"Keep on cleaning the bathtub."

Translation:Continuez à nettoyer la baignoire.

5 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/hornplyr
hornplyrPlus
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"Continue" is correct because it's imperative, right? Haven't covered that yet, Duo!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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yes that's right, and it is indeed the only case where 2nd person singular does not take an -s at the end (1st group of verbs ending in -er).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hornplyr
hornplyrPlus
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Thanks! I knew that from another source, just glossed over it here since Duo hasn't covered imperatives yet.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philipo79

I didn't know orders could be informal. I thought there was only one form of imperative which uses the vous form of the verb

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Orders are not informal because you use the "tu" form. If you give an order to your child, you will indeed expect to be obeyed.

"tu" is familiar, not informal. Using "tu" does not prevent from being grammatically correct, polite, respectful, etc.

I know the concept is difficult to grasp!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philipo79

Thanks. I can understand how your child would want you to speak fondly to them.

I've just one more question. In conversation I typically end up coming out with some random mix of familiar and unfamiliar. I reckon most French would put that down to me having poor French. But if a fluent French speaker switches between the two forms whilst talking to you would you normally take that as a change of mood in the speaker?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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I don't think so. On principle, once you and your counterpart have started to "tutoyer", "vous" should not come back. Maybe for a while, a mix of the two can happen, but it should be just for the time it needs to adapt (ie to bring the person into your "familiar circle" so to speak).

If someone starts to "tutoyer" you, it may be unconscious and show a desire to start becoming familiar (friendly) with you.

However, it is much easier to say "tu es bête" as a joke than "vous êtes bête" which could be a little too much for a person you don't know well (I picked non offensive words, but you will understand what I mean).

In addition, there are circumstances where you can keep "vouvoyer" someone who will "tutoyer" you. Example: my son's nanny asked me to "tutoyer" her because I reminded her of her mother. So I did. But she kept on "vouvoyer" me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aron89ification
Aron89ification
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I'm confused...how do I know when and when not to put "a" or "de" before the infinitive? I'm not even asking about differentiation between the two, just when and when not to use one of them.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Unfortunately, you have to learn the construction of each verb with its appropriate preposition: But you are lucky here, because you can also say "continue de nettoyer la baignoire".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aron89ification
Aron89ification
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I'm not sure if you understood what I'm asking, but maybe you did. What I'm asking is not which one to use. I'm asking how I can know whether or not to put the preposition,whichever it may be, before the infinitive. Is it dependent on where in the sentence the infinitive is, or is it all a matter of which verb I'm using?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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It is a matter of which verb you use.

A number of verbs do not need a preposition at all: they are called "semi-auxiliary verbs": vouloir, pouvoir, savoir... http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/semiauxiliary.htm

For all others, you have to learn the preposition with the verb

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogradybe

Anytime you want the cleaning crew to keep cleaning. That would include spouse and kids I think,

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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In France, only husbands and sons do... ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irenicPie

When would you use "Continue à nettoyer"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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It is simply the "tu" version of the imperative and it is accepted as an alternative translation here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stancollins

I wonder what is wrong with 'laver' here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Sorry nobody has answered you sooner, Stan. I suppose that in this particular sense, "laver" might be used, for example you could use "laver" for washing your car, the laundry, or even for a mother to wash a child. Maybe the reason that "nettoyer" is a bit better here is that you are washing it out and "nettoyer" is used in the sense of "to clean" something up/out, rather than just "wash" it. Subtle, eh?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adam_Prov16.9
Adam_Prov16.9
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I don't understand how to use 'à' in French

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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You may not understand it, because your logic cannot work.

Maybe take a look at this summary chart to find out which verbs are constructed directly with an infinitive, or with the prepositions "à" or "de":

http://www.connectigramme.com/preposition.html/verbes-prep.html

2 years ago
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