n" in "ndinnéar" is not called an "n-prefix". It's called "eclipsis" in English, and "urú" in Irish.

1 year ago