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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaclavH

lenition question

Hi,

I am seeing a weird difference between my grammar book (Irish Grammar book from Nollaig Mac Congáil). In this book - lenition of nouns chapter - he says that ALL nouns (sg., pl., masc. fem.) undergo lenition in few cases including mo, do, a (3rd sg. masc). then I got to "my department" = mo roinne and I realised that according to that it should be mo rhoinne. I do not see any exception he lists to apply.

I assume this is not regional thing?

February 28, 2015

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Certain starting letters do not undergo lenition: r, l,n, sc, sp, st, sm, sf. However, note that, at least with "l", it is lenited in some dialects, but it's never wrriten as "lh"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaclavH

thanks... I am trying to understand if this is cross referencing issue in the book or just some oversight etc...

just out of curiosity... if it is lenited in some dialects... how is it written then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fr224

How is it pronounced? /λ/, I'm guessing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I believe it's /L/ vs. /l/, actually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Which sound does /L/ represent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Here ya go

<n> can also lenite, with /N/ and /n/. Here is /N/

Note: Those are Celticist symbols, not IPA.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Ah, thanks. The Celticist “L” is properly rendered as a small capital (and Markdown doesn’t have a way to render small caps), and the sound is /l̪ˠ/ in IPA.

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